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Ardglass Harbour (Phennick Cove Marina)

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Overview





Ardglass Harbour is located on the northeastern coast of Ireland, three miles northeast of St John’s Point and six miles south of the entrance to Strangford Lough. It is a busy small fishing port with a marina alongside that provides all services for leisure craft.

Ardglass Harbour is located on the northeastern coast of Ireland, three miles northeast of St John’s Point and six miles south of the entrance to Strangford Lough. It is a busy small fishing port with a marina alongside that provides all services for leisure craft.

Ardglass offers a vessel complete protection. Access is straightforward in all reasonable offshore conditions, on any state of the tide, night or day. It is best avoided in an onshore gale and especially one from the southeast.
Please note

Although the harbour is supported by leading lights, it would not be prudent for a newcomer to approach Ardglass for the first time at night. The area is subject to silting and vessels carrying a draft should take it steady when operating at low water. It is inadvisable to anchor when winds are from the southeast or berth alongside the south pier during gales from east round to the south, as it is subject to overtopping waves and swell.




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Keyfacts for Ardglass Harbour (Phennick Cove Marina)



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredMarine engineering services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaHandicapped access supported


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 8 or more from ENE, E, ESE, SE, SSE and S.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: may only reasonably accommodate vessels less than a specific lengthNote: harbour fees may be charged



 +44 28 4484 2332     HM  +44 284484 1291      ardglassmarina@tiscali.co.uk      Ch.M 80, 12 & 37
Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 15.655' N, 005° 36.150' W

On the position of the South Pier's navigation lights Fl R 3s 5M situated at the pier’s northern or outer end.

What is the initial fix?

The following Ardglass Harbour Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
54° 15.350' N, 005° 35.474' W
Half a mile out from the head of the South Pier in the middle of the white sector of the leading lights (308º - 314º, Iso. WRG 4s, a 10 metre tower visible for 8 miles). A course of 311º T will lead into the harbour from the initial fix.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details for vessels approaching Strangford Lough from the north are available in the northeast Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Malin Head to Strangford Lough Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the south are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location.

  • Track in on a bearing of 311° T towards the 10-metre high sectored light tower on North Pier at the head of the inlet.

  • Keep at least 200 metres off the headlands.

  • Stand off the end of the South Pier when passing and pick up the marked channel into the marina.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Ardglass Harbour (Phennick Cove Marina) for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Killough Harbour - 0.8 miles WSW
  2. Kilclief Bay - 3.1 miles NNE
  3. Cross Roads - 3.5 miles NNE
  4. Strangford Harbour (Strangford Village) - 4.3 miles NNE
  5. South of Salt Island - 4.3 miles NNW
  6. Quoile - 4.4 miles NNW
  7. Between Rat & Salt Island - 4.4 miles NNW
  8. Audley's Roads - 4.4 miles N
  9. Brandy Bay - 4.5 miles NNW
  10. West of Jackdaw Island - 4.5 miles N
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Killough Harbour - 0.8 miles WSW
  2. Kilclief Bay - 3.1 miles NNE
  3. Cross Roads - 3.5 miles NNE
  4. Strangford Harbour (Strangford Village) - 4.3 miles NNE
  5. South of Salt Island - 4.3 miles NNW
  6. Quoile - 4.4 miles NNW
  7. Between Rat & Salt Island - 4.4 miles NNW
  8. Audley's Roads - 4.4 miles N
  9. Brandy Bay - 4.5 miles NNW
  10. West of Jackdaw Island - 4.5 miles N
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?


Ardglass Harbour is a busy and important fishing port with a village and marina. The harbour is set into the rocky inlet of Phennick Cove which gives the marina its name although it is more commonly know as Ardglass Marina. This, in turn, is divided by a rocky outcrop that separates the marina from the fishing harbour. Both are protected by the South Pier, a high armoured breakwater with quays on the inner side. The marina is on the west side of the harbour and is protected from the east by a detached breakwater on the west side. Marina access is through a marked channel. Further within, at the head of the inlet, is a dry dock in which small vessels may take to the mud in perfect safety.


Vessels planning on approaching the harbour must notify the harbour master to avoid a collision. A radio watch is maintained on VHF Channel 12 | P: +44 28 4484 1291 | M: +44 79 9064 8274 Normal Working Hours: Mon – Thur: 8am to 5.00pm, Fri: 8am to 5.00pm (excluding statutory holidays). Once clearance is provided proceed in.


Convergance Point There are no offline dangers in the approaches to the inlet. Keeping 200 metres off the rocks clears all dangers. The promontory of Ringfad, between Killough and Ardglass, is distinguished by a conical hill surmounted by Isabella Tower, as well as a water tower and Ardglass church steeple. These marks point out the harbour for seaward approaches.
Please note

Phennick Cove is much smaller and less significant from seaward than its close south neighbour Killough Harbour. Make certain that the correct inlet has been identified before making an approach.




Initial fix location From the Ardglass harbour initial fix track in on a course of 311° T towards the 10-metre high sectored light tower on North Pier. This is on the head of the inner pier situated about 400 metres northwest of the head of South Pier near the head of the inlet. At night this shows a white sector light 308°- 314°.


This track will lead around the head of the South Pier and is the middle of the night-time leading light white sector. It is important to keep on track during the approach giving the shore a wide berth. Although the fairway is 100 metres wide there are rocks on either side.

From a seaward approach, the South Pier breakwater is high and made conspicuous by a large grey fish processing plant with a bright tin roof situated at its western foot. South Pier also has considerable armouring units that make the harbour highly discernable from seaward and differentiates it from Killough’s Pier.

The eastern shore of Phennick Point is steep-to, but abreast of the pier the rocks uncover out to 200 metres from the shore. A conical concrete beacon marks the outside edge of these rocks that are passed to starboard. Likewise, keep clear of the head of the South Pier itself as it is covered with protective rock armour that extends out from the pierhead. The outer end of this is marked by a lit red top-marked black pile.

If approaching the fishing harbour turn to port around the head of the South Pier and keep Churn Rock to starboard. This is a central visible harbour rock west of the harbour and fairway marked by a south cardinal beacon.



The marina is approximately 120 metres further in and vessels should alter course northward from the head of the South Pier. Pass to the northeast of Churn Rock keeping it well clear to port and track to pass a red buoy to port. Alter course to a northwest direction and pass a west cardinal to starboard. Then a red buoy Red Light Buoy Q.R., close by, should be rounded to port where the narrow marina access channel opens to the southwest.



The channel is marked by buoys and has a maintained depth of 3.16 metres. Favour the channels port hand marks and pass into the marina behind the rock armoury breakwater that divides the harbour between the fish harbour and marina area.

Haven location The marina has approximately eighty chain fixed pontoon berths. Twenty of which are reserved for visiting yachts and are open 24 hours a day. It is advisable to check availability before entering; office hours VHF: Ch 37 and 80 | P: +44284 484 2332.

Depths vary from 1.66 to 3.16 metres. Space is constrained and there is little manoeuvring space so larger yachts will find it very difficult to negotiate especially in strong winds. Berth as directed in advance by the harbour master.

Due to the level of fishing activity and space constrictions, it is preferable that visiting craft use the marina. However, it is possible to berth alongside the quay on the inner side of South Pier or in settled times anchor in the harbour. Expect to find 3 metres between South Pier and Churn Rock.
Please note

No berthing or anchoring in the harbour area should take place without first consulting the Harbour Master and obtaining his consent.





Southeast winds tend to send a heavy swell into Ardglass, and there is one other location that offers complete protection. This is a small inner tidal basin to the west of the North Pier that carries three metres at high water.

Known as "God's Pocket" it provides absolute protection and is the traditional hide for fishing boats in gales from east round to south. Leisure vessels may lie on its bottom of soft mud keeping close along the north side of the North Pier on approach.
Please note

It is essential to have good fenders or even better a fender board to protect the topsides from the stones of the dock walls as craft settle in the mud.




Why visit here?
Ardglass derives its name from the Gaelic Ard Ghlais that means the "green high place". It is a busy fishing port and has been for nearly 5000 years.

The natural deep-water harbour was in use as far back as 3,000 years BC by the Celts. They used it before turning to trade and farming for sustenance and left evidence of their occupation in earthworks and artefacts. Little trace has been found of Ardglass’ occupation for the first millennium. Considering its nearness to bases at Strangford and Carlingford it is thought probable that the Vikings would have used this conveniently positioned natural harbour on their travels. Ardglass’s first recorded mention in history dates back to 1172 and the Anglo-Norman invasion. Then John de Courcey moved north from Dublin, with 22 knights and 300 soldiers, fighting battles with local Irish chieftains and conquering lands all the way. Arriving in this area he saw the strategic importance of the harbour. Establishing his headquarters in Downpatrick in 1178 he incorporated Ardglass into his domain for sea communications. The Jordans were awarded Ardglass where they built their castle.

The port slowly grew from a place of little note in the 13th century to a prosperous and strategically important commercial port in the 15th century. It received a charter at this time giving it a portreeve or mayor, a port admiral and revenue officers. This was largely as a result of a London Trading Company establishing itself in the village during the reign of Henry VIII, and by the 15th-century the harbour handled more trade than any other port in the province of Ulster. During this period a cluster of castles were built connected by a fortified wall. The wall protected the harbour area from attacks, the tower houses defended the town and the fortified warehouses protected the trade goods.


During the various civil wars of Ireland, Ardglass’s castles frequently changed hands. About the year 1578 Sir Nicholas Bagnal, Marshal of Ireland took them from the O'Neils who put up a rigorous resistance. Bagnal placed a strong garrison here to protect it and two decades later it was tested by Hugh O’Neill, Earl of Tyrone, when he lay siege to the castle’s owner of the time Simon Jordan during the Tyrone rebellion. He held out for three years until he was finally rescued by sea in 1601. The castle fell again to the Irish during the bloody 1641 Rebellion who damaged and almost destroyed Ardglass.


The 17th century saw large-scale Scots migration to Ulster. Known as ‘The Plantation of Ulster’, it largely took place in the first decades of the 1600's and then tailed off. It was thought that immigration may have risen sharply, perhaps as the result of bad harvests in Scotland in the latter half of the 1630’s, and this precipitated the bloody 1641 rising. Oddly, the rising was not initiated by Scottish migration or by local displacement or subjugation, nor by Ulster affairs. Perversely the rebellion’s leaders came from these immigrants. Its genesis came from events in London and their loyalty to the king. At the time it seemed that Parliament was gaining ascendancy over Charles the 1st and the newly formed Scottish controllers planned on seizing control of Ireland for the King. But they entirely underestimated the deep resentments caused by the inequality of their plantation. When they rose up and struck what they thought would be a surgical strike and coup they quickly lost control of the initiative. To their horror, they watched as the event turned against them and transformed into a bloody rising of Ulster’s rebel Catholic elements. These then turned upon Protestant settlers, massacring them in large numbers. Ardglass took the brunt of this rising and suffered severe damage. Its trade was significantly diminished with some of it switching to neighbouring Killough.


In 1812 William Ogilvie acquired Ardglass Castle and estate for £26,000. He spent a lot of time and took great interest in Ardglass. Ogilvie built the town’s first major harbour including the tidal North Dock to encourage trade. He also had the fine buildings in Castle Place, donated land for the Catholic Church and built the Church of Ireland St. Nicholas between 1812 -1815 - in the chancel of which his remains rest. The harbour was further extended and a lighthouse was built following an act of parliament in 1813. Unfortunately, a great storm in 1838 washed away the lighthouse and the end of the pier. This was replaced by the present metal structure and work on the current harbour piers was completed in 1885. Beneath this, light sailboats harboured during seasons of plentiful catches of herring, whiting and cod. The sails began to be replaced by steam engines around the turn of the last century. Harvesting and the processing of fish and shellfish still represents a major part of the area’s economy.


Today the village is a commuter centre for workers in Downpatrick and Belfast, with a large scale fish processing industry exporting fish and prawns to European countries, and Russia. The remnants of the town’s historic fortifications, some of which are now mere ruins, are linked by a town path. Of the ring of fortifications erected around Ardglass, only the smaller Jordan’s Castle remains largely unchanged. The larger King's Castle was originally built in the 12th century, and additions were made at various times over the centuries, ... the largest of the many ancient castles of Ardglass it was a fortress of considerable size and strength; but is at present much dilapidated, and falling into decay as the Dublin Penny Journal of 30 March 1833 recorded. It was restored in 1988 and is now a nursing home. These and much more survive to communicate that this was once Ulster's busiest 15th-century port.


A brief walk will take a visitor past these and other fortified tower houses that provide the town with historic character. The Phennick Cove Marina is an ideal starting point for a pleasant walk through this great legacy. A wall, believed to be part of a linked defensive wall built around the harbour, stretches from Newark, derived from ‘new works’, at the harbour entrance, to Cowd's Castle, at the entrance to Ardglass Golf Club. Then opposite Cowd's Castle to Margaret's at the southern end of the Castle Place. From there to Kildare Street and Jordan's Castle, that takes a central position overlooking the harbour and is the most imposing of a ring of towers. Finally to the larger King's Castle situated higher up the hill of Ardglass at the top of Kildare Street. All of which are within an easy walk.


Also of interest is Ardglass Castle that was probably a row of warehouses. Large sections of the original building can still be seen within the modern clubhouse of Ardglass Golf Club. Isabella’s Tower, visible on entry on the top of a conical hill, is a folly built for a handicapped daughter that marks Ardglass’ highest point.




Ardtole Church on the outskirts of Ardglass, on the high ground about 2 km to the northeast, is another point of historical interest. The ruins of the ancient church of Ardtole, dedicated to St. Nicholas are long and narrow with a huge easterly window. This was formerly the parish church of Ardglass but was abandoned in 15th-century after a massacre. Legend has it that the McCartans clan massacred the congregation at worship here to avenge an insult offered to their chief. The burgesses of Ardglass had fastened his long hair to briars while he lay in a drunken sleep. Jonathan Swift used this story in his novel "Gulliver's Travels". It is a worthwhile visit simply for the pleasure of walking out to the Green Road to behold the fine view of Coney Island, the Mountains of Mourne and seaward views out over the Isle of Man.

From a sailing point of view Ardglass is a key sailing location. It combines the fully featured Phennick Cove Marina that offers complete protection, with quick and straightforward seaward access at any stage of the tide. This makes it a very good stopover for yachts northbound or southbound in the Irish Sea. Add to this its situation, just six miles south of the Strangford Lough entrance and twenty miles northeast of Carlingford, makes it the ideal staging berth to time a favourable tide entrance into either of these loughs.


What facilities are available?
Diesel fuel, fresh water, gas, showers, launderette, electric etc are all available at the marina and almost all other provisions can be had from the town (population approximately 1700) including banking and post office. Limited boat repairs can be undertaken here and there is service for radar, Decca and radio. Belfast international airport is 67 km away. 11 kilometres to the northwest is the larger town of Downpatrick that serves as a commercial and administrative centre for the locality. Ulsterbus 16A serves Killough and Ardglass.


Any security concerns?
None, as the marina is a secured area.


With thanks to:
Michael Young - Harbour Master Kilkeel. Photography with thanks to Ardfern, Eric Jones and Albert Bridge.


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




















































The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Ardglass.


The following video presents a helicopter flight over Ardglass and the coast.





The following video presents an overview of Ardglass bay from Ardtole.





The following video presents a fishing boat leaving Ardglass harbour on a bit of a grey day.



About Ardglass Harbour (Phennick Cove Marina)

Ardglass derives its name from the Gaelic Ard Ghlais that means the "green high place". It is a busy fishing port and has been for nearly 5000 years.

The natural deep-water harbour was in use as far back as 3,000 years BC by the Celts. They used it before turning to trade and farming for sustenance and left evidence of their occupation in earthworks and artefacts. Little trace has been found of Ardglass’ occupation for the first millennium. Considering its nearness to bases at Strangford and Carlingford it is thought probable that the Vikings would have used this conveniently positioned natural harbour on their travels. Ardglass’s first recorded mention in history dates back to 1172 and the Anglo-Norman invasion. Then John de Courcey moved north from Dublin, with 22 knights and 300 soldiers, fighting battles with local Irish chieftains and conquering lands all the way. Arriving in this area he saw the strategic importance of the harbour. Establishing his headquarters in Downpatrick in 1178 he incorporated Ardglass into his domain for sea communications. The Jordans were awarded Ardglass where they built their castle.

The port slowly grew from a place of little note in the 13th century to a prosperous and strategically important commercial port in the 15th century. It received a charter at this time giving it a portreeve or mayor, a port admiral and revenue officers. This was largely as a result of a London Trading Company establishing itself in the village during the reign of Henry VIII, and by the 15th-century the harbour handled more trade than any other port in the province of Ulster. During this period a cluster of castles were built connected by a fortified wall. The wall protected the harbour area from attacks, the tower houses defended the town and the fortified warehouses protected the trade goods.


During the various civil wars of Ireland, Ardglass’s castles frequently changed hands. About the year 1578 Sir Nicholas Bagnal, Marshal of Ireland took them from the O'Neils who put up a rigorous resistance. Bagnal placed a strong garrison here to protect it and two decades later it was tested by Hugh O’Neill, Earl of Tyrone, when he lay siege to the castle’s owner of the time Simon Jordan during the Tyrone rebellion. He held out for three years until he was finally rescued by sea in 1601. The castle fell again to the Irish during the bloody 1641 Rebellion who damaged and almost destroyed Ardglass.


The 17th century saw large-scale Scots migration to Ulster. Known as ‘The Plantation of Ulster’, it largely took place in the first decades of the 1600's and then tailed off. It was thought that immigration may have risen sharply, perhaps as the result of bad harvests in Scotland in the latter half of the 1630’s, and this precipitated the bloody 1641 rising. Oddly, the rising was not initiated by Scottish migration or by local displacement or subjugation, nor by Ulster affairs. Perversely the rebellion’s leaders came from these immigrants. Its genesis came from events in London and their loyalty to the king. At the time it seemed that Parliament was gaining ascendancy over Charles the 1st and the newly formed Scottish controllers planned on seizing control of Ireland for the King. But they entirely underestimated the deep resentments caused by the inequality of their plantation. When they rose up and struck what they thought would be a surgical strike and coup they quickly lost control of the initiative. To their horror, they watched as the event turned against them and transformed into a bloody rising of Ulster’s rebel Catholic elements. These then turned upon Protestant settlers, massacring them in large numbers. Ardglass took the brunt of this rising and suffered severe damage. Its trade was significantly diminished with some of it switching to neighbouring Killough.


In 1812 William Ogilvie acquired Ardglass Castle and estate for £26,000. He spent a lot of time and took great interest in Ardglass. Ogilvie built the town’s first major harbour including the tidal North Dock to encourage trade. He also had the fine buildings in Castle Place, donated land for the Catholic Church and built the Church of Ireland St. Nicholas between 1812 -1815 - in the chancel of which his remains rest. The harbour was further extended and a lighthouse was built following an act of parliament in 1813. Unfortunately, a great storm in 1838 washed away the lighthouse and the end of the pier. This was replaced by the present metal structure and work on the current harbour piers was completed in 1885. Beneath this, light sailboats harboured during seasons of plentiful catches of herring, whiting and cod. The sails began to be replaced by steam engines around the turn of the last century. Harvesting and the processing of fish and shellfish still represents a major part of the area’s economy.


Today the village is a commuter centre for workers in Downpatrick and Belfast, with a large scale fish processing industry exporting fish and prawns to European countries, and Russia. The remnants of the town’s historic fortifications, some of which are now mere ruins, are linked by a town path. Of the ring of fortifications erected around Ardglass, only the smaller Jordan’s Castle remains largely unchanged. The larger King's Castle was originally built in the 12th century, and additions were made at various times over the centuries, ... the largest of the many ancient castles of Ardglass it was a fortress of considerable size and strength; but is at present much dilapidated, and falling into decay as the Dublin Penny Journal of 30 March 1833 recorded. It was restored in 1988 and is now a nursing home. These and much more survive to communicate that this was once Ulster's busiest 15th-century port.


A brief walk will take a visitor past these and other fortified tower houses that provide the town with historic character. The Phennick Cove Marina is an ideal starting point for a pleasant walk through this great legacy. A wall, believed to be part of a linked defensive wall built around the harbour, stretches from Newark, derived from ‘new works’, at the harbour entrance, to Cowd's Castle, at the entrance to Ardglass Golf Club. Then opposite Cowd's Castle to Margaret's at the southern end of the Castle Place. From there to Kildare Street and Jordan's Castle, that takes a central position overlooking the harbour and is the most imposing of a ring of towers. Finally to the larger King's Castle situated higher up the hill of Ardglass at the top of Kildare Street. All of which are within an easy walk.


Also of interest is Ardglass Castle that was probably a row of warehouses. Large sections of the original building can still be seen within the modern clubhouse of Ardglass Golf Club. Isabella’s Tower, visible on entry on the top of a conical hill, is a folly built for a handicapped daughter that marks Ardglass’ highest point.




Ardtole Church on the outskirts of Ardglass, on the high ground about 2 km to the northeast, is another point of historical interest. The ruins of the ancient church of Ardtole, dedicated to St. Nicholas are long and narrow with a huge easterly window. This was formerly the parish church of Ardglass but was abandoned in 15th-century after a massacre. Legend has it that the McCartans clan massacred the congregation at worship here to avenge an insult offered to their chief. The burgesses of Ardglass had fastened his long hair to briars while he lay in a drunken sleep. Jonathan Swift used this story in his novel "Gulliver's Travels". It is a worthwhile visit simply for the pleasure of walking out to the Green Road to behold the fine view of Coney Island, the Mountains of Mourne and seaward views out over the Isle of Man.

From a sailing point of view Ardglass is a key sailing location. It combines the fully featured Phennick Cove Marina that offers complete protection, with quick and straightforward seaward access at any stage of the tide. This makes it a very good stopover for yachts northbound or southbound in the Irish Sea. Add to this its situation, just six miles south of the Strangford Lough entrance and twenty miles northeast of Carlingford, makes it the ideal staging berth to time a favourable tide entrance into either of these loughs.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Killough Harbour - 0.8 miles WSW
Dundrum Harbour - 5.2 miles W
Newcastle Harbour - 6.6 miles WSW
Annalong Harbour - 8.5 miles SW
Kilkeel Harbour - 11.3 miles SW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Kilclief Bay - 3.1 miles NNE
Cross Roads - 3.5 miles NNE
Strangford Harbour (Strangford Village) - 4.3 miles NNE
Audley's Roads - 4.4 miles N
Audley’s Point - 4.6 miles N

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Ardglass Harbour (Phennick Cove Marina).


































The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Ardglass.


The following video presents a helicopter flight over Ardglass and the coast.





The following video presents an overview of Ardglass bay from Ardtole.





The following video presents a fishing boat leaving Ardglass harbour on a bit of a grey day.




A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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