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Dingle Harbour

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Overview





Located in Co. Kerry on Ireland’s southwest coast, Dingle Harbour is set into the Dingle Peninsula on the northwest side of the extensive Dingle Bay. The well sheltered natural harbour has an inner harbour on its northern shore that hosts a fishing port, a marina, and a shallow draft anchoring area adjacent to the provincial market town.

Backed by lofty hills and enclosed in a landlocked expanse of water the inner harbour offers complete protection. Except for a couple of outlying rocks west of the entrance, which can easily be avoided day or night by keeping an entrance lighthouse open of the opposite point, the harbour has safe access. A well buoyed and transit marked channel, with a maintained depth of 2.6 metres LAT, leads through to the main pier.
Please note

Although the harbour has little tidal stream, spring rate tides at the entrance can reach 2.5 knots.




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Keyfacts for Dingle Harbour
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTourist Information office availableHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3 metres (9.84 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
May 15th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTourist Information office availableHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 8.183' N, 010° 16.589' W

This is the position of the west breakwater’s pierhead. Two fixed vertical 5 metre red lights will be seen here for a distance of two miles.

What is the initial fix?

The following Dingle Harbour Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
52° 6.210' N, 010° 15.520' W
This is one mile south of the entrance to Dingle Harbour. A course of due north from here will lead into the entrance situated inside of Reenbeg Point and Beenbane Point.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Dingle Harbour for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Ventry Harbour - 2.2 miles WSW
  2. Smerwick Harbour - 3 miles NW
  3. Great Blasket Island - 5.5 miles WSW
  4. Brandon Bay - 5.6 miles NNE
  5. Cahersiveen Marina - 7.1 miles S
  6. Castlegregory - 7.8 miles NE
  7. Knightstown - 7.8 miles S
  8. Scraggane Bay - 8.5 miles NE
  9. Illauntannig - 9.2 miles NE
  10. Portmagee - 9.5 miles SSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Ventry Harbour - 2.2 miles WSW
  2. Smerwick Harbour - 3 miles NW
  3. Great Blasket Island - 5.5 miles WSW
  4. Brandon Bay - 5.6 miles NNE
  5. Cahersiveen Marina - 7.1 miles S
  6. Castlegregory - 7.8 miles NE
  7. Knightstown - 7.8 miles S
  8. Scraggane Bay - 8.5 miles NE
  9. Illauntannig - 9.2 miles NE
  10. Portmagee - 9.5 miles SSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
Fishing Boats in Dingle Harbour
Photo: Michael Harpur


Situated on the north side of Dingle Bay, Dingle Harbour is a busy fishing port that is entered between Reenbeg Point and Beenbane Point. Set into to a completely landlocked inlet at high water, it presents a magnificent basin, completely landlocked, and surrounded by lofty hills, but with the falling tide a large portion of it uncovers, and what remains is very shallow except for a narrow channel to the harbour, with a marina, situated on the north shore. Dingle, situated on the north side of the harbour, is a market town only town on the Dingle Peninsula.


Initial fix location From the Initial Fix, located a mile south of the entrance, turn north and make for the entrance situated between Reenbeg Point and Beenbane Point.
Please note

Vessels approaching Dingle Harbour from the west should not try to cut this initial fix. It is essential to keep at least a mile from the north shore of Dingle Bay to the west side of the entrance to Dingle Harbour as foul ground runs out from the shore here.



The Eask Tower seen approaching Reenbeg Point
Image: Peter via Church CC BY 2.0


Crow Rock, that is covered on high water springs and dries to 3.7 metres, lies on the outer part of the foul ground. Colleen-oge Rock, with 1.8 metres of water over it, is situated about half way between it and the shore to the northeast. There is also a detached head, with 2.4 metres of water over it, residing 100 metres west-southwest of Crow Rock. As best seen on Admiralty 2790, the line of bearing 024° of the light on the northeast side of the harbour entrance, open southeast of Reenbeg Point, provides a clearing line for these dangers.

The entrance opening within Reenbeg Point and Beenbane Point
Image: Doug Snider


The entrance will be initially hard to define for those unfamiliar with the location. Two structures on the outer heads greatly assist in defining the entrance. The first is a white lighthouse within the entrance and on the northeast side.

White lighthouse – Fl G3s 20m 6M position: 52° 07.306' N, 010° 15.505' W

The latter is Eask Tower, with a fingerpost pointing east, located 0.85-mile west-southwest of the entrance upon the 188 metres high summit of Carhoo Hill.


Light tower at the entrance
Image: Doug Snider


Having passed between Reenbeg and Beenbane Points a berth of 100 metres clears any inshore dangers approaching the inner entrance channel. The narrow channel, situated immediately west of the white lighthouse, leads northwest for a distance of about half a mile.

Looking back out through the entrance to Dingle Harbour
Image: Colin Mutchler


In the inner end of the channel keep slightly to port of centre of the channel to avoid the rocky eastern foreshore. A drying reef, marked by Dingle Outer Light-buoy (starboard hand), extends 150 metres from Black Point, immediately opposite Flaherty Point. Black Point may be easily identified by the square old Lough Tower situated 400 metres northwest of the light.


Then inner harbour area
Image: Jim Linwood via CC BY-SA 2.0


Beyond Flaherty and Black Point the inner harbour opens up. At high water, it presents a magnificent landlocked basin surrounded by lofty hills. However with the falling tide, a large portion of it uncovers and what remains is very shallow except for the channel to the harbour and marina, situated on the north shore. Continue northeast of Flaherty Point and enter the dredged channel between the entrance light buoys (lateral) about 800 metres away.

The 40-metre wide channel is dredged to 2.6 metres LAT and is buoyed all the way to the two breakwaters of the inner harbour. From a position north of Flaherty Point, the entrance channel initially runs in a north-westerly direction for about 700 metres almost along the south coast of the harbour. Once the southern transit is aligned, it then turns north onto the transit or by night onto the leading lights and light buoys, for a distance of just over half a mile to Dingle Pier.

The southern transit, supporting the narrow north leg of the dredged channel, consists of two poles in the field on the south shore of the harbour – about ¾ of a mile from the light tower. They are situated 100 metres apart with black and white diamonds Oc. White 3s.

Once in-line come starboard and keep the alignment astern on 182°T to continue up the final leg of the dredged channel to the harbour. Ahead a sectored light on the west side of Main Pier will be seen all the way.

Sectored Light - Oc RWG 4s 13m 2M position: 52° 08.335' N, 010° 16.525' W


Dingle Harbour
Image: Jim Linwood via CC BY-SA 2.0


Haven location The harbour is divided into two basins by a central Dingle Pier. The east basin is used by fishing boats and has a depth of 5 metres. The west basin has a depth of 2.6 metres and has an 80 berth marina 20 of which are visitor berths. The basins are enclosed by two wide breakwaters. The east breakwater extends from the shore to the east of the fairway and about 1 mile south of the head of Dingle Pier. It has 2 fixed vertical green lights at its head. The west breakwater lies close west of the first and has 2 fixed vertical red lights at its head. When past the western breakwater pierhead turn to port into the marina.

The marina watches Channel 80 continuously so a night approach is welcome. Berth as directed by the marina master. Shallower draft vessels may anchor between 200 to 400 metres south-southwest of the pierhead in MLWN depths of 1.9 metres or less.


Why visit here?
Dingle, in Irish An Daingean is a busy fishing port located about 49 kms west of Tralee. This is a Gaeltacht region where the Irish language is spoken by almost everyone and is rich in music and dance.

Following the Norman invasion the town was developed as a port and by the 16th century was one of Ireland’s main trading ports exporting fish and hides and importing wines from Europe. The French and Spanish fishing fleets used the town as a base, and connections with Spain were particularly strong to such an extent that in the 16th century the parish church was rebuilt under Spanish patronage and dedicated to Saint James of Santiago de Compostela.

In 1583 following the ending of the Second Desmond Rebellion, which was against English rule in Ireland, Queen Elizabeth directed that a royal charter is granted to incorporate the town as a borough and to allow for the construction of town walls, and traces of these walls are still visible today.

The English language version of the town’s name was originally dropped in 2005 with the Irish language name An Daingean to be used in future. The change was particularly controversial as locals feared it would affect the local tourist industry and some locals took matters into their own hands and spray painted Dingle over the Irish version of the name on road signs etc.

Today Dingle has much to offer tourists and lots to attract sailors ashore; it has a number of pubs, restaurants and cafes creating many opportunities to hear traditional Irish music. A major attraction for visitors is the chance to see a bottlenose dolphin that has frequented the Dingle harbour area since 1984 and who has been given the name Fungi. He regularly shows up for tour boats that go out to meet him and visiting boatmen are most likely to have already met the friendly dolphin at the entrance. There is a bronze sculpture of Fungi in the town.

The scenery surrounding the naturally sheltered harbour is spectacular; mountains, sea cliffs, seabirds, sea life, and water-sport enthusiasts enjoying the safe protected waters, make getting out into the environment a must in Dingle area. There are also some very interesting locations in the immediate surrounding area from which Dingle Harbour makes an ideal base.

The Blasket Centre in Dun Chaoin, on the tip of the Dingle Peninsula, celebrates the story of the Blasket Islanders, the unique literary achievements of the island writers and their native language and tradition. Great Blasket was abandoned in 1953 as a result in the decline of its once vibrant population. Other places of interest include the Gallarus Oratory for history lovers, a religious site of ancient church ruins built over 1,000 years ago; or for energetic walkers take an organised walk up Mount Brandon, in Irish Cnoc Breanainn, which is Irelands second highest mountain at 925mtrs/2775ft. situated on the northern edge of the Dingle Peninsula, or for the more active family, there is Ireland’s largest indoor rock climbing wall and outdoor high ropes course. Dingle has got something for everybody.


What facilities are available?
Dingle has ample shops and amenities to cater for a population of about 2,000, including art and craft shops, restaurants, pubs, supermarket, laundrette, internet cafe, post office, bank, and tourist information centre. The marina is in the centre of the town so all facilities are available in the immediate vicinity.

The marina offers water, gas, alongside diesel (that can also be supplied by cans along with petrol to the Marina), trolleys for loading, electricity, showers, and toilets, all of which are available to the visitor berths. Harbour fees are applicable. Electronic repairs, marine engineering repairs, chandlery, a slipway and sailmaker are available in the area. A bus service operates to Tralee and from there to all major national towns.


Any security concerns?
Never a problem known to have occurred to a vessel in Dingle Harbour.


With thanks to:
Gareth Thomas, Yacht Jalfrezi.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.



























Aerial footage of the harbour area and entrance




An overview of Dingle.



West Kerry overview




Dingle at it's best.



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