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Dungarvan Town Quay

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Overview





Dungarvan Harbour is situated on Ireland’s south coast in Co. Waterford, about midway between Carnsore Point and Cork Harbour, and on the northwest most point of Dungarvan Bay. It is a provincial town with a quay that dries at low water but there are floating pontoon berths inside the harbour and a deep water anchorage outside. Vessels planning to lay alongside the quay must be prepared to take to the ground.

Situated three miles from the mouth of the bay the town quay offers complete protection from any condition and can be truly described as a hurricane hole. Navigation is straightforward as the entrance channel is well marked with ample, easily picked up and closely-spaced channel markers that leave little to confuse a vessel approaching from the east. The harbour however is separated from the sea by a shallow two mile wide east facing bay that restricts access to the latter half of the tide.
Please note

Although appearing daunting on a chart, in practice with a supporting tide, entry into Dungarvan could not be simpler. Tidal planning is however essential for access as the town quay can only be reached on a rise of tide sufficient enough to accommodate the vessel’s requisite draft. Southwest gales send a heavy swell into the bay and those entering on the margins of the tide should factor this in. It would not be advisable to approach the shallow bay in strong conditions from the south round to the east when the bar breaks. People unfamiliar with the harbour should prefer the more forgiving rising tide.




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Keyfacts for Dungarvan Town Quay
Club  +353 58 45663    
Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.


Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: rising tide required for accessRestriction: may be subject to a sand bar


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Now Force

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

LWS draught

1 metres (3.28 feet).

Today's tide estimates

LW 01:23 (0.9m) HW 07:58 (4m)
LW 14:14 (1m) HW 20:14 (3.9m)
Now approaching Neaps

Swell today




Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.


Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: rising tide required for accessRestriction: may be subject to a sand bar


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 5.450' N, 007° 37.100' W

Dungarvan town quay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Dungarvan initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 4.500' N, 007° 32.000' W
This waypoint is midway between Carrickapane and Carricknamoan rocks or approximately 600 metres from each.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in the westbound Route location or eastbound Route location sequenced 'Rosslare to Cork' coastal description; southern approaches may use either description.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Dungarvan Town Quay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 1 miles ESE
  2. Helvick - 2.1 miles SE
  3. Stradbally Cove - 3.7 miles ENE
  4. Ardmore Bay - 5.7 miles SSW
  5. Youghal - 7.3 miles SW
  6. Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 7.4 miles ENE
  7. Knockadoon Harbour - 9.5 miles SW
  8. Ballycotton - 13.1 miles SW
  9. Port of Waterford - 13.3 miles ENE
  10. Little Island - 13.9 miles ENE
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 1 miles ESE
  2. Helvick - 2.1 miles SE
  3. Stradbally Cove - 3.7 miles ENE
  4. Ardmore Bay - 5.7 miles SSW
  5. Youghal - 7.3 miles SW
  6. Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 7.4 miles ENE
  7. Knockadoon Harbour - 9.5 miles SW
  8. Ballycotton - 13.1 miles SW
  9. Port of Waterford - 13.3 miles ENE
  10. Little Island - 13.9 miles ENE
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


How to get in?
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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Dungarvan is a busy coastal market town and harbour that sits at the head of the extensive Dungarvan Bay. The town is situated at the mouth of the Colligan River which divides it into two parts of Dungarvan to the west and Abbeyside to the east. Dungarvan Harbour as such is formed by The Quay, on the western town side, and The Causeway to the north which was bridged in the late 18th century to join the town’s two halves and provide road access to Waterford. Outside the harbour the 1½ mile sandbar ‘The Cunnigar’ defines the western limit of the 2½ mile wide Dungarvan Bay.

Dungarvan Bay is entered between the high bold promontory of Helvick Head on the south and Ballynacourty Point and its outlying rocks to the north. Viewed at high water, the bay presents a large expanse of which the greater part uncovers and the remainder is shallow.





A narrow well marked channel leads along the northern side of the bay, from Wyse's Point to Abbey Point, into the town quay located about 2.2 miles west of the entrance. The channel has a least depth of 0.2 metres LWS over the bar and requires a flood tide for access. Using the tide however the channel can admit vessels with draughts in excess of three metres to the quays.





Southern Approach Vessels approaching from the south should keep at least 400 metres off Helvick Head, or 200 metres off its outlying rocks, preferably rounding the headland along the 15 metre contour. Pass Helvick’s east cardinal to port and steer for Ballynacourty Point lighthouse for just over a mile. Do not allow the baring to the lighthouse to drift below 325° T to keep clear of Carrickapane's westerly outliers. Once south of Ballynacourty Point lighthouse, the Wyse mark south of Wyse Point's golf course greens, followed by the buoyed channel, will be readily apparent.

Eastern Approach Vessels approaching from the east will find no impediments to a direct approach to the initial fix.

Initial fix location The Dungarvan initial fix is set midway between Carrickapane and Carricknamoan rocks. This is approximately 600 metres north of Carrickapane Rock that is central to the entrance of Dungarvan Bay; by night covered by Ballynacourty Point Lighthouse’s red sector.





Better described as an islet and locally known as Black Rock, it is a clearly visible 2.0 metres high rock that sticks up in all conditions. A sunken rocky ledge of 1.1 to 1.7 metres of cover extends 200 metres from it in a west by south direction. On other parts of Carrickapane it is largely steep-to.

Carrickapane or Black Rock – unmarked position: 52° 04.000’N, 007° 32.000’W





600 metres to the northern side of the initial fix is Carricknamoan Rock that is situated half a mile eastward of Ballynacourty Point; by night in Ballynacourty Point Lighthouse’s green sector.





This is a one metre high flat topped rock with a surrounding rocky patch. A reef called Caricknagaddy, nearly all uncovered at low water, extends half a mile from the point in a south-easterly direction, terminating in Carricknamoan. The direction of this reef is indicated by the sector of green light of the lighthouse.





When approaching the initial fix it may be more than difficult to pick out Carricknamoan from the shoreline behind. At deck level the low lying reef appears all as one when viewed from the waypoint. Nevertheless it is readily apparent that the vessel is in the middle of the gap with plenty of space as it is 0.6 of a nautical mile wide.
Please note

It would be useful for first time visitors to have a crew member with binoculars ready to locate the rocks and the following harbour marks.







Proceed west from the initial fix to pass south of the white tower of Ballynacourty Point Lighthouse and north of a yellow outflow buoy.

Outfall Buoy - Fl(2)Y.5s position: 52° 4.408' N 007° 32.910' W

Ballynacourty Point Lighthouse - Fl (2) WRG 10s position: 52° 04.688’N, 007° 33.182’W

The Wyse’s Point channel marker will soon be seen approximately half a mile west from Ballynacourty Point Lighthouse.

Wyse - Port Red Can Buoy FL. R. 5s position: 52° 04.719’N, 007° 33.971’W

From the Wyse buoy, provided the requisite tidal depth is in place, it is simply a matter of following the channel markers into the entrance between Cunnigar Point and Abbey Point.


The key to the channel is capturing a rising tide that can accommodate the vessels draft. At half-tide there should be at least 1.8 metres in the channel between the buoys. This may again vary depending upon the preceding winter’s easterly gales, especially so early in the sailing season. Likewise a westerly gale may somewhat diminish the rise whilst an easterly would cause a higher tide and flooding in the town. The depth in the marked channel may have decreased.
Please note

In 2010 /11 Deadman Sand has been breached and a narrow deep channel is emerging through it. This is roughly a line from the Wyse to Davy Murray markers. This channel isn't marked yet.



As such it is best to take it steady on the margins of the tide and proceed with a sharp eye to the depth sounder. If the bottom is touched it will only be sand and clay, there are no rocks in the channel. The last noted positions of the channel markers along with the beacons are below and should be treated as indicative only. The channel tends to move within narrow boundaries depending upon the amount and extent of preceding easterly gales, and the buoys move to reflect these changes.





Ballynacourty - Port Red Can Buoy FL. R. 10s position: 52° 04.989’N, 007° 34.483’W

Glendine - Starboard Green Cone FL. G. 10s position: 52° 05.021’N, 007° 34.618’W

Deadman Sands - Port Buoy Red Can FL. R. 8s position: 52° 04.972’N, 007° 34.895’W

Davy Murray - Starboard Green Cone Buoy FL. G. 8s position: 52° 04.944’N, 007° 35.247’W

Spit Bank - Starboard Green Cone Buoy FL. G. 6s position: 52° 04.944’N 007° 35.783’W

Whitehouse - Port Red Can Buoy FL. R. 6s position: 52° 04.905’N, 007° 35.922’W

Black Strand - Starboard Green Cone Buoy FL. G. 5s position: 52° 05.060’N, 007° 36.267’W

Goileen - Port Red Can Buoy FL. R. 5s position: 52° 05.081’N, 007° 36.343’W





From the entrance between Cunnigar Point and Abbey Point the river fairway up into the town quay is marked by four lighted beacons.

110 - Green Beacon FL. G. 4s position: 52° 05.190’N, 007° 36.722’W

Lookout - Red Beacon FL. R. 4s position: 52° 05.208’N, 007° 36.779’W

Castle - Red Beacon FL. R. 3s position: 52° 05.319’N, 007° 36.838’W

Pond – Green Beacon FL. G. 3s position: 52° 05.341’N, 007° 36.812’W





Haven location Inside the harbour there is not enough room to swing in deep water. Several mooring buoys are situated abreast of the town which are used by fishing vessels. Bilge keeled vessels, that comfortably take to the hard, may make use of borrowed moorings - subject to availability.

Long keeled craft or vessels that stand well should dry out on the western quay wall and the best berth to aim for is one with a ladder.
Please note

The tide runs swiftly along the quay and it is advisable to moor port side on facing upriver to address the ebb current.



Yachts that need to stay afloat have two options, utilise the club pontoon or go to deep waters immediately outside the entrance to the harbour.

Inside the basin Dungarvan Yacht Club are most accommodating with their club jetty and charge a small fee. It is advisable to contact Dungarvan Yacht Club +353 58 45663 in advance. Payments may be made at the clubhouse; immediately above and overlooking the town basin.
Please note

Vessels carrying any draft should expect their keels to sink into the soft mud at low water alongside the club pontoon. There is also reportedly a small pool available that could float a boat up to 1.8 metres at low water and locals can best advise as to the location of this.







A very deep-water pool exists immediately outside the harbour. The anchoring position is close southwest of Cunnigar Point where 8 metres will be found.
This is the less preferred option as it is more exposed to southerly and easterly conditions at high water. Likewise the tides run fast here and space is limited as it is already heavily populated with moorings. Avoid anchoring in such a fashion as to encroach upon the fairway. Land at the town slip.
Please note

The bottom can be foul here and a tripping line is highly advisable; borrowing an existing mooring would be the best option all round if possible.

.


What's the story here?
Dungarvan derives its name from the Irish Dún Garbháin meaning ‘fort of Garbhan’ or ‘Garbhan's fort’. This refers to Saint Garbhan who founded a church here in the seventh century. It is a pretty and thriving market town with a long history.

The origins of the town can be traced back to a much earlier period of history than the time of Saint Garbhan. It is recorded that in about the third century A.D. a tribe called the 'Deise' settled on the site where Dungarvan now stands. The Normans arrived in the 1170s and built a Motte and Bailey fortification at Gallowshill to the west of the town.

King John came to Waterford in 1185 and constructed several fortifications in the area to hold his ground. The remains of his Dungarvan Castle can be seen standing today just north of where the harbour narrows on the west bank. The castle is being restored and is open to the public via guided tours. It consists of a polygonal shell keep with an enclosing curtain wall, with a dominant corner tower and a gate tower. Inside the curtain wall is a two storey military barracks, dating from the first half of the 18th century, and the barracks houses an informative exhibition, including an audio visual presentation that provides a summary of both Dungarvan's and the castle’s history. Of the walls John built to fortify the town, no traces remain.

The most marked historical feature for those arriving by sea is the preserved ruins of the Augustinian Priory that dates back to 1290 AD and is situated on the east bank of the harbour entrance. The abbey’s sixty foot high square tower, resting on groined arches, was adapted as a belfry for the adjoining Catholic Church. The Abbey buildings were ruined after the Cromwellian attack on Dungarvan. The present Catholic Church, St. Augustine's Church was built on the foundations of the Abbey and incorporates fragments from it including the coat of arms on the west wall. The church has tombs dating back to 1490 within its grounds.

In the nineteenth century the fifth and sixth Dukes of Devonshire redesigned the town. The Colligan River which divides Dungarvan into two is connected by a causeway and bridge that were built by the Dukes. They also constructed the town’s hallmark square and street structure. Under their development Dungarvan grew and flourished to eventually become the thriving business and residential centre it is today.

Dungarvan is currently the administrative centre of County Waterford and offers an appealing blend of traditional and modern lifestyles. Those who want to make it a base from which to explore the surrounding countryside, will find seascapes, green placid river valleys and wild rugged heather covered mountains within a short driving distance of the town quay. Of particular interest is an area called Ring, seven miles south of Dungarvan, in Irish, An Rinn. It is the second most easterly Irish-speaking area in the country. This offers an opportunity to sample traditional Irish life, where regular Irish music sessions are held in the local pubs to entertain everybody. The Seanchaí, Irish for storyteller, pub on the Youghal road is one such example.

From a boating perspective this is a perfect place to avoid a bad weather system. The basin is completely protected and it is in the centre of the provincial town where there is plenty to see and explore, plus it has excellent connections to venture further afield. Likewise it is an ideal place to provision fuel and supplies.


What facilities are available?
Dungarvan is a major town that has a full range of urban services available immediately to hand. This is an excellent location to provision the vessel with everything, including fuel, within a 10 minute walk from the clubhouse jetty. The sailing club are very welcoming and delighted to see travelling sailors. They have showers and a comfortable clubhouse along with the jetty and some moorings that are often offered free of charge. Please reciprocate this courtesy by bringing as much business as possible to the club house.

There are a host of cafes, restaurants, pubs serving food and even a supermarket in the renovated buildings along the quay, plus more around the town. In boating terms there is a well-maintained concrete slipway in Dungarvan town, suitable for launching vessels up to eight metres in length. However, larger vessels should only use it up to three hours either side of high tide.

Local travel is catered for via plenty of taxis available at the taxi rank which is a stroll from the club pontoon, and there are a host of bus options for those wishing to travel further afield. There are hourly 040 Express bus services to Cork, Waterford and Dublin all with international airports. Local bus services are also available: 362 Ardmore, 364 Waterford, 366 Waterford, Fermoy & Mallow and 386 Clonmel. A night coach service, via Sealink’s Rosslare to Fishguard ferry, connects to Bristol and London in the UK. The town has excellent road communications - the N25 road (European route E30), which connects Cork, Waterford and Rosslare Europort.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred in Dungarvan. However this is in the centre of a town with public access to the quays, so it would be best to lock up and clear the decks as normal in a busy area such as this.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford & Austin Flynn Commodore of Dungarvan Yacht Club. Photos with thanks to Mik Harman, SeanJohnSean and Michael Harpur.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.
























The following videos may help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Dungarvan.


The following video presents a good overview of Dungarvan.




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