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Dungarvan Town Quay

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Overview





Dungarvan Harbour is situated on Ireland’s south coast in Co. Waterford, about midway between Carnsore Point and Cork Harbour, and on the northwest most point of Dungarvan Bay. It is a provincial town with a quay that dries at low water but there are floating pontoon berths inside the harbour and a deep water anchorage outside. Vessels planning to lay alongside the quay must be prepared to take to the ground.

Dungarvan Harbour is situated on Ireland’s south coast in Co. Waterford, about midway between Carnsore Point and Cork Harbour, and on the northwest most point of Dungarvan Bay. It is a provincial town with a quay that dries at low water but there are floating pontoon berths inside the harbour and a deep water anchorage outside. Vessels planning to lay alongside the quay must be prepared to take to the ground.

Situated three miles from the mouth of the bay the town quay offers complete protection from any condition and can be truly described as a hurricane hole. Navigation is straightforward as the entrance channel is well marked with ample, easily picked up and closely-spaced channel markers that leave little to confuse a vessel approaching from the east. The harbour however is separated from the sea by a shallow two mile wide east facing bay that restricts access to the latter half of the tide.
Please note

Although appearing daunting on a chart, in practice with a supporting tide, entry into Dungarvan could not be simpler. Tidal planning is however essential for access as the town quay can only be reached on a rise of tide sufficient enough to accommodate the vessel’s requisite draft. Southwest gales send a heavy swell into the bay and those entering on the margins of the tide should factor this in. It would not be advisable to approach the shallow bay in strong conditions from the south round to the east when the bar breaks. People unfamiliar with the harbour should prefer the more forgiving rising tide.




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Keyfacts for Dungarvan Town Quay
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The following videos may help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Dungarvan.


The following video presents a good overview of Dungarvan.



About Dungarvan Town Quay

Dungarvan derives its name from the Irish Dún Garbháin meaning ‘fort of Garbhan’ or ‘Garbhan's fort’. This refers to Saint Garbhan who founded a church here in the seventh century. It is a pretty and thriving market town with a long history.

The origins of the town can be traced back to a much earlier period of history than the time of Saint Garbhan. It is recorded that in about the third century A.D. a tribe called the 'Deise' settled on the site where Dungarvan now stands. The Normans arrived in the 1170s and built a Motte and Bailey fortification at Gallowshill to the west of the town.

King John came to Waterford in 1185 and constructed several fortifications in the area to hold his ground. The remains of his Dungarvan Castle can be seen standing today just north of where the harbour narrows on the west bank. The castle is being restored and is open to the public via guided tours. It consists of a polygonal shell keep with an enclosing curtain wall, with a dominant corner tower and a gate tower. Inside the curtain wall is a two storey military barracks, dating from the first half of the 18th century, and the barracks houses an informative exhibition, including an audio visual presentation that provides a summary of both Dungarvan's and the castle’s history. Of the walls John built to fortify the town, no traces remain.

The most marked historical feature for those arriving by sea is the preserved ruins of the Augustinian Priory that dates back to 1290 AD and is situated on the east bank of the harbour entrance. The abbey’s sixty foot high square tower, resting on groined arches, was adapted as a belfry for the adjoining Catholic Church. The Abbey buildings were ruined after the Cromwellian attack on Dungarvan. The present Catholic Church, St. Augustine's Church was built on the foundations of the Abbey and incorporates fragments from it including the coat of arms on the west wall. The church has tombs dating back to 1490 within its grounds.

In the nineteenth century the fifth and sixth Dukes of Devonshire redesigned the town. The Colligan River which divides Dungarvan into two is connected by a causeway and bridge that were built by the Dukes. They also constructed the town’s hallmark square and street structure. Under their development Dungarvan grew and flourished to eventually become the thriving business and residential centre it is today.

Dungarvan is currently the administrative centre of County Waterford and offers an appealing blend of traditional and modern lifestyles. Those who want to make it a base from which to explore the surrounding countryside, will find seascapes, green placid river valleys and wild rugged heather covered mountains within a short driving distance of the town quay. Of particular interest is an area called Ring, seven miles south of Dungarvan, in Irish, An Rinn. It is the second most easterly Irish-speaking area in the country. This offers an opportunity to sample traditional Irish life, where regular Irish music sessions are held in the local pubs to entertain everybody. The Seanchaí, Irish for storyteller, pub on the Youghal road is one such example.

From a boating perspective this is a perfect place to avoid a bad weather system. The basin is completely protected and it is in the centre of the provincial town where there is plenty to see and explore, plus it has excellent connections to venture further afield. Likewise it is an ideal place to provision fuel and supplies.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Helvick - 2.1 miles SE
Ardmore Bay - 5.7 miles SSW
Youghal - 7.3 miles SW
Knockadoon Harbour - 9.5 miles SW
Ballycotton - 13.1 miles SW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 1 miles ESE
Stradbally Cove - 3.7 miles ENE
Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 7.4 miles ENE
Dunmore East - 14.5 miles E
Creadan Head - 15.6 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Dungarvan Town Quay.






































The following videos may help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Dungarvan.


The following video presents a good overview of Dungarvan.




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