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Illauntannig

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Overview





Illauntannig is the largest of a number of small islands called the Maharee Islands, often called the ‘Seven Hoggs’, situated off the northern shore of the Dingle Peninsula, Co. Kerry, on the west coast of Ireland. The island is situated one nautical mile off the northern end of the of the sandy Castlegregory peninsula that separates Brandon Bay to the west from Tralee Bay on the east.

In fine settled conditions the island offers an exposed anchorage with good holding in sand, on the eastern side abreast of the house. Careful navigation is required as there is a rock in the middle of the bay off the beach called Thurran Rock (often called Wheel Rock) that is steep and dries to 2.5 metres at low water. However the clear visibility of the water makes it very workable.



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Keyfacts for Illauntannig
Approaches
2 stars: Careful navigation; good visibility and conditions with dangers that require careful navigation.
Shelter
2 stars: Exposed; unattended vessels should be watched from the shore and a comfortable overnight stay is unlikely.



Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
(None)


Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Now Force

Summary

An exposed location with careful navigation required for access.

LWS draught

2 metres (6.56 feet).

Today's tide estimates

HW 05:22 (4.6m) LW 11:52 (0.4m)
HW 18:04 (4.7m) LW 21:38 (0.3m)
We are now on Springs

Swell today




Approaches
2 stars: Careful navigation; good visibility and conditions with dangers that require careful navigation.
Shelter
2 stars: Exposed; unattended vessels should be watched from the shore and a comfortable overnight stay is unlikely.



Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
(None)


Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 19.628' N, 010° 1.085' W

Off the beach on Illauntannig approximately half way between the house and the Monastic settlement site.

What are the initial fixes?

The following waypoints will set up a final approach:

(i) East Magharee Sound initial fix

52° 18.513' N, 009° 55.866' W

Transit convergence point of 106° from Church Hill and 354° off Kerry Head.

(ii) West Magharee Sound initial fix

52° 19.000' N, 010° 5.000' W

North of Brandon Bay.

(iii) Central Magharee Sound - Illauntannig initial fix

52° 19.350' N, 010° 1.070' W

In the middle Magharee Sound between Rough Point and Island.
Please note

Initial fixes only set up their listed targets. Do not plan to sail directly between initial fixes as a routing sequence.





Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Illauntannig for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Scraggane Bay - 0.7 miles SSW
  2. Castlegregory - 2.4 miles S
  3. Barrow Harbour - 3.5 miles ESE
  4. Brandon Bay - 3.9 miles SW
  5. Fenit Harbour - 4.2 miles ESE
  6. Dingle Harbour - 9.2 miles SW
  7. Smerwick Harbour - 9.7 miles WSW
  8. Kilbaha Bay - 9.7 miles NNE
  9. Ross Bay - 10.2 miles NNE
  10. Ventry Harbour - 11.2 miles SW
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Scraggane Bay - 0.7 miles SSW
  2. Castlegregory - 2.4 miles S
  3. Barrow Harbour - 3.5 miles ESE
  4. Brandon Bay - 3.9 miles SW
  5. Fenit Harbour - 4.2 miles ESE
  6. Dingle Harbour - 9.2 miles SW
  7. Smerwick Harbour - 9.7 miles WSW
  8. Kilbaha Bay - 9.7 miles NNE
  9. Ross Bay - 10.2 miles NNE
  10. Ventry Harbour - 11.2 miles SW
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


How to get in?
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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Route location The 'Sybil Point to Loop Head' coastal description provides approach information to the suggested initial fix. Vessels approaching from the south should select the northbound Route location sequenced description; vessels approaching from the north should select the southbound Route location sequence; western approaches may use either description.

Either description may be used for the River Shannon where the forty three miles from the entrance to Limerick City are detailed.

Initial fix location From the middle of Maharee Sound initial fix proceed north. Keep one hundred metres off the island and you should be clear of Thurran Rock on your east side.

Haven location Anchor right off the beach half way between the monastic settlement and the dwelling house (see photos below) in sand with good holding in two metres. Another popular location to anchor is where the local house owner moors his Currach that is often marked on Admiralty charts (also marked on the chartlet below).

Landing is easy at the steep, sandy beach on the east side.



What's the story here?
The Magharee islands (in Irish, Oilehin an Mhachaire from the Irish na Machairí meaning a cultivated coastal raised dune system immediately inside an exposed sandy beach, behind which there is often a flat grassy area) are also known in English as the Seven Hogs (Na Seacht gCeanna).

The islands are uninhabited, except for holiday visitors. The two largest islands, Illauntannig and Illaunimmil, were inhabited in the past and are still grazed by sheep and cattle during the summer months. The islands are privately owned and ‘Illauntannig’ has a summer home with outhouses on the northeastern side of the island.

Illauntannig (Irish Oileán tSeanaigh) acquired it’s named after Saint Senach who reputedly founded the early Christian monastery on the island in the 7th century along with Kilshannig on the mainland. The visible remains are substantial and situated just south of the anchorage within thick, curving cashal walls. They consist of a well preserved souterrain about forty metres in length, leading into the central site that includes two oratories, three beehive (or Clochan) huts and three examples of a leacht (or altar), all within an enclosing wall. Beside one of the platforms is a stone cross 1.8m high with bevelled edges albeit undecorated. A bronze-coated iron hand-bell displayed in the National Museum of Ireland came from a recess in one of the walls.

The area teems with bird and other wildlife. The island is generally quite flat and grassy making it ideal for Oyster Catcher and Tern (mostly Arctic) to nest. The surrounding waters have great underwater visibility and offer excellent diving. Basking Shark and Blue Shark are reputed to be common in these waters in the summer months. Two small adjoining islands, Illaunboe and Reennafardarrig, can be reached by foot from Illauntannig at low tide, but make sure you know exactly what the tide is doing.

From a sailing perspective, if you are daunted by the prospect of getting on to the Skelligs then the Illauntannig monastic site is the lazy mans answer to getting an idea of what is like. As in the photo there is a plaque at the location providing more details of the history than are listed here. Illauntannig is also an ideal spot to sit out a tide if you are bound for the Shannon estuary and do not want to go all the way to Fenit and out again.


What facilities are available?
None


Any security concerns?
No incident known to have occurred at this remote anchorage.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fixes' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.


























The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Illauntannig.


The following video presents information about Illauntannig.




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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.