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Provisioning

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Extending diesel storage capacity in a one off situation, with short funds
Extended cruises require more than a typical yacht's fuel tank capacity and supplementary jerry cans are normal on a blue water cruising yacht. However, there are the occasional peak fuel passages where you are likely to be becalmed for extended periods or are going into areas where fuel is scarce, undependable or is very expensive, where it makes sense to vastly increase your fuel carrying capacity before departing.

Vastly extending the motoring range without modifying the vessel
Extended cruises require more than a typical yacht's fuel tank capacity can cater for and it is often the case that a few particular legs of an extended cruise require an excessive amount of motoring and the requisite fuel. Capacity can be augmented with fuel or ‘Jerry Cans’ but these consume valuable space. Then when the cans are not serving a purpose the bulky empty containers still have to be stored.

Provisioning gas for extended cruising
Most yachts have small gas lockers optimised for small and exchangeable 'liquefied petroleum gas' or 'liquid petroleum gas' (LPG) cylinders. These exchangeable cylinders offer limited capacity and are geared towards local weekend or at best week-long cruising in an area where the bottles are readily exchangeable rather than ongoing live-aboard dependence in remote locations.

Reducing the cost of engine servicing
The life of your engine depends in no small part on the quality of the oil you put in it as that its lifeblood. There is a tendency to play it safe and buy the manufacturer's branded engine oil when it comes to service. This can be disproportionately expensive and add substantially to the annual running cost of a vessel.

Tanking rainwater, harvesting what Mother Nature provides
Freshwater is a necessity for life aboard a vessel. Humans need approximately a ½ litre of water per day to survive and two litres to avoid thirst. Completely clean fresh water can be hard to come by in the tropics. This is particularly the case if you do not have an osmotic watermaker aboard, or choose to do without the attached cost and regular maintenance, and you are cruising in remote areas.

Looking after the vessel's fresh water
Freshwater is a necessity for life aboard a vessel. Humans need approximately a ½ litre of water per day to survive and two litres to avoid thirst. But we also like to wash with it and clean things with it so we need to obtain and store a large quantity of water aboard.


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