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Galway Docks

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Overview





Galway Docks is located on the west coast of Ireland, northeast by east of the Aran Islands which enclose Galway Bay, and is situated at the head of the bay. It is a commercial harbour set in the heart of Ireland’s third largest city. It provides pontoon berths for leisure craft within a tidal basin plus tide-wait locations outside.

Galway Docks is located on the west coast of Ireland, northeast by east of the Aran Islands which enclose Galway Bay, and is situated at the head of the bay. It is a commercial harbour set in the heart of Ireland’s third largest city. It provides pontoon berths for leisure craft within a tidal basin plus tide-wait locations outside.

Enclosed within the confines of a gated wet-dock, Galway Dock offers complete protection from all conditions. Access is straightforward as the approaches through Galway Bay are largely protected from the full force of the Atlantic swell by the Aran Islands and the channel to the wet dock is well marked for day and night access.
Please note

Demand for a berth is high and it is advisable to make contact with the Harbour Office in advance to determine if a berth is available. Vessels can only enter and exit in the two hours that precede local HW. At all other times the gates are closed.




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Keyfacts for Galway Docks



Last modified
July 19th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansExtensive shopping available in the areaFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 16.140' N, 009° 2.872' W

This is the location of the entrance gates to the wet dock.

What is the initial fix?

The following Galway Harbour initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 10.966' N, 009° 22.452' W
This is midway between the Black Rock Buoy, Fl.R.3s, and that of the Margaretta Marker Buoy, Fl.G.3s. It is the three miles out from Leverets light tower and in its leading white sector. A course of 062°(T) towards the tower will lead into the Galway Roadstead and set up a final approach to Galway Docks.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in western Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Loop Head to Slyne Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Galway Docks for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 3 miles SE
  2. Kinvara Bay - 4.1 miles SSE
  3. Aughinish Bay - 4.2 miles S
  4. Spiddle - 5.8 miles W
  5. Ballyvaughan Bay - 5.9 miles SSW
  6. Fanore Bay - 7.9 miles SW
  7. Rossaveal - 11.4 miles W
  8. Sruthan Quay - 11.9 miles W
  9. Doolin Pier (Ballaghaline Quay) - 12.4 miles SW
  10. Inisheer - 13 miles SW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 3 miles SE
  2. Kinvara Bay - 4.1 miles SSE
  3. Aughinish Bay - 4.2 miles S
  4. Spiddle - 5.8 miles W
  5. Ballyvaughan Bay - 5.9 miles SSW
  6. Fanore Bay - 7.9 miles SW
  7. Rossaveal - 11.4 miles W
  8. Sruthan Quay - 11.9 miles W
  9. Doolin Pier (Ballaghaline Quay) - 12.4 miles SW
  10. Inisheer - 13 miles SW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?
Ship entering Galway Docks
Image: Autonomous Aerials Ireland


The City of Galway lies on the River Corrib between Lough Corrib and Galway Bay. The city stands on both banks of the river and is connected by several bridges. The principal part of the city is on the docks side, lying between the River and Lough Atalia on the east side of the city. It is the fourth most populous urban area in the Republic of Ireland and the sixth most populous city in the island of Ireland. Galway Docks lie on the east side of the river and it has a commercial port with a small fishing and marina within the docks.

It is entered from North Bay, between Mutton Island and Hare Island. Galway Docks are situated within the mouth of the river Corrib that is entered between Nimmo's Pier, on the west, and Rinmore Point 250 metres to the northeast.

The berth is within a wet dock that retains its depths, 8.5 metres MHWS and 7.0 metres MHWN, by impounding the previous HW. Entry into the harbour is thereby restricted to 2 hours before HW and the gates close at HW. This may be extended by the Harbour Master depending on draught of other vessels within the docks or the prevailing weather conditions, height of tide etc.

Galway Docks as seen from Nimmo's Pier with the gates closed
Image: Ian Capper via CC BY-SA 2.0


The vessel’s ETA should be forwarded to the harbour master 24 hours prior to arrival. VHF channel 12 call sign [Galway Harbour Radio] or +353 91 561874. Galway Port Radio sets watch during office hours and at 2 hours before HW. If the final approach is not at the right time it is best to anchor in 2 to 4 metres to the lee of Mutton Island to wait for the dock gates to open. Leisure craft are obliged to give way to commercial shipping when operating within the confines of the dock or its approaches.

Ship approaching the dock entrance
Image: Autonomous Aerials Ireland


The normal anchorage for leisure vessels awaiting the tide to enter Galway Docks is in Galway Roadstead to the east of Mutton Island northwest of the Mutton Island port marker buoy, by night Fl(2).R.6s. 5 metres of water will be found here but there are a number of moorings in this location. Heavy gales from west or southwest raise an uneasy sea in the outer parts of the anchorage, but the holding ground is excellent. In westerly gales, a vessel will find a more protected anchorage to the east of Black Head.


Convergance Point Approach details are available in western Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Loop Head to Slyne Head Route location. Once through the Aran Islands and into Galway Bay, the 28 miles in an east-northeast direction, to Galway Docks is largely protected from the full force of the Atlantic swell by the islands chain. The main channel in from the west lies between Black Rock on the north and Margaretta Shoal on the south, both marked by light buoys. The Galway Harbour initial fix is set in the middle of these.

Southern approaching vessels will find from a position of about a mile and a half northwest of Black Head, a course of about 056° T for a distance of 7.2 miles leads to the initial fix between the lighted buoys moored off the west end of Margaretta Shoal and the Black Rock. Likewise, a northern approaching vessel will find from a position of about three miles northwest of Rock Island a course of 085° T for a distance of 28 miles leads to the initial fix. Both tracks carry well in excess of 10 metres of water all the way.

Initial fix location From the initial fix it is simply a matter of passing between the light buoys, and following the sets of leading lights and markers into the docks. After reaching the initial fix track in on The Leverets round tower, a narrow black tower with white bands, 500 metres to the southwest of Hare Island - colloquially known as the candle stick. By night it shows a light Q WRG 9m, 10M (white sectors 058° to 065° leading in from seaward).

The dangers in the approach Galway Harbour all commence about two miles below Mutton Island. Bordering the north side of the channel they consist of the Black Rock, the Foudra Rock, and Mutton Island Rocks.

On the south side the dangers are less of a concern to leisure craft as they are largely the deep Margaretta and Tawin shoals, along with the Kilcolgan and Henry ledges. The channel between these dangers leading to Galway harbour is half a mile wide, with from 13 to 20 metres of water.

Approaches to Galways Docks
Image: AerialStockIreland.com


Mutton Island is a low rocky islet, based on an extensive field of rocks that uncover to a considerable extent. It lies at the outer end of a rocky flat extending from the north shore. The island and the flat form the west side of Galway’s outer harbour and providing shelter to Galway Harbour against westerly winds. Except for a small swampy portion on the eastern side, the island has been entirely taken over by a sewerage works. A conspicuous now disused low 10 meters high light tower, white with a red railing at its head, stands near the centre of the island.

Mutton Island is foul out to almost ½ a mile on its west side and 400 metres on its south side. The southern rocks are easily passed by staying south of the light buoy marking the outfall diffusers moored to the south of Mutton Island.

Mutton O/F - Buoy Fl.Y.5s position: 53° 14.960’N, 009° 03.310’W

The Mutton Island port buoy, by night Fl(2).R.6s, is moored east-southeast of the island located on a bearing of 136°T and 500 metres from Mutton Island Tower.

Mutton Island - port buoy F(2)R 6s position: 53° 15.062’N, 009° 02.923’W

A ⅓ of a mile north by northeast of the Mutton Island port marker buoy is the Mid Channel port marker buoy, by night Fl.R.4s. Proceeding on from the Mutton Island port marker buoy, a ¼ mile out from The Leverets Tower turn towards a line of bearing of 013° T of Rinmore Light, a square white tower 7 metres high and half a mile east of Galway Pier on the Rinmore shore. This intercepts the lead in from the Leveret Tower’s and by night a light is shown Iso WRG 4s, 7m, 5M with the white sector 008° to 018°. It leads for a short distance to the seaward end of the dredged entrance channel to Galway Docks.
Please note

The red obstruction lights on the shore may be confused with Rinmore Light. Red lights on a radio mast at Rinmore Barracks and on a radio mast situated just under a mile to the north, when in-line, incorrectly appear to be leading lights in transit to marking the eastern limit Rinmore Light’s white sector.



Once past the Mid Channel port marker buoy, by night Fl.R.4s, situated a third of a mile north by northeast of the Mutton Island port marker buoy, the final approach channel is set up for Galway Docks.

The dredged channel, leading from the entrance of the outer harbour between Mutton Island and Hare Island, up to the inner harbour is about 80 metres wide, 1200 metres to the mouth of the harbour and has a maintained depth of 3.6 metres. The bearing of 325°T, off a red diamond, yellow diagonal stripes on a mast at the inner end of New Pier, leads through the dredged channel. By night this is defined by a Directional light on New Pier Alt GWR 7m 3M.

The mouth of the harbour is situated between Nimmo's Pier, by night Fl.Y.2s7m7M, on the west and Rinmore Point 250 metres to the northeast, by night Fl.G.5.2m2M.
Please note

On a falling tide, principally at springs, or after sustained rainfall, a strong easterly set may be experienced across the mouth of the dock. There can also be a strong east set out of the River Corrib across the mouth of the harbour. As such vessels who desire to sail in should have an auxiliary motor at the ready.



Immediately to port within the outer entrance, and close within the entrance to the River Corrib, there are a number of small drying quays. The Claddagh canal basin has had a set of dock gates installed and the basin has been dredged. Entry and departure is restricted to a short period before high water and depths of 2 metres are reportedly available within the basin. However, it would be best advised to take advice before selecting this location. The entrance to Eglinton Canal is situated north of Claddagh, but it is now disused.

It is also possible to temporarily come alongside a pier for a short wait just within the mouth at the eastern side of the entrance. This is alongside the east side of the 85 metres long New Pier. The New Pier extends from the dock’s eastern gate and provides a dredged cut with 3.4 metres LWS on the east side that is colloquially known as the Layby. It has very limited room to round up and cannot be relied upon as it is often crowded by fishing vessels. With winds from the south or southeast it should be avoided. This is particularly the case in strong gales from these points when the seas sweep round and over this pierhead making it dangerous.

Galway Dock aerial
Image: Autonomous Aerials Ireland


Haven location Galway Dock is accessed by a single sea lock and is T shaped with a separate southwest basin for small craft. The width of the dock gates is 19.8 metres and inside its turning area is 146 metres wide enabling it to host large commercial ships.

Marina section in Galway Dock
Image: Autonomous Aerials Ireland


When the dock gates open enter the dock and continue to the top of the T and then turn to port. A basin within the southwest corner of the dock is reserved for small craft where The Galway Harbour Company operates a pontoon with 31 berths extending perpendicularly from the quay walls. An additional 8 berths are available on a 60-metre pontoon/walkway. Berth in accordance with Harbour Master's directions.

The 60-metre walkway pontoon
Image: William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0



Why visit here?
Situated at the mouth of the River Corrib, at the eastern end of Galway Bay, Galway takes its name from the river’s original Irish name Gaillimh that translates to ‘stoney’, as in ‘stoney river’. It is the third largest city in the Republic Of Ireland, after Dublin and Cork, and is the most central port on the west coast of Ireland.

Boats alongside Claddagh Quay Galway
Image: Tourism Ireland


As with most seaports Galway's wealth was built on fishing and extensive sea trade. First authentic accounts of Galway date back to the 12th-century when, with the consent of Henry II of England, the Anglo-Norman invaders of the powerful de-Burgh family subjugated the natives and claimed the land. Following the de-Burgh's claim, several families of Norman descent came to the area and in a short space of time fourteen of these family-based tribes became prominent wealthy merchants. Over time these families accumulated such wealth and fame that they were able to assert complete control of the city's affairs and retained this standing for the following 200 years. Galway is still known to this day as “The City of the Tribes”. The flourishing trade that the town developed with France, Spain and the West Indies brought about a University College, founded as Queen's College, in 1849. This gained Galway the reputation of being the intellectual capital of Ireland and it still remains an important centre for the study of the Gaelic language and its literature.


Galways is a major centre for traditional Irish music
Image: Tourism Ireland


Today the City of Galway stands on both banks of the River with the two parts connected by several bridges. The principal part of the city is on the docks side, lying between the River and Lough Atalia on the east side of the city. Much of this has been built on land reclaimed from the sea. The last major reclamation took place in the 19th century and a further reclamation is planned for the 21st century that will provide for a new dock and marina.


Galway Cathedral
Image: Emilio García


The city of Galway is renowned as Ireland’s Cultural Heart and cherished by all who visit it. It is home to some well-regarded art galleries, hosts several festivals of theatre, music and dance, and is a major centre for traditional Irish music. As a point of dubious interest in 2007 Galway was named as one of the eight “sexiest cities in the world”. As befitting a large city Galway has something to cater for most tastes having many pubs and bars, cafes and restaurants, cinema complexes, theatres, museums and galleries, together with extensive shopping centres. It also offers a variety of sporting activities including the famous Galway Races that are the highlight of the Irish horse racing calendar. The festival runs for seven consecutive days starting from the last Monday in July each year, and for those who can stand the pace, it is well worth a visit.


The quaint and bustling pedestrianized Quay Street in the heart of Galway city
Image: Tourism Ireland


There are plenty of things here to entice a visiting boater ashore to sample some of the “Irishness” of this great City. Indeed far too many to mention here and a visit to the tourist office is essential. A good start, however, would be a walk to Eyre Square that is a short distance from the docks. This is at the centre of the city, and it leads very naturally to Galway Cathedral and then to the Spanish Arch where Galway's river meets the sea. Here are the remains of a 16th-century bastion that was added to the town's mediaeval walls to protect merchant ships from looting. In the heart of the historical town centre is ‘Kirwan's Lane’ that is home to a host of cafes, restaurants and craft shops where a leisurely hour may be spent. After this a stroll to the Salmon Weir Bridge where Atlantic salmon can be seen making their way upstream of the River Corrib to spawn. But this is only a start and the advice of the tourist office is essential to get the most out of this very special city.

Galway has it all for the visiting sailor and it is the ideal location on the remote western coast to attend to essential provisioning, shopping or reconnecting with the urban experience that will very rare along the west coast. Moreover, it is also well served by bus and rail transport and the airport is located 6km to the east of the city making it a handy drop off or collection point for sailors.

Galway Docks Marina is a perfectly secure location to endure some bad weather
Image: Tourism Ireland


Galway Dock should also be considered as a useful bolthole. The west coast of Ireland has a mild, moist, temperate climate, and the city experiences a lack of temperature extremes with temperatures below 0°C and above 30°C being rare. Though these extreme temperatures are rare the area can experience severe windstorms as a result of Atlantic depressions, and although they mostly occur between late autumn and early spring you can be unlucky and catch one at other times, so it is advisable to keep a weather eye on the advance forecast. In such circumstances, a safe berth in a bolthole such as Galway on this coast would be recommended.

Galway Hooker
Image: CC0


In passing it should be noted that many trading vessels docked in Galway through these centuries, yet it is a local boat that has become a signature for the town; the Galway Hooker. The Hooker, or in Irish bád mór or húicéir is the traditional fishing vessel of Galway Bay and was developed for the western coasts strong seas. It is easily identified by a distinctive sail formation consisting of a single mast with mainsail and a bowsprit with two foresails. Traditionally, the boat is black, being coated in pitch, and the sails are a dark red-brown. The Hookers were fishing in their largest numbers in Galway Bay before the Great Famine when the Claddagh fleet alone numbered at least 100 vessels. Unfortunately, famine, depleted fishing stocks, and the advent of modern technology eventually sealed the Hooker's fate as a working vessel. Recently there has been a major revival of the Galway hooker with boats being painstakingly constructed, and anyone sailing in these waters should keep an eye out for this beautiful traditional craft.


What facilities are available?
With a population of approximately 65,000 Galway is Ireland’s third largest city and the principal service centre for the western region. All provisions are available in abundance and most likely within a short walk from the docks including a host of banks and a Post Office. Freshwater and electrical power is available at the pontoons. Power cards can be obtained from the Harbour Office plus from Docs Newsagents (located on New Dock Street). Fuel is available by arrangement with a road tanker or via jerry cans. Boat and electronic repairs are available locally but there is no slipway.

Likewise, transport communications are excellent to the major population centres of Ireland. Iarnród Éireann, Ireland's national rail operator, currently runs six return passenger services each day between Galway and Dublin ‘Heuston’ that also serve intermediate stations. Travel time is just under 3 hours. There is also a Galway–Limerick line, with around 5–6 trains each way per day. Galway Coach Station, located at Fairgreen, offers scheduled direct and commuter services between the Coach Station, Dublin and Dublin Airport, as well as services to Limerick, Cork and Clifden. International travel is catered for by Galway Airport, located at Carnmore, 6km to the east of the city. Other international airports at Shannon (88 km) and Dublin (225 km) are made available by bus and train connections.


Any security concerns?
The port is in the centre of a town quay, but is secured behind a gate.


With thanks to:
Gareth Thomas, Yacht Jalfrezi


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




Galway Docks Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Galway Docks Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Galway Docks Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Galway Docks
Image: eOceanic thanks Tourism Ireland




Aerial time-lapse of Galway Fisher entering Port of Galway




Marina in Galway Dock's southwest basin




Galway City aerial overview


About Galway Docks

Situated at the mouth of the River Corrib, at the eastern end of Galway Bay, Galway takes its name from the river’s original Irish name Gaillimh that translates to ‘stoney’, as in ‘stoney river’. It is the third largest city in the Republic Of Ireland, after Dublin and Cork, and is the most central port on the west coast of Ireland.

Boats alongside Claddagh Quay Galway
Image: Tourism Ireland


As with most seaports Galway's wealth was built on fishing and extensive sea trade. First authentic accounts of Galway date back to the 12th-century when, with the consent of Henry II of England, the Anglo-Norman invaders of the powerful de-Burgh family subjugated the natives and claimed the land. Following the de-Burgh's claim, several families of Norman descent came to the area and in a short space of time fourteen of these family-based tribes became prominent wealthy merchants. Over time these families accumulated such wealth and fame that they were able to assert complete control of the city's affairs and retained this standing for the following 200 years. Galway is still known to this day as “The City of the Tribes”. The flourishing trade that the town developed with France, Spain and the West Indies brought about a University College, founded as Queen's College, in 1849. This gained Galway the reputation of being the intellectual capital of Ireland and it still remains an important centre for the study of the Gaelic language and its literature.


Galways is a major centre for traditional Irish music
Image: Tourism Ireland


Today the City of Galway stands on both banks of the River with the two parts connected by several bridges. The principal part of the city is on the docks side, lying between the River and Lough Atalia on the east side of the city. Much of this has been built on land reclaimed from the sea. The last major reclamation took place in the 19th century and a further reclamation is planned for the 21st century that will provide for a new dock and marina.


Galway Cathedral
Image: Emilio García


The city of Galway is renowned as Ireland’s Cultural Heart and cherished by all who visit it. It is home to some well-regarded art galleries, hosts several festivals of theatre, music and dance, and is a major centre for traditional Irish music. As a point of dubious interest in 2007 Galway was named as one of the eight “sexiest cities in the world”. As befitting a large city Galway has something to cater for most tastes having many pubs and bars, cafes and restaurants, cinema complexes, theatres, museums and galleries, together with extensive shopping centres. It also offers a variety of sporting activities including the famous Galway Races that are the highlight of the Irish horse racing calendar. The festival runs for seven consecutive days starting from the last Monday in July each year, and for those who can stand the pace, it is well worth a visit.


The quaint and bustling pedestrianized Quay Street in the heart of Galway city
Image: Tourism Ireland


There are plenty of things here to entice a visiting boater ashore to sample some of the “Irishness” of this great City. Indeed far too many to mention here and a visit to the tourist office is essential. A good start, however, would be a walk to Eyre Square that is a short distance from the docks. This is at the centre of the city, and it leads very naturally to Galway Cathedral and then to the Spanish Arch where Galway's river meets the sea. Here are the remains of a 16th-century bastion that was added to the town's mediaeval walls to protect merchant ships from looting. In the heart of the historical town centre is ‘Kirwan's Lane’ that is home to a host of cafes, restaurants and craft shops where a leisurely hour may be spent. After this a stroll to the Salmon Weir Bridge where Atlantic salmon can be seen making their way upstream of the River Corrib to spawn. But this is only a start and the advice of the tourist office is essential to get the most out of this very special city.

Galway has it all for the visiting sailor and it is the ideal location on the remote western coast to attend to essential provisioning, shopping or reconnecting with the urban experience that will very rare along the west coast. Moreover, it is also well served by bus and rail transport and the airport is located 6km to the east of the city making it a handy drop off or collection point for sailors.

Galway Docks Marina is a perfectly secure location to endure some bad weather
Image: Tourism Ireland


Galway Dock should also be considered as a useful bolthole. The west coast of Ireland has a mild, moist, temperate climate, and the city experiences a lack of temperature extremes with temperatures below 0°C and above 30°C being rare. Though these extreme temperatures are rare the area can experience severe windstorms as a result of Atlantic depressions, and although they mostly occur between late autumn and early spring you can be unlucky and catch one at other times, so it is advisable to keep a weather eye on the advance forecast. In such circumstances, a safe berth in a bolthole such as Galway on this coast would be recommended.

Galway Hooker
Image: CC0


In passing it should be noted that many trading vessels docked in Galway through these centuries, yet it is a local boat that has become a signature for the town; the Galway Hooker. The Hooker, or in Irish bád mór or húicéir is the traditional fishing vessel of Galway Bay and was developed for the western coasts strong seas. It is easily identified by a distinctive sail formation consisting of a single mast with mainsail and a bowsprit with two foresails. Traditionally, the boat is black, being coated in pitch, and the sails are a dark red-brown. The Hookers were fishing in their largest numbers in Galway Bay before the Great Famine when the Claddagh fleet alone numbered at least 100 vessels. Unfortunately, famine, depleted fishing stocks, and the advent of modern technology eventually sealed the Hooker's fate as a working vessel. Recently there has been a major revival of the Galway hooker with boats being painstakingly constructed, and anyone sailing in these waters should keep an eye out for this beautiful traditional craft.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Spiddle - 5.8 miles W
Rossaveal - 11.4 miles W
Sruthan Quay - 11.9 miles W
Greatman's Bay - 13.5 miles W
Kiggaul Bay - 14.9 miles W
Coastal anti-clockwise:
South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 3 miles SE
Kinvara Bay - 4.1 miles SSE
Aughinish Bay - 4.2 miles S
Kilronan - 14.9 miles WSW
Inishmaan - 13.4 miles WSW

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Galway Docks.
































Aerial time-lapse of Galway Fisher entering Port of Galway




Marina in Galway Dock's southwest basin




Galway City aerial overview



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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.