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Mullaghmore

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Overview






Please note

eOceanic has been made aware of this haven. We are looking for a sailor with first-hand experience to provide their direct personal insights so that we may complete our write up. In advance of this we have posted these preliminary research notes. Do you know this location? Please contact us or click the 'Report a Mistake or Omission' button below to help share this location with the sailing community.


Mullaghmore Head, 198 feet high with a ruined telegraph tower on its north side, has several rocks off its north-east extremity lying at a distance of 370 metres from the cliffs, some of which are covered only at high spring tides. Outside these, foul ground extends a quarter of a mile further, and is steep-to. Therefore care must be observed when rounding the head to give it a wide berth, and not to approach it nearer than half a mile in the finest weather.

The anchorage and pier are on the south-east side of the head. The latter almost dries at low water and with westerly gales the sea breaks all over the shallow anchorage. It is nevertheless the only anchorage between Sligo and Donegal harbours, and during the summer months may be considered generally safe.



1 comment
Keyfacts for Mullaghmore
Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncovered


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementSailing Club baseScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: may only reasonably accommodate vessels less than a specific length

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
1 metres (3.28 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
May 30th 2017

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncovered


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementSailing Club baseScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierRestriction: may only reasonably accommodate vessels less than a specific length



Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 27.947' N, 008° 26.828' W

this position is at the pierhead at Mullaghmore

What is the initial fix?

The following Mullaghmore initial fix will set up a final approach:
54° 31.206' N, 008° 27.571' W
in Donegal Bay midway between St. John's Point lighthouse to the north and Mullaghmore Head to the south



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Mullaghmore for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Inishmurray - 4.8 miles WSW
  2. Killybegs - 6.3 miles N
  3. Rosses Point - 6.6 miles SSW
  4. Brown Bay - 6.9 miles SW
  5. Sligo - 7.1 miles S
  6. Teelin - 7.1 miles NW
  7. Donegal Town Harbour - 8 miles NE
  8. Ballysadare Bay - 8.6 miles SSW
  9. Aughris Hole - 9.8 miles SW
  10. White Strand Bay - 10.2 miles NW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Inishmurray - 4.8 miles WSW
  2. Killybegs - 6.3 miles N
  3. Rosses Point - 6.6 miles SSW
  4. Brown Bay - 6.9 miles SW
  5. Sligo - 7.1 miles S
  6. Teelin - 7.1 miles NW
  7. Donegal Town Harbour - 8 miles NE
  8. Ballysadare Bay - 8.6 miles SSW
  9. Aughris Hole - 9.8 miles SW
  10. White Strand Bay - 10.2 miles NW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
Route location The 'Erris Head to Malin Head' coastal description provides approach information to the suggested initial fix. Vessels approaching from the south should select the northeast bound Route location sequenced description; vessels approaching from the north should select the southwest bound Route location sequence; western approaches may use either description.

Mullaghmore is situated on the northwest coast of Ireland in County Sligo sixteen miles north of Sligo town. It lies on the southern shore of Donegal Bay, Ireland's largest bay which is open to the west to the Atlantic Ocean. A small seaside fishing village, Mullaghmore is located on a peninsula to the east of the rocky cliffs of Mullaghmore Head and features a beach and a picturesque stone built harbour.

Mullaghmore is a good anchorage for yachts up to 10 metres long and when moored within the harbour offers good shelter protection and is generally safe in any weather. Berthing alongside either the north or south piers is convenient, the south usually being the more sheltered. The harbour nearly dries so although the access is straightforward it is best at HW when the depth is 2 metres, and care should be taken when entering or leaving to keep near to the north pier as there are drying rocks adjacent to the south pier at the entrance to the harbour. It is also worth noting that it was reported in June 2012 at a Sligo County Council meeting that a sandbank has built up over the years at the entrance to the harbour and is now causing problems for some boat owners.


Why visit here?
Mullaghmore, Irish : An Mullach Mor meaning “the great summint” is one of County Sligo's noted holiday destinations, on its western side lie the rocky cliffs of Mullaghmore Head that defy the Atlantic gales, whilst to the east lies a golden sandy beach and the scenic harbour which is well sheltered from the Atlantic Ocean.

A popular holiday centre characterised by ocean views and a skyline dominated by the monolithic shape of Ben Bulben mountain, Mullaghmore's facilities include a superb blue flag beach that stretches for about 2 miles that is safe for swimming and other watersports particularly surfing and windsurfing. Mullaghmore is one of the best big wave surfing locations in the world caused by a combination of a direct west facing location and the funnel shape of Donegal Bay. The westerlies of the Atlantic Ocean get funnelled into a relatively small area which increases the size of the swell. In March 2012 surfers and windsurfers from all over the world travelled to Mullaghmore to ride waves of up to 50 feet high off Mullaghmore head. The harbour also has a renowned reputation for being a base for licensed sea fishing and angling with local boats being hired by tourists during the summer season.

A favourite destination for the charter boats leaving Mullaghmore harbour is Inishmurray Island situated in the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest of Mullaghmore Head. The island which is 1 mile long and 0.5 mile wide ceased to be inhabited in 1950 but is interesting for its antiquities enclosed by a great wall. There was originally a pagan stone fort here converted into a monastery by St. Molaise in the early 6C and the island is well worth a visit weather permitting to see the remarkably well preserved 6C monastic buildings. There are natural quays and mooring rings where the local charter boats go alongside, and these also provide for good dinghy landings.

The first owner to set foot on the conquered lands of north Sligo was Henry John Temple the 3rd Viscount Palmerston who arrived in 1808. He is best known as Lord Palmerston who served two terms as Prime Minister of England. It was he who commissioned the building of Classiebawn Castle on a hill overlooking Mullaghmore, a fairytale styled building with magnificent views of the surrounding villages, seas, lakes and mountains. Palmerston died in 1865 leaving completion of Classiebawn to his successor the First Lord Mount Temple, and on completion of the building in 1874 succession then passed to the Ashleys. Palmerston's greatest achievement and contribution to the area was the development of the beautiful stone harbour in Mullaghmore which still remains intact. After commencing in 1822 it was completed in 1841 and Palmerston had big plans for it as an exporting harbour but these plans never came to fruition, and although now used mostly for pleasure craft it served the fishing community very well in past times.

In 1922 Edwina Ashley, daughter of Col. Wilfrid Ashley, married Lord Louis Mountbatten great grandson of Queen Victoria. In August 1979 this first Earl Mountbatten of Burma, last Viceroy of India and supreme Allied Commander in SE Asia during world war two, was assassinated when his boat was blown up off the coast of Mullaghmore by the IRA. The castle and its surrounding lands are now owned by a retired businessman, and he is the first Irish owner of Classiebawn Castle and the estate since the lands were confiscated from the O'Conor Sligo in the 17th century.

For the visiting yachtsman Mullaghmore is a safe harbour to drop into and it is recognised as the best anchorage during passage between Sligo and Donegal bays. Facilities in the village are limited but there is a shop for provisions, fresh water available, and diesel by can is obtained from the local boatyard/shipright. For those in need of liquid refreshment and a good meal, the village has pubs and restaurants together with a smart hotel.


With thanks to:
inyourfootsteps site research


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.














The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with Mullaghmore.


The following video presents fabulous aerial footage of Mullaghmore and the surrounding area.




The following video presents a view from a fishing boat as it leaves the harbour.




The following video presents various panoramic views of Mullaghmore head.




A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:


Guy Adams wrote this review on Jun 28th 2016:

There is a water tap on the South Quay but you will need your own hosepipe

Average Rating: Unrated

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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.