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Bertraghboy Bay

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Overview






Please note

eOceanic has been made aware of this haven. We are looking for a sailor with first-hand experience to provide their direct personal insights so that we may complete our write up. In advance of this we have posted these preliminary research notes. Do you know this location? Please contact us or click the 'Report a Mistake or Omission' button below to help share this location with the sailing community.


Bertraghboy Bay, also known as Birterbury Bay, is an inlet bight off the Big Sound on the northern approaches to Galway Bay situated about midway between Golam Head and Slyne Head, immediately to the east of Roundstone Bay and approximately 36 miles to the west of Galway itself, on the west coast of Ireland. The bay affords many secure anchorages which are used as a quieter location than its near neighbour Roundstone Bay, and an opportunity for a dinghy landing at the small pier at Pats Point, in a scenic secluded and peaceful setting with mountain views.

Once into the bay it affords good shelter from all quarters in all reasonable winds and seas depending on the choice of anchorage, although the access requires attentive navigation as there are a number of dangers around the entrance.
Please note

There are several fish farm cages in the approaches making a daytime approach preferable.




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Keyfacts for Bertraghboy Bay
Facilities
Shop with basic provisions availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this locationNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3 metres (9.84 feet).

Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
May 30th 2017

Summary

A good location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Shop with basic provisions availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this locationNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 24.966' N, 009° 49.712' W

This is the position at the pier quay at the head of Cashel Bay

What is the initial fix?

The following Roundstone initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 20.836' N, 009° 56.027' W
in the Atlantic Ocean midway between Gorteen Bay peninsula and Mace Head



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Bertraghboy Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Roundstone - 2.1 miles WSW
  2. Gorteen Bay - 3.2 miles WSW
  3. Kilkieran Bay - 4.1 miles SSE
  4. Clifden - 5.2 miles WNW
  5. Clifden Boat Club - 5.6 miles WNW
  6. Dinish & Furness Islands - 5.9 miles SSE
  7. Bunowen Bay - 6.4 miles W
  8. Greatman's Bay - 6.4 miles SE
  9. Mannin Bay - 6.7 miles WNW
  10. Ballynakill Harbour - 6.7 miles NNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Roundstone - 2.1 miles WSW
  2. Gorteen Bay - 3.2 miles WSW
  3. Kilkieran Bay - 4.1 miles SSE
  4. Clifden - 5.2 miles WNW
  5. Clifden Boat Club - 5.6 miles WNW
  6. Dinish & Furness Islands - 5.9 miles SSE
  7. Bunowen Bay - 6.4 miles W
  8. Greatman's Bay - 6.4 miles SE
  9. Mannin Bay - 6.7 miles WNW
  10. Ballynakill Harbour - 6.7 miles NNW
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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
Route location The 'Loop Head to Slyne Head' coastal description provides approach information to the suggested initial fix. Vessels approaching from the south should select the northbound Route location sequenced description; vessels approaching from the north should select the southbound Route location sequence; western approaches may use either description.

From its entrance the bay heads north for 1.25 miles before turning inland northeast for a further two miles. Cloonile Bay is a northern branch of Bertraghboy Bay located on the east side of Inishnee Island that divides it from Roundstone Bay to the west. At its head Bertraghboy Bay divides into two forks, Cashel Bay also known as Traghboy Bay is the northern arm, and Gowla Cove is the southern arm.

The more recognised popular anchorages in Bertraghboy Bay are, off a bold bluff in south winds halfway between the entrance to Bertraghboy Bay and Carrickaleigh Rock where you can land at the old ruined pier; to the east side of Croghnut Islet which gives good shelter but rather a poor landing over weed covered rocks; and north of Salt Point which gives good shelter in west winds.


Why visit here?
The many anchorages of Bertraghboy Bay and its branches are used as a quieter and less busy location than its near neighbour Roundstone Bay which is a tourist mecca particularly during the summer holiday season.

Although there are not too many opportunities for a landing, mainly due to the lack of villages on the shorelines, nevertheless the main bay and its three subsidiary branches make for interesting locations to explore by boat.

Of the many anchorages the following are some of the more useful ones :- temporary shelter can be found immediately on entering Bertraghboy Bay off the east side of Inishlackan Island where there is a good anchorage off a small sandy beach south of Mountain View Lodge and there is a small pier which dries alongside at Pats Point just north of the anchorage. In southerly winds there is a good anchorage in 2 metres depth on the south shore of the bay off a bold bluff half way between the entrance and Carricklaleagh (Leagh Rock) about 1.25 miles east of Innishtreh but this location is open to winds from west through north to northeast and has a possible landing at a ruined pier although no stores are available. An anchorage can be obtained between Oghly Island and midway between Rosroe Point and Salt Point on the mainland to the northeast in 10 metres depth; and in westerly winds good shelter can be found on the east side of Salt Point opposite Canower Point in 3 metres depth.

Lovely Cashel Bay, the northern fork of Bertraghboy Bay is encumbered with shoals of oyster banks but a good anchorage can be found inside the entrance on the east side of Canover Point in 3 metres depth. At the northern head of the bay off the north west shore opposite the quay a further anchorage can be obtained in 3 metres depth; it is possible to land at the quay which is in a pretty rough state but it is advisable not to attempt to come up to it before half flood and to check that the bottom alongside is clean especially for rocks at the entrance before going alongside or drying out. Water is available from a well just above the quay and there is a shop 0.25 mile up the road and two excellent hotels within one mile. At high water it is possible to take a dinghy through a maze of rocks to the head of the bay and land at a small quay below one of the hotels.

At Gowla Cove, the southern fork of Bertraghboy Bay there is an excellent anchorage giving good shelter southeast of Crognut Island with 4 metres depth.

Cloonile Bay, the narrow well sheltered north arm of Bertraghboy Bay, has two anchorages although note that there is a considerable tide here especially with a spring ebb and the Ballynahinch River in flood, and also the Roscoe Reef dries and extends almost right across at low water.There is an anchorage in the bay north of Church Point in 2 metres depth and a further anchorage can be found at the head of the bay at Cloonile Quay in 2 metres depth.

Cloonile Quay is interesting in that it was designed by the famous Scottish scientist and engineer Alexander Nimmo who was also responsible for the formation of the village of nearby Roundstone. In 1825 he had the quay built especially for the shipment of the beautiful green marble from the Twelve Pins mountains, using money provided for relief works following the famine of 1822. Built by local labour using the technique of dry stone walling, Nimmo later reported that the quay had been finished by Thomas Martin of Ballynahinch.

Lying at the head of the beautiful Cashel Bay the townland derives its name from the ringfort or cashel which surrounds the present day graveyard. Cashel Hill stands at the top of the bay and it is well worth taking the walk to its summit for some of the breathtaking views of the surrounding area where traditional livelihoods still abound such as seaweed harvesting and turf cutting.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities at Bertraghboy Bay, Gowla Cove and Cloonile Bay.
At Cashel Bay there is water available from a well just above the quay and a shop for stores 0.25 mile up the road. One mile from the quay there is a choice of two excellent hotels which have bars and restaurants.


With thanks to:
inyourfootsteps.com site research.


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