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Between Jackdaw & Chapel Island

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Overview





Chapel and Jackdaw Islands are located on the northeast coast of Ireland within Strangford Lough. These are the first islands to be reached sailing west out of Strangford Lough’s Narrows. This anchorage is between the uninhabited islands.

This is a good anchorage offering all-round protection except for northerly quadrant winds and it offers particularly good protection against southerlies. The enclosed stretch of water provides shelter sailing in all weather, all tides and has ample marks to make daylight navigation straightforward.



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Keyfacts for Between Jackdaw & Chapel Island
Facilities
Marked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3 metres (9.84 feet).

Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary

A good location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Marked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration



Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 23.097' N, 005° 36.047' W

In between Jackdaw & Chapel Island.

What is the initial fix?

The following Chapel Island & Jackdaw Islands Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
54° 23.368' N, 005° 35.970' W
On the small 8.8 metre contour patch approximately 300 metres north of Chapel Island.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details for vessels approaching Strangford Lough from the north are available in the northeast Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Malin Head to Strangford Lough Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the south are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location. Details of the approaches, tidal timings and the run up the Narrows to about a ½ mile below Strangford are covered in the Entering and exiting the Strangford Narrows Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Between Jackdaw & Chapel Island for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Chapel Island - 0.2 miles ESE
  2. West of Jackdaw Island - 0.2 miles WSW
  3. Audley’s Point - 0.5 miles E
  4. Audley's Roads - 0.7 miles ESE
  5. Ballyhenry Bay - 0.8 miles E
  6. South of Salt Island - 1 miles WSW
  7. Don O’Neill Island - 1 miles NNW
  8. Killyleagh - 1.1 miles WNW
  9. Brandy Bay - 1.1 miles WSW
  10. Strangford Harbour (Strangford Village) - 1.1 miles ESE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Chapel Island - 0.2 miles ESE
  2. West of Jackdaw Island - 0.2 miles WSW
  3. Audley’s Point - 0.5 miles E
  4. Audley's Roads - 0.7 miles ESE
  5. Ballyhenry Bay - 0.8 miles E
  6. South of Salt Island - 1 miles WSW
  7. Don O’Neill Island - 1 miles NNW
  8. Killyleagh - 1.1 miles WNW
  9. Brandy Bay - 1.1 miles WSW
  10. Strangford Harbour (Strangford Village) - 1.1 miles ESE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Convergance Point Details of the approaches, tidal timings and the run up the Narrows to about a ½ below Strangford are covered in the Entering and exiting the Strangford Narrows Route location route description.

Having entered Strangford Lough make for the Chapel & Jackdaw Islands Initial Fix. This places you 300 metres north of Chapel Island where you can clearly see both islands and pass down equidistant between them.

Haven location Anchor according to draft and conditions in shale that provides excellent holding.


Why visit here?
This is a snug anchorage between two pleasant islands on which you can let the kids off to roam or indeed strike out oneself, but please note Jackdaw Island is an important nesting site for terns in the spring and so should be avoided at that time.

Chapel Island is owned by the National Trust and is one of the larger uninhabited islands in Strangford Lough. The island provides for excellent walks and the National Trust organises a low water guided walk across the mud flats from the shore to Chapel Island.

The drying window is long enough to get to the island and enjoy a good island walk before the tide returns. However such mudflat walks require an experienced guide as there are treacherous muddy patches under the sand, and without experience, you may stumble into one and get stuck. Should you find yourself knee-deep in immovable Strangford mud, the best advice is to fall down backwards and move your arms in a backstroke fashion – successful extrication may require the sacrifice of a pair of boots.

Landing on the island is recommended where walkers will find a bank that rises at the islands northern tip and runs like a spine up to a small plateau at the southern end. Perched on the highest part of the island, with commanding views in all directions, a visitor will find the scattered remains of a pre-Norman period chapel that most likely has given the island its name.

The chapel is best described as a hermitage that monks would go to for meditation and seclusion. Chapel Island is the ideal location for such a hermitage offering ample food via fish traps and shellfish, and a freshwater source that enabled self-sufficiency, along with island isolation. Two similar sites are to be found on Dunsy Island and near Audleystown. Today the hermitage is difficult to identify on Chapel Island. What remains is covered by grass and an impenetrable mound of briars surrounded by a scarcely discernable enclosure. What is impressive, however, is the view to the south over the Mournes from this elevated part of the island.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities on Chapel and Jackdaw Islands or in the surrounding area.


Any security concerns?
Never a problem known to have occurred around the isolated Chapel and Jackdaw Islands.


With thanks to:
Brian Crawford, local Strangford Lough boatman of many decades.


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The above plots are not precise and indicative only.









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