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Boat
Maintenance
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Boat care

Reducing the chance of developing a diesel cabin odour
Changing the primary fuel filter and draining the bowl during the engine service runs a high risk of splashing diesel about the engine. Equally a badly sealed fuel filter can drip fuel. This fuel then sticks to the surface with the excess seeping down into the bilge. This causes the cabin to develop a diesel-mildew odour.

Avoiding fender rolling chafe
Laying alongside in a chop, or near a very busy waterway where the wash of passing boats rolls in, will cause a vessel to continuously jostle back and forth upon the fenders.

Keeping a wintered boat well ventilated under the cover with companionway ventilation
Covering a boat for the winter period is an excellent way to keep it in good condition and reduce maintenance. However the canopy will dramatically reduce airflow and the lack of ventilation can make the boat go very stale below decks.

Protecting a wintered vessel from boot grit whilst carrying out work on it ashore
Hard standing wintered boats are typically stored in mud yards that have been filled by shale or gravel. This sticks into the treads of work boots. As people come and go from the vessel it gets carried aboard and trodden in around the boat.

Protecting the rudder and tiller when leaving the vessel unattended
The rudder and tiller will move around on the boat when the vessel is left unattended.

Keeping a wintered boat well ventilated under the cover by opening up the portholes
Covering a boat for the winter period is an excellent way to keep it in good condition and reduce the spring clean up work. However the canopy will dramatically reduce airflow and the lack of ventilation can make the boat go very stale below decks.

Avoiding exhaust stains
Black exhaust stains tend to build up beneath the exhaust outlet.

Reducing polishing maintenance on brass and bronze
Bronze or brass trimming features such as bells, cleats, winch heads, mast heads, gallows legs, wheel, gauge bezels, galley hardware, fuel caps etc look sensational; particularly so on traditional vessels. However they can go black in the marine environment in a matter of weeks if not days.

Protecting the topsides from the mooring buoy
Once the moorings have been picked up and belayed the vessel has a tendency to run on pulling the mooring buoy tight against the hull. This also may happen whilst unattended on moorings. If wind and current are turning about or working in opposition yachts have a tendency to press forward against a mooring buoy.

Removing rust marks and stains
Accidentally leave a piece of ferrous metal on deck and it will quickly cause a rust mark to bond with your paint work. Small metal filings just collect over time and leave a rusty residual. Or in my case topside bolt heads, even thought they were stainless steel, just slowly bleed light rust marks down the gel coat. Once they appear the impossible to remove.


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