England Ireland Find Havens
England Ireland Find Routes
Boat
Maintenance
Comfort
Operations
Safety
Other








Slade Harbour is located on the southeast coast of Ireland a mile northeast of Hook Head Lighthouse. It is a small picturesque harbour featuring a highly distinctive castle. It offers a drying harbour or the anchor of anchoring off outside.

The harbour offers good protection but is prone to a surge in heavy weather easterly conditions. Outside on anchor, there is good shelter from northern and western winds. Navigation is straightforward as no obstructions hinder a seaward approach into Slade Harbour.
Please note

Boats planning to stay in Slade Harbour must be prepared to dry out and may need to check if space can be found as it can be congested. Slade Harbour, similar to all locations on the east side of the Hook Peninsula, should not be approached in any winds above Force 3 from the northeast, east, and southeast. Be watchful for lobster pot markers that are prolific in this sailing area.




Be the first
to comment
Keyfacts for Slade
Facilities
Water available via tapSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationDoctor or hospital in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 3 or more from NNE, NE, ENE, E, ESE, SE and SSE.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this location

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2.5 metres (8.2 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
May 29th 2019

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationDoctor or hospital in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 3 or more from NNE, NE, ENE, E, ESE, SE and SSE.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this location



Position and approaches
Expand to new tab or fullscreen

Haven position

52° 8.064' N, 006° 54.557' W

At the end of the pier at the entrance.

What is the initial fix?

The following Slade Harbour initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 8.212' N, 006° 54.219' W
This is 600 metres northeast of the harbour.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Slade for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Lumsdin's Bay - 0.9 miles N
  2. Templetown Bay - 1.6 miles N
  3. Dunmore East - 1.9 miles WNW
  4. Creadan Head - 2 miles NNW
  5. Dollar Bay - 2.2 miles N
  6. Baginbun Bay - 2.5 miles NE
  7. Fethard On Sea - 2.9 miles NE
  8. Duncannon - 3.3 miles N
  9. Bannow Bay - 3.5 miles NE
  10. Arthurstown - 4.1 miles NNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Lumsdin's Bay - 0.9 miles N
  2. Templetown Bay - 1.6 miles N
  3. Dunmore East - 1.9 miles WNW
  4. Creadan Head - 2 miles NNW
  5. Dollar Bay - 2.2 miles N
  6. Baginbun Bay - 2.5 miles NE
  7. Fethard On Sea - 2.9 miles NE
  8. Duncannon - 3.3 miles N
  9. Bannow Bay - 3.5 miles NE
  10. Arthurstown - 4.1 miles NNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search

Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

Expand to new tab or fullscreen



What's the story here?
Slade Castle and Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Slade in a picturesque fishing village located 1½ miles northeast of Hook Head on the east side of the Hook Peninsula and the west side of Bannow Bay. The small drying fishing quay is overlooked by a remarkably well-preserved castle that serves to make it highly conspicuous from seaward.

The small harbour is space constrained and dries entirely on springs but good depths are available for a short-term visit and vessels that can take to the hard can dry out inside. 4.7 metres can be expected at high water springs or 3.2 metres at neaps. Deep keeled vessels can make use of the tide to come alongside the outer harbour for a short stay. Alternatively, anchor in its small bay outside the harbour that provides good holding in sandy patches.


How to get in?
Slade as seen from the northeast
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location for seaward approaches. The prominent Hook Head lighthouse, upon Hook Point, provides a good seamark for the area.


Brecaun Bridge just breaking as seen from the north
Image: Michael Harpur


Vessels working from within the bay, between Baginbun Head and Slade, should be careful to avoid Brecaun Bridge. It is a reef that extends a ⅓ of a mile offshore, with a depth of 1.2 metres at its extremity. This lies approximately one mile northeast of the harbour along the coastline and it is advisable for vessels working their way down along the coast to come out from the headland to avoid this area of danger.
Please note

If the eastern stream is running, make short tacks along the mainland, where there is an eddy as far as the Hook Point.




Then entrance into Slade Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Initial fix location From the initial fix, proceed towards the harbour which will be conspicuous from some distance owing to its highly distinctive castle. When making a final approach on Slade, keep the row of lobster store-box moorings to starboard, then turn directly in towards the southern end of the moorings to approach the pier head.


The harbour area
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Vessels planning on entering Slade's outer harbour should target an arrival to be between half flood and half ebb tide. The inner harbour is more congested and only suitable for very small boats. It requires significant ’springing’ techniques to get in and out.


The entrance into the inner harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Those intending on anchoring should find a location 100 metres northeast of the harbour entrance in good holding ground. The area immediately outside the harbour tends to be of hard rock that offers unreliable anchoring. However, patches of sand that offer good holding can be found and the key is to find the sand patches in the translucent water and set the anchor into these. Land by the harbour wall or at the slipway.


Why visit here?
Slade or An Slaod in Irish, derives its name from the ancient Irish word Sladagh or Sladach meaning “Glen”. The word, in this sense, is now obsolete but in its time would narrowly apply to the village’s location being situated at the foot of a small valley through which the Hook peninsula’s singular stream enters the sea.


Slade as seen from the north
Image: Michael Harpur


The haven is uniquely striking as a result of its remarkable medieval castle from which its quays extend like arms to embrace a snug little harbour. Slade Castle began life in the 15th-century as a slender four-storey 56 feet high tower-house built by the Laffan family. They were of Anglo-Norman stock and received a grant of land as tenants to the Manor of Kilcloggan. The land estate was too small, about 86 hectares, to underpin such a substantial dwelling and they were thought to have derived their income from extensive maritime trade augmented by fishing enterprises. The castle’s location was thus chosen for its seaward properties; it is the only natural landing point on the outer Hook peninsula offering unhindered seaward access, protection from the prevalent south-westerlies and a sandy beach where boats could be brought ashore. The tower house was located on the south side of the inlet to make the best advantage of the harbour’s natural protection. Later 16th-century Laffans added the two storey battlemented hall and enclosure, or bawn, now called 'the Square'.


Slade Castle overlooking the harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


The family thrived here for almost two centuries until the castle was forfeited in the aftermath of the Irish Confederate Wars. When Oliver Cromwell decisively defeated the Irish Catholics and Royalists in the 1650s he redistributed the estates of the landowners that had turned rebel against his rule. This was despite the fact that the Laffan heir at the time was just a young boy who could not possibly have been implicated in the war.

A maritime castle from the outset Slade would have had a pier of some sort when it was first constructed. The first records of a modern quay, most likely the still surviving 'Ould Quay' built to the north of the inlet, dates back to 1684. This was constructed by Lord Henry Loftus who later sold the area to William Mansell who was related by marriage to Loftus. Mansell began significantly developing Slade extending the castle to accommodate an extensive salt works, improved the dwellings for the tenants and sheltered the harbour by growing trees. He did not live in the castle preferring to construct a large comfortable dwelling house for his family. The castle was later converted into a 'tenement' by dividing it into several 'apartments.'

The "New Quay" beneath the castle was built in 1847 as part of a Famine Relief Scheme that brought about most of the changes to the village we see now. It created the harbour, the approach road with its retaining wall along the cliff-top, leading past the back of the castle as opposed to its south facing front, that is encountered today. The internal walls in the harbour were constructed in the early twentieth century and the Office of Public Works took over the castle in the 1940s removing most of the 'tenement' alterations.

Slade Harbour has remained little touched by time
Image: Michael Harpur


The remarkable thing is how little Slade has changed since. Today the harbour is still dominated by the well-preserved tower house with its battlemented parquets. This makes it a uniquely pretty village with a distinct medieval feeling and an excellent place to stop.


Hook Lighthouse is easily visited from Slade
Image: Tourism Ireland


Slade is also close enough to Hook Lighthouse to make it a walk, and one that is well worth undertaking. It is the oldest lighthouse in Europe and the second oldest running lighthouse in the world. It was built under the grant from William Marshall in 1245. There is a café, craft shop and picnic area.

From a boating point of view, it is a particularly good anchorage in fresh west winds when the Tower Race off Hook Head may make passage off that headland more than a little uncomfortable. Likewise, vessels approaching the Waterford Estuary in a northwest wind, or if a tide wait is required, may find Slade a useful anchoring position. In good weather, it is a good start or finish destination for a scenic cruise around the legendary Hook Head peninsula.


What facilities are available?
There is little available at Slade Harbour save for the quay and slipway plus a public house. The nearby Hook Lighthouse visitor centre has an excellent café.


Any security concerns?
There has never been an issue know to have occurred in Slade Harbour.


With thanks to:
Declan Hearne, Long term fisherman and retired area Coastguard leader. Photography with thanks to Michael Harpur.


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.






























A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:

Please log in to leave a review of this haven.



Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.