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Bangor Harbour & Marina

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Overview





Bangor is located on the northeast coast of Ireland close inside and on the southern shore of Belfast Lough. It offers a large-scale, full-service marina staffed twenty-four hours a day, which is located in the centre of a principal town.

Bangor is located on the northeast coast of Ireland close inside and on the southern shore of Belfast Lough. It offers a large-scale, full-service marina staffed twenty-four hours a day, which is located in the centre of a principal town.

The marina provides complete protection. With no offlying dangers it affords safe access night or day, at any stage of the tide and in all reasonable conditions.
Please note

Regular fast ferries travel in and out of Belfast Lough. A good watch must be maintained if crossing the entrance to the lough and a vessel should be prepared to be struck unexpectedly by the wash at all times.




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Keyfacts for Bangor Harbour & Marina



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingMSD (marine sanitation device) pump out facilitiesHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require considerationNote: harbour fees may be charged



Berthing  +44 28 9145 3297      kbaird@quaymarinas.com      Ch.11 & 80
Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 40.033' N, 005° 40.330' W

The North Breakwater pierhead at the entrance where a large red pillar beacons stands Iso R 12s 9m 14 M

What is the initial fix?

The following Bangor Harbour Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
54° 40.230' N, 005° 40.330' W
400 metres north of the North Breakwater pierhead at the entrance where a large red pillar beacons stands Iso R 12s 9m 14 M. A bearing of due south leads into the harbour entrance from here.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in the northeast Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Malin Head to Strangford Lough Route location.

  • From the north pass Black Head and the Cloghan Jetty to starboard.

  • From the east pass north of Mew, Lighthouse and Copeland Island keeping them well clear to port.

  • From the south, with a favourable tide, pass between the south side of Copeland Island and the mainland coast through the well-marked Donaghadee Sound shipping fairway.

  • Belfast Lough's navigable area is free of dangers and Bangor Bay has no obstructions.

  • Round the North Breakwater to port, its western side, proceed in and then turn hard to starboard to come in behind the Pickie Breakwater where the marina is situated.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Bangor Harbour & Marina for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Ballyholme Bay - 0.4 miles E
  2. Groomsport - 1.2 miles ENE
  3. Helen’s Bay - 1.3 miles WNW
  4. Port Dandy - 2.8 miles E
  5. Chapel Bay - 2.9 miles E
  6. Donaghadee Harbour - 3.1 miles ESE
  7. Cultra - 3.2 miles W
  8. Copelands Marina - 3.2 miles ESE
  9. Whitehead - 3.3 miles NNW
  10. Carrickfergus Harbour & Marina - 3.4 miles WNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Ballyholme Bay - 0.4 miles E
  2. Groomsport - 1.2 miles ENE
  3. Helen’s Bay - 1.3 miles WNW
  4. Port Dandy - 2.8 miles E
  5. Chapel Bay - 2.9 miles E
  6. Donaghadee Harbour - 3.1 miles ESE
  7. Cultra - 3.2 miles W
  8. Copelands Marina - 3.2 miles ESE
  9. Whitehead - 3.3 miles NNW
  10. Carrickfergus Harbour & Marina - 3.4 miles WNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?


Bangor Harbour and town is situated on the southeast side of Belfast Lough and at the head of Bangor Bay. The third most populous settlement in Northern Ireland, Bangor is a large town fronted by a 560 berth marina, that is the largest marina in Ireland, and the headquarters of several sailing clubs. It is a well-known, frequently used and highly regarded sailing centre.

All visiting vessels are required to contact the Marina office and advise them of their intentions before entering the harbour. P: +44 28 9145 3297 VHF: 37/80 Call sign "Bangor Marina" (24 Hours) A continuous watch is maintained on Channel 11 for Bangor Harbour.

The marina receives many visitors and it is best to have a berth secured before commencing the final approach. Moreover, once inside the harbour, the helmsman will be too occupied finding a berth to manage a VHF dialogue so it is best to have made all arrangements in advance.




Northern Approach Vessels approaching from the north will find few hazards from Larne to the south. Deep water will be found close to the shore with no dangers encountered 300 metres from the rocks. The coast to Black Head, the northern extremity of Belfast Lough marked by a lighthouse, presents a steep perpendicular black basaltic cliff.

Blackhead Lighthouse - Fl 3s 45m 27M position: 54° 46.016’N, 005° 41.338’W

South of Black Head the entrance to the Lough opens 6.75 miles wide between the headland and Orlock Point on the south. Its navigable area is free of dangers with an average depth of 11 metres.

Bangor is six miles south of Black Head and the final length of the journey takes a vessel across the unimpeded waters of Belfast Lough.

Stand well off Cloghan Jetty seen to starboard two miles to the south. This jetty extends out from the north shore for more than half a mile and is lit at the end Fl G 3s 2M. A good mark is to pass to seaward of the green Cloghan Jetty buoy QG situated half a mile beyond the end of the pierhead.

When crossing Belfast Lough the south shore will appear comparatively low and unremarkable except at the bluff at Grey Point which is a 23 metre high point. Bangor’s harbour walls plus the towns dominating steeples will be highly visible whilst tracking down onto the initial fix.


Eastern Approach Vessels arriving from the east will find the Copeland Islands of moderate elevation and distinguished by a lighthouse on the westernmost Mew Island. As with the above, pass well clear to the north of this group.



Southern Approach Vessels arriving from the south may either come up outside the Copelands group or through Donaghadee Sound which is situated between the mainland and the Islands. Copeland Sound, the cut between Copeland Island and Lighthouse plus Mew Islands, is best avoided owing to the two challenging and unmarked rocky shoals called ‘Platters’ and ‘Ninaen Bushes’. ‘Ninaen Bushes’, situated out half a mile off from the northeast point of Copeland Island, is particularly dangerous with less than a metre of cover.



Those approaching outside Copeland Islands should leave Mew Island well clear to Port as the island group lies in shoal water much encumbered with rocks.

Mew Island Lighthouse - Fl (4) 30s 37m 24M position: 54° 41.923’N, 005° 30.824’W

There are tidal races in the vicinity of the group that get highly uncomfortable in strong conditions when they should be avoided. These are the ‘Northern Race’ and ‘Ram Race’ that occur at various stages of the tide to the east of Mew and Copeland Islands.

Once past the group, the run into the initial fix is straightforward across Belfast Lough’s open navigable waters that are free of dangers.




Donaghadee Sound is the normal route for leisure craft making along this coast when tidal streams are favourable. Although the sound is almost a mile wide, between Copeland Island and the mainland to the southwest, foul ground called the Magic Rocks extend nearly half way from Copeland Island’s southwest side. Then Deputy Reef, marked by a red buoy, is situated nearly in the middle of the southern fairway. These constrict the channel through the sound to a quarter of a mile in width.

However, this is well marked for vessels entering and exiting Belfast Lough by the buoyed shipping channel. This is marked by four buoys, port marks off the mainland, starboard off Copeland Island.
Please note

Donaghadee Sound streams achieve 4.5 knots in places so tidal planning is essential and great care should be taken during the approach.





Vessels addressing Donaghadee Sound should align to pass close to the east of the Governor Buoy. This buoy lies about 0.7 of a mile north of Donaghadee Harbour pier and lighthouse that will be a conspicuous mark on the shore.

Governor Red Can Buoy - Fl R 3s position: 54° 39.360’N, 005° 31.991’W

Deputy Green Can Buoy - Fl G 2s position: 54° 39.513’N, 005° 31.944’W

Pass between the Governor and Deputy buoys and from there realign on the Foreland Buoy again passing it on its eastern side.

Foreland Red Can Buoy - Fl R 6s position: 54° 39.640’N, 005° 32.307’W

Continue northwestward to pass at least 250 metres clear of the area to the north of Orlock Point and well east of Belfast Lough’s South Briggs Red Can Buoy located two and a half miles from the Foreland Buoy. The South Briggs buoy marks a dangerous reef extending from the shore.

South Briggs Red Can Buoy – Fl (2) R 10s position: 54° 41.182’N, 005° 35.732’W

From south, Briggs keep a watch out for Club Racing Buoys whilst crossing Groomsport Bay. Keep off Ballymacormick Point and Luke's Point; the eastern and western headlands of Ballyholme Bay immediately east of Bangor Bay itself. Reefs extend from both headlands and it is advisable to keep 500 metres off Ballymacormick Point, which is particularly foul, and 250 metres off Luke's Point whilst closing on Bangor Harbour’s initial fix. A sharp lookout should also be kept for Racing Marks whilst crossing Ballyholme Bay.

As the initial fix draws closer Bangor Bay will be found to be clear of obstructions and approachable from all directions.


Initial fix location From the initial fix the North Breakwater with the red concrete pillar, Red Light. Iso R 12s 9m 14M, at its head will be clearly visible.

The entrance to the Harbour is between two grey concrete breakwaters. The North Breakwater extending west-northwest from the eastern side and behind is the Pickie Breakwater extending 120 metres from the western shore. Expect to find two unusual dolphins standing off the head of the Pickie Breakwater that carry its lights on fixed Green poles, 2F. G (vert) 3M on the outside.



Round the head of the North Breakwater passing it to port, then continue between the two breakwaters until the marina entrance opens on the starboard side enclosed behind the Pickie Breakwater and Central Pier, QW at the pierhead.



Round the dolphins standing off the head of the Pickie Breakwater by turning sharp to starboard, leave the green pole Fl. G. 3s to starboard continuing into the well-lit marina.
Please note

Vessels carrying a draft should stay in the middle at low water.






Haven location Proceed along the inside between Pickie Breakwater and the ends of pontoons ‘H’, ‘G’ and ‘F’. Then turn hard to port to continue between ‘F’ and the western shoreline. Once the third Fl.G Light comes starboard abeam turn to port for pontoon 'E' where the visitor's berths are located on the south facing fingers.

Yachts may lay alongside the North Breakwater and Central Pier in the outer harbour for a short period of time. The vessel should not be left unattended in the outer harbour, and you should be prepared to move if requested.




Why visit here?
Bangor, in Irish Beannchar derives its name from the Gaelic but the precise origin remains uncertain.

The ancient Gaelic text Táin Bó Fraích provides a legendary explanation for Trácht Bennchoir ‘Bangor strand’. Two warriors Fróech and Conall Cernach returned from France to the bay to land a herd of cattle belonging to Fróech. Conall's much loved servant, Bicne mac Láegaire, died on the boat and they called the bay, Bangor Bay today, Inber mBicne after his name. When they subsequently landed the cattle ashore they all shed their horns. Thus the area was given the name Trácht mBennchoir, Trácht, meaning strand, benn, horn, plus cor meaning casting; “the strand of the horn-casting”.

Others believe the name is derived from a combination Beanna, the Irish for cliffs, and ancient Norse for 'horned bay', as the shape of Bangor Bay resembles the horns of a bull. Another line of thought believes the name to be derived from the word beann which can mean ‘horn’, ‘point’ or ‘peak’ thought to indicate the sharp rocks around the shoreline. Alternatively this could also refer benn a ‘prong’ with the second element being cor meaning the ‘act of putting, placing; setting up’. This could have beannchar describing the area within the enclosure of a defensive barrier of prongs surrounding a monastic site. This could very well refer to the monastery of Bangor founded by St. Comgall marked by the present Church of Ireland’s ‘Abbey Church’ at the head of the town.


What is clear from the uncertainty is that Bangor has a long and illustrious history that is steeped in legend. Physical evidence of ancient occupation comes in the form of Bronze Age swords unearthed here in 1949. There are the remains of twenty-five raths, ancient Irish forts, around Bangor with the largest being at Rath-Gael that covers two acres and is surrounded by a double vallum.


But it is the Christian period where Bangor shone as a location for learning and scholarship. Indeed centuries before Belfast was ever heard of, Bangor was known all over Europe for the great College and the beautiful Abbey Church. St. Patrick, the patron Saint of Ireland, had a vision filled with angels whilst resting here and the location became named ‘The Vale of Angels’ thereafter. In AD 555 Saint Comgall, a soldier who laid down his sword, made that vision real by establishing Bangor Abbey on the site and in so doing provided the foundation for the town. He presided over the forestry for fifty years, and when he died his body was enshrined within its walls. Sometime after, the great School of Learning was established and in the process of time, it became one of the most eminent of Europe’s missionary institutions in the Early Middle Ages. Many persons of distinction and rank sent their young men to be educated in Bangor College and it sent out its Celtic missionaries to the British and European mainland. The missionaries of Bangor appear throughout medieval literature as a force for good fully realising St. Patrick’s vision of the ‘Vale of Angels’.


The Abbey and College prospered for many years until, as with all western European coasts, the abbey and town fell victim to the violent Viking incursions. In 822 Bangor was attacked and overcome by the Danes who ruthlessly massacred the Abbot and nine hundred monks. They desecrated the shrine of St. Comgall and left a trail of desolation behind them. The area remained under continual Viking attack for the following centuries and fell into decline. In 1125 the Abbey was rebuilt by St. Malachy. The new church was a magnificent forty-three metres long building, making it the largest church in Ireland at that time. It was called ‘Pulchro Choro, ‘the fair white Choir’, from the beautiful white stone and lime that was used for the first time in Ulster. It was rebuilt in the 13th century but the tower is 15th-century and a spire was later added in 1693. In 1542 as part of ‘The Dissolution of the Monasteries’, King Henry VIII disbanded the monastery and appropriated its assets and income. Bangor was about to become transformed by its near neighbour, England.

The Old Custom House with its adjoining tower house, facing Quay Street, and the harbour, was constructed in 1637 and marked this new anglicised and commercial direction for Bangor. This new direction was driven by James Hamilton, a Scot, who arrived in Bangor after been granted lands in North Down by King James I in 1605. Behind him came the new order introduced by the Scottish and English planters during the Plantation of Ulster. Within a century the town was designated a port and became an important source of customs revenue for the Crown. In the 1780s Colonel Robert Ward improved the harbour and promoted the cotton industries. The seafront area had several large steam-powered cotton mills employing hundreds of people. The construction of a large stone market house around this time, now used by the Northern Bank, is a testament to the increasing prosperity of the town.


By the middle of the 19th century the cotton mills were in decline but by then the railway had arrived from Belfast. This brought inexpensive travel from the city making it possible for working-class people to holiday on the sandy beaches of Bangor and nearby Ballyholme Bay. The town became a fashionable Victorian and Edwardian holiday resort where tourists could take in the sea air. Indeed the seafront was named ‘Queen's Parade’ after Queen Victoria who drove along the seafront during her visit to Ireland. It also became a highly desirable location to own property and the mills of the seafront were transformed into elegant housing.


Today Bangor is a large residential commuter town for Belfast and a retail centre. With a population in excess of 75,000, it is the third most populous settlement in Northern Ireland and the largest town in County Down. It is a wonderful seaside resort where the remnants of the town's varied past make for a very interesting visit. Despite the decline of the monastery, its influence can still be observed in the modern town with street names such as Abbots Close, Abbots Walk and many more. It is also marked by its three conspicuous church towers, the Abbey, the First Bangor Presbyterian Church and St Comgalls, and Bangor Parish Church, that greets approaching boaters from seaward long before his navigation aids. All speak of the town's illustrious ecclesiastical past. Bangor Abbey was closed in 1882 in favour of the new larger Church of Ireland in the south of the town. It was renovated in 1917 and traces of the old foundations are still visible today. Today, The Old Custom House alongside the marina hosts the tourist information centre providing an excellent first step into the town’s rich culture and history.



From a boating point of view, Bangor has it all and is a much-used yachting destination. It is close to the Irish Sea cruising routes and plays host to the extensive Bangor Marina, one of the largest and most well-run in Ireland. It offers a well-known safe berth for a passing boatman to attend to repairs, provisioning and to explore the highly attractive towns of Bangor and Belfast. It is also home to the very welcoming Royal Ulster and Ballyholme Yacht clubs.


What facilities are available?
Bangor Marina is Northern Ireland's biggest and most prestigious marina offering all facilities 24 hours a day 365 days a year. Visitor pontoons have electricity supply and water. The toilets, showers and a laundry room are situated on the ground floor of Bregenz House with Laundry tokens usage, and washing powder and an iron are available at the Marina office. You will also find a payphone in the amenities corridor in Bregenz House, and BT Openzone wireless broadband access is available for purchase throughout the marina area.

Fuel, Gasoil (red diesel) and unleaded petrol are available on the fuel pontoon 24 hours a day, where a pump out station is also located, please contact the marina office for service. Bottled gas can be obtained at the chandlery and there is a boatyard service on site catering for all repairs, complete with a 50 tons lift out capacity and a slipway for launching smaller boats. For provisions and everything else, the marina is situated at the bottom of the main street of Bangor, a prosperous and well appointed town.

Bangor is just 22 km (13.6 miles) east from the heart of Belfast City Centre on the A2. It has excellent transport connections via trains and bus services which connect to Belfast city and from there on to any location in Ireland. Flights to domestic and international destinations operate from Belfast City and Belfast International Airports. There are frequent ferry crossings from Belfast and Larne.


Any security concerns?
Secure access is provided by card or Personal Identification Number (PIN) to operate the Bregenz House door lock. Visitors are provided with a current PIN at the time of registering their visit.


With thanks to:
Charlie Kavanagh - ISA/RYA Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner. Photography with thanks to Albert Bridge, Aubrey Dale, Michael Parry, Ryan Kink, Matthew Johnston, Ross, Iker Merodio and Ross.


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.



















































A promotional video for Bangor marina



Photo montage of the marina and area.




A quick aerial 360° of Bangor Harbour area


About Bangor Harbour & Marina

Bangor, in Irish Beannchar derives its name from the Gaelic but the precise origin remains uncertain.

The ancient Gaelic text Táin Bó Fraích provides a legendary explanation for Trácht Bennchoir ‘Bangor strand’. Two warriors Fróech and Conall Cernach returned from France to the bay to land a herd of cattle belonging to Fróech. Conall's much loved servant, Bicne mac Láegaire, died on the boat and they called the bay, Bangor Bay today, Inber mBicne after his name. When they subsequently landed the cattle ashore they all shed their horns. Thus the area was given the name Trácht mBennchoir, Trácht, meaning strand, benn, horn, plus cor meaning casting; “the strand of the horn-casting”.

Others believe the name is derived from a combination Beanna, the Irish for cliffs, and ancient Norse for 'horned bay', as the shape of Bangor Bay resembles the horns of a bull. Another line of thought believes the name to be derived from the word beann which can mean ‘horn’, ‘point’ or ‘peak’ thought to indicate the sharp rocks around the shoreline. Alternatively this could also refer benn a ‘prong’ with the second element being cor meaning the ‘act of putting, placing; setting up’. This could have beannchar describing the area within the enclosure of a defensive barrier of prongs surrounding a monastic site. This could very well refer to the monastery of Bangor founded by St. Comgall marked by the present Church of Ireland’s ‘Abbey Church’ at the head of the town.


What is clear from the uncertainty is that Bangor has a long and illustrious history that is steeped in legend. Physical evidence of ancient occupation comes in the form of Bronze Age swords unearthed here in 1949. There are the remains of twenty-five raths, ancient Irish forts, around Bangor with the largest being at Rath-Gael that covers two acres and is surrounded by a double vallum.


But it is the Christian period where Bangor shone as a location for learning and scholarship. Indeed centuries before Belfast was ever heard of, Bangor was known all over Europe for the great College and the beautiful Abbey Church. St. Patrick, the patron Saint of Ireland, had a vision filled with angels whilst resting here and the location became named ‘The Vale of Angels’ thereafter. In AD 555 Saint Comgall, a soldier who laid down his sword, made that vision real by establishing Bangor Abbey on the site and in so doing provided the foundation for the town. He presided over the forestry for fifty years, and when he died his body was enshrined within its walls. Sometime after, the great School of Learning was established and in the process of time, it became one of the most eminent of Europe’s missionary institutions in the Early Middle Ages. Many persons of distinction and rank sent their young men to be educated in Bangor College and it sent out its Celtic missionaries to the British and European mainland. The missionaries of Bangor appear throughout medieval literature as a force for good fully realising St. Patrick’s vision of the ‘Vale of Angels’.


The Abbey and College prospered for many years until, as with all western European coasts, the abbey and town fell victim to the violent Viking incursions. In 822 Bangor was attacked and overcome by the Danes who ruthlessly massacred the Abbot and nine hundred monks. They desecrated the shrine of St. Comgall and left a trail of desolation behind them. The area remained under continual Viking attack for the following centuries and fell into decline. In 1125 the Abbey was rebuilt by St. Malachy. The new church was a magnificent forty-three metres long building, making it the largest church in Ireland at that time. It was called ‘Pulchro Choro, ‘the fair white Choir’, from the beautiful white stone and lime that was used for the first time in Ulster. It was rebuilt in the 13th century but the tower is 15th-century and a spire was later added in 1693. In 1542 as part of ‘The Dissolution of the Monasteries’, King Henry VIII disbanded the monastery and appropriated its assets and income. Bangor was about to become transformed by its near neighbour, England.

The Old Custom House with its adjoining tower house, facing Quay Street, and the harbour, was constructed in 1637 and marked this new anglicised and commercial direction for Bangor. This new direction was driven by James Hamilton, a Scot, who arrived in Bangor after been granted lands in North Down by King James I in 1605. Behind him came the new order introduced by the Scottish and English planters during the Plantation of Ulster. Within a century the town was designated a port and became an important source of customs revenue for the Crown. In the 1780s Colonel Robert Ward improved the harbour and promoted the cotton industries. The seafront area had several large steam-powered cotton mills employing hundreds of people. The construction of a large stone market house around this time, now used by the Northern Bank, is a testament to the increasing prosperity of the town.


By the middle of the 19th century the cotton mills were in decline but by then the railway had arrived from Belfast. This brought inexpensive travel from the city making it possible for working-class people to holiday on the sandy beaches of Bangor and nearby Ballyholme Bay. The town became a fashionable Victorian and Edwardian holiday resort where tourists could take in the sea air. Indeed the seafront was named ‘Queen's Parade’ after Queen Victoria who drove along the seafront during her visit to Ireland. It also became a highly desirable location to own property and the mills of the seafront were transformed into elegant housing.


Today Bangor is a large residential commuter town for Belfast and a retail centre. With a population in excess of 75,000, it is the third most populous settlement in Northern Ireland and the largest town in County Down. It is a wonderful seaside resort where the remnants of the town's varied past make for a very interesting visit. Despite the decline of the monastery, its influence can still be observed in the modern town with street names such as Abbots Close, Abbots Walk and many more. It is also marked by its three conspicuous church towers, the Abbey, the First Bangor Presbyterian Church and St Comgalls, and Bangor Parish Church, that greets approaching boaters from seaward long before his navigation aids. All speak of the town's illustrious ecclesiastical past. Bangor Abbey was closed in 1882 in favour of the new larger Church of Ireland in the south of the town. It was renovated in 1917 and traces of the old foundations are still visible today. Today, The Old Custom House alongside the marina hosts the tourist information centre providing an excellent first step into the town’s rich culture and history.



From a boating point of view, Bangor has it all and is a much-used yachting destination. It is close to the Irish Sea cruising routes and plays host to the extensive Bangor Marina, one of the largest and most well-run in Ireland. It offers a well-known safe berth for a passing boatman to attend to repairs, provisioning and to explore the highly attractive towns of Bangor and Belfast. It is also home to the very welcoming Royal Ulster and Ballyholme Yacht clubs.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Ballyholme Bay - 0.4 miles E
Groomsport - 1.2 miles ENE
Port Dandy - 2.8 miles E
Chapel Bay - 2.9 miles E
Donaghadee Harbour - 3.1 miles ESE
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Helen’s Bay - 1.3 miles WNW
Cultra - 3.2 miles W
Belfast Harbour - 5.7 miles WSW
Newtownabbey - 4.3 miles W
Greenisland - 3.9 miles WNW

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Bangor Harbour & Marina.








































A promotional video for Bangor marina



Photo montage of the marina and area.




A quick aerial 360° of Bangor Harbour area



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.