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Ballycrovane Harbour

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Overview





Ballycrovane Harbour is a small rocky inlet situated in the northeast corner of Coulagh Bay on the south bank of the Kenmare River on the southwest coast of Ireland in County Cork. It is approximately 18 miles west of Glengarriff, and is part of the Beara Peninsula.

Ballycrovane Harbour is a small rocky inlet situated in the northeast corner of Coulagh Bay on the south bank of the Kenmare River on the southwest coast of Ireland in County Cork. It is approximately 18 miles west of Glengarriff, and is part of the Beara Peninsula.

The approach to this little harbour with a leading wind is perfectly safe and offers a sheltered well protected anchorage, and the recommended location is in the centre of the harbour with a depth of 7 metres.



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Keyfacts for Ballycrovane Harbour



Last modified
May 11th 2018

Summary

A good location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Slipway available


Nature
Remote or quiet secluded locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this locationNote: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 42.751' N, 009° 57.300' W

this is the position at the anchorage in Ballycrovane Harbour

What is the initial fix?

The following Kilmakilloge Harbour initial fix will set up a final approach:
51° 42.316' N, 010° 6.649' W
this is at the entrance to the Kenmare River midway between Lambs Head and Cods Head


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Ballycrovane Harbour for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Ardgroom Harbour - 2.4 miles NE
  2. Castletownbere (Castletown Bearhaven) - 2.7 miles SSE
  3. Mill Cove - 3 miles SE
  4. Dunboy Bay & Traillaun Harbour - 3 miles SSE
  5. West Cove - 3.1 miles NW
  6. Kilmakilloge Harbour - 3.6 miles NE
  7. Sneem Harbour - 3.9 miles NNE
  8. Lawrence Cove - 4.2 miles SE
  9. Lonehort Harbour - 4.6 miles SE
  10. Darrynane Harbour - 4.8 miles WNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Ardgroom Harbour - 2.4 miles NE
  2. Castletownbere (Castletown Bearhaven) - 2.7 miles SSE
  3. Mill Cove - 3 miles SE
  4. Dunboy Bay & Traillaun Harbour - 3 miles SSE
  5. West Cove - 3.1 miles NW
  6. Kilmakilloge Harbour - 3.6 miles NE
  7. Sneem Harbour - 3.9 miles NNE
  8. Lawrence Cove - 4.2 miles SE
  9. Lonehort Harbour - 4.6 miles SE
  10. Darrynane Harbour - 4.8 miles WNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?
Ballycrovane Quay
Image: John Eagle


Set into a niche in the eastern bight of Coulagh Bay, Ballycrovane Harbour, about 200 metres wide and 300 metres long, has room for several vessels to moor in depths of 10 to 15 metres in sand. Ballycrovane is the only sheltered anchorage which this dangerous bay affords as it is exposed to winds from the west, and both during and after bad weather a heavy sea runs in.

Coulagh Bay is a large open bay on the Atlantic coast situated at the mouth of the Kenmare River and its shores are rocky. From Carrigeel to Eyeries Island, the coast is covered with dangerous outlying rocks, which are seldom free from breakers. Bulligmore, with 2.1 metres of cover, is one of the outermost of these, with a patch of 4.6 metres beyond it, stretching halfway across the bay towards Inishfarnard. These break in gales.

The alignment 238°T, astern, of The Bull and the northwest side of Cod's Head leads northeast clears all these dangers on the approach to Ballycrovane Harbour.

Entered between Reemore Point and Kilcatherine Point, Coulagh Bay has a series of small inlets full of nooks and crannies, and the south and particularly the eastern parts of the bay are encumbered with a number of rocks. South of Kilcatherine Point and to the east of Inishfarnad Island in Coulagh Bay there is a large fish farm installation to steer well clear of.

The 200 metres wide entrance to Ballycrovane Harbour in the northeast corner of Coulagh Bay lies between Illaunnamenla, a rocky islet 7 metres high, and Gurteen Rock which lies 100 metres off the southern shore.

Haven location Anchor about 250 metres east of Illaunnamenla making note of the reef that extends 100 metres from its northeastern point. From the anchorage a landing can be made at Ballycrovane Quay which is busy with local fishing boats. For this reason, you may not be able to come alongside although a dinghy landing at the adjacent slip should be possible.


Why visit here?
Ballycrovane Harbour is an ideal location to drop into for an overnight stop whilst passing the mouth of the Kenmare River. Although it has no facilities this area of the Beara Peninsula is incredibly beautiful, and has the spectacular scenary of the Slieve Miskish mountains overlooking Coulagh Bay as a backdrop.

The area forms part of the Beara Peninsula which is shared between the counties of Kerry and Cork, and this area is visited less than the Ring of Kerry and the Dingle Peninsula which makes it a quieter alternative for visitors than its northern neighbouring peninsula's. The area around Ballycrovane Harbour forms part of the Beara Way long distance walking route which is a 128 mile circular trail around the Beara Peninsula starting and ending at Glengarriff, and which is reputed to be the most scenic route in all Ireland. The Beara Peninsula which separates Bantry Bay from the Kenmare River was named after a Spanish Princess, Princess Beara, and has over 500 historical sites dating back to 2000 BC making it one of the locations for the highest number of antiquities in one area in Ireland. The oldest writing on a stone in Ireland is Pre – Ogham and can be found in Glentastel, Lauragh.

Situated near the village of Eyeries, Ballycrovane is most famous as the location of reputedly the tallest standing stone in the world at 16 feet. Ballycrovane Ogham Stone, Irish : Beal A' Chorraigh Bhain, is probably not local as the texture does not match the gritty rocks that surround it. It overlooks Ballycrovane Harbour which may give some clue to its original purpose, possibly some sort of day-mark or more likely a navigational aid. Inscribed in Ogham – MAQI DECCEDDAS AVI TURANIAS translates as “Son of Deich the descendant of Turainn” and probably dates from the early medieval period though many believe it to be much older.

Eyeries, historically spelt Irees or Iries, Irish : na hAorai, was also the location for the shooting of the film The Purple Taxi in 1977 starring Fred Astaire, Peter Ustinov and Charlotte Rampling, and also the 1998 TV series Falling for a Dancer, a dramatisation of life and love in the 1930's Ireland based on the novel by Deidre Purcell.


What facilities are available?
there are no facilities at Ballycrovane Harbour


With thanks to:
eoceanic.com site research


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.












Aerial View




Fishing from Ballycrovane and wider views of the area.


About Ballycrovane Harbour

Ballycrovane Harbour is an ideal location to drop into for an overnight stop whilst passing the mouth of the Kenmare River. Although it has no facilities this area of the Beara Peninsula is incredibly beautiful, and has the spectacular scenary of the Slieve Miskish mountains overlooking Coulagh Bay as a backdrop.

The area forms part of the Beara Peninsula which is shared between the counties of Kerry and Cork, and this area is visited less than the Ring of Kerry and the Dingle Peninsula which makes it a quieter alternative for visitors than its northern neighbouring peninsula's. The area around Ballycrovane Harbour forms part of the Beara Way long distance walking route which is a 128 mile circular trail around the Beara Peninsula starting and ending at Glengarriff, and which is reputed to be the most scenic route in all Ireland. The Beara Peninsula which separates Bantry Bay from the Kenmare River was named after a Spanish Princess, Princess Beara, and has over 500 historical sites dating back to 2000 BC making it one of the locations for the highest number of antiquities in one area in Ireland. The oldest writing on a stone in Ireland is Pre – Ogham and can be found in Glentastel, Lauragh.

Situated near the village of Eyeries, Ballycrovane is most famous as the location of reputedly the tallest standing stone in the world at 16 feet. Ballycrovane Ogham Stone, Irish : Beal A' Chorraigh Bhain, is probably not local as the texture does not match the gritty rocks that surround it. It overlooks Ballycrovane Harbour which may give some clue to its original purpose, possibly some sort of day-mark or more likely a navigational aid. Inscribed in Ogham – MAQI DECCEDDAS AVI TURANIAS translates as “Son of Deich the descendant of Turainn” and probably dates from the early medieval period though many believe it to be much older.

Eyeries, historically spelt Irees or Iries, Irish : na hAorai, was also the location for the shooting of the film The Purple Taxi in 1977 starring Fred Astaire, Peter Ustinov and Charlotte Rampling, and also the 1998 TV series Falling for a Dancer, a dramatisation of life and love in the 1930's Ireland based on the novel by Deidre Purcell.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Ardgroom Harbour - 2.4 miles NE
Kilmakilloge Harbour - 3.6 miles NE
Dunkerron - 9.3 miles NE
Sneem Harbour - 3.9 miles NNE
West Cove - 3.1 miles NW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Garnish Bay - 5.4 miles SW
Dursey Sound - 5.9 miles SW
Dunboy Bay & Traillaun Harbour - 3 miles SSE
Castletownbere (Castletown Bearhaven) - 2.7 miles SSE
Mill Cove - 3 miles SE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Ballycrovane Harbour.








Aerial View




Fishing from Ballycrovane and wider views of the area.



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.