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Greer’s Quay

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Overview





Greer’s Quay is an isolated pier located near the head of Carlingford Lough inlet which is set into Ireland's northeast coastline. It offers a good anchorage close off the pier and, for vessels that can take to the hard, the possibility of drying out alongside. Moorings are also reported to be available in the area.

Greer’s Quay is an isolated pier located near the head of Carlingford Lough inlet which is set into Ireland's northeast coastline. It offers a good anchorage close off the pier and, for vessels that can take to the hard, the possibility of drying out alongside. Moorings are also reported to be available in the area.

Greer’s Quay is a good anchorage. However, like most locations in Carlingford Lough, it is exposed to south-easterly conditions. With a large open expanse up to Warrenpoint, Greer’s Quay is also open to the northwest and in either of these conditions, the adjacent Carlingford Marina or the Port of Warrenpoint may be a better option. The entire inlet is also subject to heavy squalls descending from the hills in northwest winds. The pier may be accessed via Warrenpoint Port’s illuminated deep water shipping channel which runs the entire length of the lough. Though there is little to concern in the area surrounding the pier, careful navigation is generally required for this location owing to exceptional currents in the lower lough and at the entrance.



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Keyfacts for Greer’s Quay
Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 5 or more from NE, ENE, E, ESE and SE.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: strong to overwhelming tides in the localityNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
2 stars: Careful navigation; good visibility and conditions with dangers that require careful navigation.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
August 4th 2022

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with careful navigation required for access.

Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 5 or more from NE, ENE, E, ESE and SE.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: strong to overwhelming tides in the localityNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways



Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 4.393' N, 006° 14.031' W

The pierhead at Greer’s Quay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Carlingford Lough Entrance Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
54° 0.100' N, 006° 2.052' W
500 metres due south of Hellyhunter, a south cardinal buoy Q(6) +FL1.15s. From here the line of the entrance’s leading light beacons may be picked up.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location. Use the directions provided for Warrenpoint Click to view haven for approaches and the run up the Lough.
  • Plan the approach to be at slack water, preferably low water. Tides in the entrance attain rates of up to 5 kn making it virtually impossible for a displacement leisure craft to enter or leave against the tide.

  • Carlingford Lough's entrance channel and the dredged channel to Warrenpoint are both narrow channels where sailing vessels of less than 20 metres in length cannot impede ships in transit.

  • From the entrance follow the well buoyed and lit commercial channel up the length of the inlet.

  • When Warrenpoint's entrance channel marker is drawing near break off for the pier and anchor out to the northeast of the pierhead.



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Greer’s Quay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Omeath - 1.2 nautical miles NNW
  2. Rostrevor - 1.4 nautical miles NE
  3. Warrenpoint - 1.5 nautical miles NNW
  4. Killowen - 1.6 nautical miles E
  5. Carlingford Marina - 2 nautical miles SE
  6. Carlingford Harbour - 2.6 nautical miles SE
  7. Greencastle - 5.1 nautical miles ESE
  8. Giles Quay - 5.3 nautical miles S
  9. Dundalk - 6.7 nautical miles SW
  10. Newry - 6.8 nautical miles NNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Omeath - 1.2 miles NNW
  2. Rostrevor - 1.4 miles NE
  3. Warrenpoint - 1.5 miles NNW
  4. Killowen - 1.6 miles E
  5. Carlingford Marina - 2 miles SE
  6. Carlingford Harbour - 2.6 miles SE
  7. Greencastle - 5.1 miles ESE
  8. Giles Quay - 5.3 miles S
  9. Dundalk - 6.7 miles SW
  10. Newry - 6.8 miles NNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Greer's Quay on the southern shore of Carlingford Lough
Image: Michael Harpur


Greer’s Quay is an isolated pier located near the head of the Carlingford Lough inlet on the southwestern shore. The pier dries out completely at low water but depths are good on approach and water can always be found for landing at the head of the pier.


How to get in?
Greer's Quay with Warrenpoint in the backdrop
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance PointUse the directions provided for Warrenpoint Click to view haven for approaches and the run up the lough. When the No. 25 Starboard Light buoy, marking the dredged channel to Warrenpoint, is drawing near it is possible to turn off to port and cut directly to the anchoring area off the pier.


Greer's Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Anchor according to draft off the pierhead in mud. Expect 2 metres LWS to be available about 200 metres northeast of the pierhead.


The quay dries but there is always water available for a landing at the its head
Image: Michael Harpur


The pier dries out but 1.5 metres is always available at the very end of the pierhead. Therefore it is possible to comfortably land here at all stages of the tide. The inner area of the pier dries but has 4 metres at high water making it useful for vessels that can take to the hard.


Why visit here?
Greer's Quay is named after the local landowner Robert Walker Greer. Greer was the local landlord who commissioned the construction of the quay in the 1840s to help develop Carlingford Lough’s fishing industry.


Greers Quay was built in the 1840s
Image: Michael Harpur


Soon after 'A picturesque handbook to Carlingford Bay and the watering places within its vicinity'- circa 1840, noted "A little farther on, below the Ryland Water, is a small pier, erected within the last five years, at the joint expense of the Government and of the Marquis of Anglesey. It is in a little cove and affords shelter to the fishing smacks, which seek its friendly protection from the wintry storms".


The DNGR passed along the shoreline above - now the Greenway
Image: Michael Harpur


But things did not entirely go to plan for Robert Walker Greer. He had built the elegant mansion of Ballyoonan House upon 14 acres of the shores of Carlingford Lough and he planned to spend his retirement here. But in 1873 the Dundalk, Newry, Greenore Railway, (DNGR) built a railway to provide a link between the towns in its title. These connected along the coast to the North Western Railway port at Greenore from where a ferry service operated to Holyhead. 'White's Crossing', which then became 'White's Halt', allowed railway access to the pier. But the service puffed and steamed it's way right past Greer’s beautiful home. It so destroyed his peaceful abode that Greer depart for a town residence in Leeson Park, Dublin where he passed away unexpectedly in 1876.


The pier anchorage is short distance from Warrenpoint
Image: Michael Harpur


Ballyoonan House was later bought by the Rosminians and became St. Michael’s College. Now it is the Tain Holiday village water sports location. The railway thrived for half a century but from 1923 onwards it fell into progressive decline. As steam trains are expensive to run, the Great Northern Railway introduced cheaper 'railbuses' when it took over running the line in 1933. But it could not arrest the decline and the decision was made to finally close the railway in 1951. The route of the former DNGR railway is today the Carlingford Lough Greenway. Little has changed for stone-built Greer's Quay since it was built and remains in good condition supporting a fishing vessel and several small angling boats.


The pier still serves the fishermen of the Lough to this day
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating perspective, Greer's Quay offers another anchoring location from which to enjoy the Cooley Peninsula and the Lough itself. Nestled in the picturesque sequestered setting Greer’s Quay provides another good anchorage and all tide tender landings at the head of the quay. It is an ideal location to strike off for a walk along the Greenway or out through the open countryside. The small village of Omeath is a two-mile stroll.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities at Greer’s Quay except for a high water launching slip, and there are reportedly local moorings in the area. At Omeath, a distance of approximately two miles, there is a very small village that has a restaurant, pub, basic provisions, gas, and a petrol station.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred at Greer’s Quay.


With thanks to:
Brian McJury, Warrenpoint Harbour Master.







Aerial views od the northwest end of the Lough




Northern Ireland tourist board overview of Carlingford Lough


About Greer’s Quay

Greer's Quay is named after the local landowner Robert Walker Greer. Greer was the local landlord who commissioned the construction of the quay in the 1840s to help develop Carlingford Lough’s fishing industry.


Greers Quay was built in the 1840s
Image: Michael Harpur


Soon after 'A picturesque handbook to Carlingford Bay and the watering places within its vicinity'- circa 1840, noted "A little farther on, below the Ryland Water, is a small pier, erected within the last five years, at the joint expense of the Government and of the Marquis of Anglesey. It is in a little cove and affords shelter to the fishing smacks, which seek its friendly protection from the wintry storms".


The DNGR passed along the shoreline above - now the Greenway
Image: Michael Harpur


But things did not entirely go to plan for Robert Walker Greer. He had built the elegant mansion of Ballyoonan House upon 14 acres of the shores of Carlingford Lough and he planned to spend his retirement here. But in 1873 the Dundalk, Newry, Greenore Railway, (DNGR) built a railway to provide a link between the towns in its title. These connected along the coast to the North Western Railway port at Greenore from where a ferry service operated to Holyhead. 'White's Crossing', which then became 'White's Halt', allowed railway access to the pier. But the service puffed and steamed it's way right past Greer’s beautiful home. It so destroyed his peaceful abode that Greer depart for a town residence in Leeson Park, Dublin where he passed away unexpectedly in 1876.


The pier anchorage is short distance from Warrenpoint
Image: Michael Harpur


Ballyoonan House was later bought by the Rosminians and became St. Michael’s College. Now it is the Tain Holiday village water sports location. The railway thrived for half a century but from 1923 onwards it fell into progressive decline. As steam trains are expensive to run, the Great Northern Railway introduced cheaper 'railbuses' when it took over running the line in 1933. But it could not arrest the decline and the decision was made to finally close the railway in 1951. The route of the former DNGR railway is today the Carlingford Lough Greenway. Little has changed for stone-built Greer's Quay since it was built and remains in good condition supporting a fishing vessel and several small angling boats.


The pier still serves the fishermen of the Lough to this day
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating perspective, Greer's Quay offers another anchoring location from which to enjoy the Cooley Peninsula and the Lough itself. Nestled in the picturesque sequestered setting Greer’s Quay provides another good anchorage and all tide tender landings at the head of the quay. It is an ideal location to strike off for a walk along the Greenway or out through the open countryside. The small village of Omeath is a two-mile stroll.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Carlingford Marina - 1.2 miles SE
Carlingford Harbour - 1.6 miles SE
Giles Quay - 3.3 miles S
Dundalk - 4.2 miles SW
Port Oriel (Clogher Head) - 10.2 miles S
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Omeath - 0.7 miles NNW
Newry - 4.2 miles NNW
Warrenpoint - 1 miles NNW
Rostrevor - 0.9 miles NE
Killowen - 1 miles E

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Greer’s Quay.






















Aerial views od the northwest end of the Lough




Northern Ireland tourist board overview of Carlingford Lough



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