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Cobh is situated on the south coast of Ireland within Cork’s extensive natural harbour. This haven is located on the southern shoreline of Great Island, opposite Haulbowline Island. It offers a seasonal pontoon in the heart of Cobh town.

Being well within the ‘Cove of Cork’ the pontoon berth offers complete protection. Safe access is assured in all reasonable conditions by Cork Harbour, one of the most easily approached, well-marked and safest natural harbours in the world.
Please note

Although the Lower Harbour is very well marked for night navigation, owing to Cobh’s lights and the vast amount of markers, first time visitors should prefer a day entry as it may prove challenging at night.




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Keyfacts for Cobh
HM  +353 21 4273125      info@portofcork.ie      Ch.12, 14 &16
Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Now Force

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

LWS draught

3 metres (9.84 feet).

Today's tide estimates

LW 01:53 (1m) HW 07:53 (3.9m)
LW 14:14 (1.1m) HW 20:04 (3.8m)
Now approaching Neaps

Swell today




Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 50.925' N, 008° 17.850' W

This is the position of the pontoon off The Quays.

What is the initial fix?

The following Cork Harbour initial will set up a final approach:
51° 46.580' N, 008° 15.460' W
This waypoint is a mile out from the entrance and near the Outflow Marker Fl(Y) 20s. It is set on the alignment of 354° (T) of the Dogsnose leading lights that are situated on the east side of Cork Harbour entrance. This waypoint sets up an east channel approach but a vessel may alter course to and enter via the west channel.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore and approach details are available in the westbound Rosslare to Cork Harbour Route location or eastbound Mizen Head to Cork Harbour Route location sequence.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cobh for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Spike Island - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Cuskinny - 0.7 miles ENE
  3. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.8 miles W
  4. Glenbrook - 0.9 miles WNW
  5. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles S
  6. Drake’s Pool - 1.8 miles SSW
  7. White Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Aghada - 2 miles E
  9. East Ferry Marina - 2 miles ENE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 2.4 miles ENE
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Spike Island - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Cuskinny - 0.7 miles ENE
  3. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.8 miles W
  4. Glenbrook - 0.9 miles WNW
  5. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles S
  6. Drake’s Pool - 1.8 miles SSW
  7. White Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Aghada - 2 miles E
  9. East Ferry Marina - 2 miles ENE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 2.4 miles ENE
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


How to get in?
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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Cobh is large town on the south side of Great Island in the middle of Cork Harbour. It is home to the harbour’s Port Operations Centre and the port's harbour pilot launches are based at the Camber pier at the town’s eastern end. The town is also home to Ireland's only dedicated cruise terminal. St. Colman's Cathedral standing on a high point overlooking the town, itself one of the tallest buildings in Ireland, makes the town conspicuous for many miles.

Convergance Point The run up the Lower Harbour to Cobh Road is best described in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry.

The pontoon is in Cobh Road opposite Haulbowline Island. The distinctive yellow Sirius Arts Centre will be seen and ‘The Quays Bar & Restaurant’ above the gang plank. The pier immediately east of this is only for tour boats to Spike Island. To the west is a deep water liner pier.

Haven location The jetty is owned by ‘The Quays Bar & Restaurant’ which has a large outdoor seating area. There is no fee for the berth, but users should reciprocate pontoon use by providing good custom to the ‘The Quays’ which is an ideal location to enjoy the scenery of Cobh Harbour. A vessel may overnight with permission of The Quays manager, phone +353 21 4813539 email admin@thequays.ie, open daily during the season 12pm-11pm. but always remember you are staying at their good graces. However Cuskinny, just over a mile east and out of the hustle and bustle, would most likely be a more restful option.


What's the story here?
Cobh has had many names down through the ages. The current Cobh, in Irish An Cóbh, has no Irish language meaning and is a gaelicisation of the English name of ‘Cove’. This name was first recorded in 1750 for the area, and prior to that the settlement was known as Ballyvoloon that overlooked "The Cove", which became the "The Cove of Cork", and then simply ‘Cove’.
In 1849 the area was renamed ‘Queenstown’ to commemorate a visit by Queen Victoria. This remained the town's name until 1922 when, with the foundation of the Irish Free State, it was renamed Cobh.

Cobh has an extraordinarily strong maritime heritage that touches all phases of Irish history. Cobh’s initial development stems from a Napoleonic Wars naval impetus when it was a key British port. At that time Haulbowline Island, its name 'Haul bow lines' is ‘prepare to go about’ on a warship of the line, was a bustling base that was commanded by an Admiral of the fleet. Practicing military manoeuvres during this period caused the world’s first yacht club to be founded on Haulbowline Island in 1720. In fact most of the town’s present day buildings owe their heritage to this period and the naval tradition has been a Cobh leitmotif.

During World War I it was a naval base for British and American destroyers operating against U-boats that preyed upon allied merchant vessels. The famous ‘Q-ships’ U-boat deterrent strategy was born in Cobh. These were common merchant ships that were heavily armed with concealed weaponry. The strategy was to lure submarines into making a surface attack on a seemingly defenceless vessel to enable an engagement when the U-boats were most vulnerable. Many of the ‘Q-ships’ were fitted out in Cobh, then called Queenstown, and hence they adopted the title ‘Queenstown’ – ships, "Q-ships". The first American servicemen to participate in First World War combat duty were the American destroyers that arrived in Cobh in May 1917. All combined to build Cobh’s significant contribution to stopping the U-boat blockade of Western Europe.

Due to its tactical military importance, under the terms of the 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty, Cobh, Berehaven and Lough Swilly, remained UK sovereign bases, known as the Treaty Ports, after the formation of the Irish Free State. They were finally handed back to the Irish government in 1938. Cobh’s naval tradition remains to this day with Haulbowline Island being the HQ of the Irish Navy.

Cobh has also been touched by the dark side of a nation under occupation. It was a major embarkation port for men, women and children who were deported to penal colonies such as Australia. Ships logs in the Cobh Museum show the records of such deportations. Being a major transatlantic Irish port, Cobh was also one of the largest Famine emigration ports. Between the years 1844-50 2.5 million of the 6 million mostly hungry and penniless that left to build a new life in North America, departed from Cobh. Many thrived and prospered, but many died on the journey in the terrible travelling conditions of the time. If you are a non-national with Irish roots, chances are your ancestors departed from here.

The town also has strong historical links to two of the most infamous ship sinking’s of the Twentieth Century. On 11 April 1912 Cobh was the final port of call for the RMS Titanic as she set out across the Atlantic on the legendary ill-fated maiden voyage.
Of the 123 passengers that boarded the Titanic in Cobh, only 44 survived the sinking. Likewise the Cunard passenger liner RMS Lusitania that was sunk by a German U-Boat off the Old Head Of Kinsale, has strong links to Cobh. 700 were rescued but 1198 passengers died in that sinking. The survivors and victims alike were brought to Cobh and over one hundred lie buried in the Old Church Cemetery just north of the town. A Lusitania Peace memorial in Casement Square, opposite the arched building housing the Cobh Library and Courthouse, commemorates the Lusitania victims.

Today Cobh is a bustling seaside town that features some of Ireland’s most beautiful architecture. Picture perfect and bordered by steep hillsides with colourful buildings that cling to the water's edge, it is crowned by the magnificent St. Colman's Cathedral which is set on a high point in the town with its spire and its carillon of 47 bells towering over the surroundings, it is East Cork’s most impressive Cathedral. With views from the ramparts of Cork Harbour it is the town’s dominant landmark and one of the tallest buildings in Ireland.

Cobh’s attractive combination of history and architecture provides an ambiance of a by-gone Victorian era that can be best experienced around the colourful buildings at the promenade park. This special character and history attracts up to 50 Cruise Liners each summer to a dedicated area immediately west of the pontoon.

The pontoon is located next to the Sirius Arts Centre that was once the historic 'Cork Harbour Yacht Club’. This itself will be of interest with an opportunity to call in and see the many exhibitions or music events which are hosted here. The history of the ill-fated Trans-Atlantic liners, plus the mass emigration of the famine, are told in ‘The Queenstown Story’ at the Cork Heritage Centre. This is situated in disused parts of the old Victorian railway station. Overlooking the Heritage Centre on the Upper Road above, and just a short walk away, is The Cobh Museum which is located in a former Presbyterian Church and is well worth a visit.

Music lovers may be lucky enough to hear some beautiful music drifting down to the pontoon on a sunny Sunday afternoon from the Victorian bandstand at The Prom, just above the berth in Kennedy Park. The town also holds several festivals such as the ‘Festival on the Hill’ in July, Cobh People's Regatta in August, and Colmans Cathedral hosts Carillon Concerts.

Visiting boatmen that set down on The Quays pontoon will have a lot to do and see in this town. The conveniently located tourist office in the Sirius Arts Centre, open seven days a week, will be the essential first step to plan a visit to this heritage town.


What facilities are available?
Cork Harbour is a major yachting centre for Ireland and as such you can get everything you need, if not in Cobh, certainly in the harbour area. The main concentration of yachting services is however in the Crosshaven area, and ‘The Quays Bar & Restaurant’ jetty is only suitable as an access point to Cobh town centre. Ashore, Cobh, catering for a population of about 10,000, has almost all you need.

One of Cobh’s particular strengths is transport. It benefits from an hourly direct rail link to Kent Station in Cork City, located on the Lower Glanmire Road, north of the River Lee. Less than 10 minutes’ walk from it is the Cork city bus station. It also has excellent hire car facilities and a host of taxi firms as a result of the many Liners that visit here. The island and the town are linked to the mainland by the R624, which runs southwards from the N25.

All this makes Ireland’s second largest city Cork, 25 km (15 mi) from Cobh, highly accessible with its onward excellent transport connections. Bus Eireann provides a regular national service including an Air Coach bus service from Cork's Parnell Place Bus Station to Cork Airport throughout the week. Cork Airport is conveniently located just 8 kilometres from Cork City Centre.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to a vessel moored alongside The Quays. However this is an open quay and normal security measures should be adhered to.


With thanks to:
Eddie English, Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner Dinghy & Powerboat Trainer at sailcork.com. Photographs with thanks to ‘The Quays Bar & Restaurant’ shotspoof, John Glynn, Chris Murray, Seek New Travel, Padra Martin, Gordon Kinsella, Bjorn Christian Torrissen, derekmenzies, Bkkbrad, William Murphy and Pablo.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.








































This very useful aerial overview of Cork Harbour is highly recommended for first time visitors to familiarise themselves with Cork Harbour:





A good overview of Cobh is available in this short video






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