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Stradbally Cove

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Overview





Stradbally Cove is a small coastal inlet situated approximately six miles northeast of Dungarvan and eighteen miles west of the Waterford Harbour Estuary. It provides an offshore anchorage outside a secluded and scenic bay.

Stradbally Cove is a small coastal inlet situated approximately six miles northeast of Dungarvan and eighteen miles west of the Waterford Harbour Estuary. It provides an offshore anchorage outside a secluded and scenic bay.

The entirely drying inlet extends inland into the surrounding, predominantly high, south-facing coastline. This means that boats have to anchor well outside and are completely exposed to the prevailing winds. Stradbally Cove may therefore only be used in settled or light offshore conditions. However, it has good sand holding and has unimpeded seaward approaches making access and anchoring very straightforward.
Please note

This is less than an ideal place to spend an extended amount of time, and it would not be a place to anchor overnight as you would most likely be rolling uncomfortably.




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Keyfacts for Stradbally Cove



Last modified
May 4th 2018

Summary

An exposed location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Shop with basic provisions availablePublic house or wine bar in the areaPleasant family beach in the areaPost Office in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityRemote or quiet secluded locationScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 7.100' N, 007° 27.659' W

In the middle of seaward end of the cove.

What is the initial fix?

The following Stradbally Cove initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 6.760' N, 007° 27.485' W
This waypoint is 400 metres outside the bay so you can appraise the current conditions and decide if you would like to come in.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Stradbally Cove for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 2.9 miles WSW
  2. Helvick - 3.1 miles SW
  3. Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 3.7 miles ENE
  4. Dungarvan Town Quay - 3.7 miles WSW
  5. Ardmore Bay - 8.6 miles SW
  6. Port of Waterford - 9.7 miles NE
  7. Little Island - 10.2 miles ENE
  8. Youghal - 10.7 miles SW
  9. Dunmore East - 10.8 miles E
  10. Creadan Head - 11.9 miles ENE
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 2.9 miles WSW
  2. Helvick - 3.1 miles SW
  3. Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 3.7 miles ENE
  4. Dungarvan Town Quay - 3.7 miles WSW
  5. Ardmore Bay - 8.6 miles SW
  6. Port of Waterford - 9.7 miles NE
  7. Little Island - 10.2 miles ENE
  8. Youghal - 10.7 miles SW
  9. Dunmore East - 10.8 miles E
  10. Creadan Head - 11.9 miles ENE
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence






Stradbally Cove is a shallow secluded cove where the River Tay falls into the ocean. It is located about four miles northeast of Ballynacourty Point and eleven miles west of Tramore Bay.

Western Approach Between Dungarvan Bay and Great Newtown Head, for a distance of 12 miles, the coast is largely characterised by precipitous sea cliffs, groups of stacks, caves, arches and storm beaches that provide much visual interest. It is fringed by detached masses of rock, with occasional islets and inlets such as Stradbally Cove that are clear of outlying dangers.

A useful mark for vessels approaching from the west is the 68 metre high Ballyvoyle Head situated a mile and a half to the southwest of Stradbally Cove. It can be distinguished by the ruins of the square tower and Clonea Castle that stands close north of the headland.




Eastern Approach For vessels approaching from the east, Burke and Sheep islands are clusters of bold rocky islets, lying about 2 miles to 2.5 miles to the west of Great Newtown Head, and extending half a mile from the shore. They are clear of outlying dangers. A useful mark to the east is Bunmahon situated about 3.6 miles east-northeast of Stradbally Cove. The rock is mostly red sandstone or conglomerate, and the coast has a history of mining for copper in the 1800’s. Some of the ventilation shafts are visible from the sea. The buildings and tall stacks in the Bunmahon village are conspicuous from offshore. The square tower of the disused Bunmahon "Church of Ireland" will be seen up the hill from the village.


Initial fix location Come straight in from the initial fix as there are no off lying dangers.

Haven location Find a depth that you are comfortable with for your vessel, and drop anchor in sand. Stradbally Cove shelves gradually so it will be unlikely to be able to come in any closer than a quarter of a mile out from the shore. It would also be prudent to make a note of the tide when anchoring. Land by tender on the beach.
Please note

The beach gradually shelves so be prepared for a long tender carry on tides.




What's the story here?
Stradbally Cove, in Gaelic Cuas na Straidbhaile, is a lovely secluded beach where the River Tay has cut a deep cove along a fault line in the volcanic rock and soft brown shales. The name Stradbally is the English form of the Irish word Sradbhaile meaning ‘street-town’. This was used to describe a village consisting of a single street that was undefended by either walls or castle and was a small unfortified hamlet. Being a generic description it is the name of several villages, parishes, and townlands in the southern half of Ireland. Akin to many of county Waterford's river names, the origin and meaning of the river's name, Taoi or Tay, is however no longer known.

What is striking about the beautiful cove is the number of trees that grow along its ridges and up the valley of the river. This is largely thanks to Maurice Uniake an early 1740s local landowner. He planted in excess of 150,000 trees here covering almost all of the lower three kilometres of the Tay valley with a wide mixture of species. He introduced both native and exotic trees and what can be seen today are all the direct descendants of his plantings. The native shrubs, including Furze/Gorse, Blackthorn and Hawthorn, are all tolerant to salt spray and thrive near the outer parts of the cove. The native trees are Oak, Ash, Hazel and Alder which stand alongside the introduced Beech, Sycamore, Scots Pine and Norway Spruce.

Early season sailors should come up from the cove and stroll into the woods. In April and May, large sections are carpeted in bluebells. This sight is rare in the rest of Europe but characteristic of Ireland and Britain; bluebells thrive in the British Isles mild wet climate, helped by the absence of wild pigs who tend to eat the bulbs.

The small village of Stradbally is approximately 3 KM away and is made up of a village green with a square as the focal point of four converging roads. It is a pretty village with medieval origins and attractive thatched cottages that will be seen along the way from the cove. The area is characterised by landscaped, planted open spaces with stone boundary walls, and it has won numerous awards in the National Tidy Towns Competition.

Stradbally Cove is not by any measure a great anchorage, and is one that could only be used on a very settled day. In good conditions, it makes for a nice lunch stop and place to go ashore for a short amount of time to have a picnic or a walk. It would be a perfect place to land a family to play, swim and enjoy the spectacular forests that surround this cove and river.


What facilities are available?
There is nothing in Stradbally Cove save for a landing beach. The village of Stradbally is located approximately 13km from Dungarvan, and approximately 7.5km south of the N25 to Waterford (near Kilmacthomas). Stradbally's services comprise of two Public houses, one of which also functions as a tea garden, a local shop (which also provides a Post Office outlet), and a butcher's shop.


Any security concerns?
You are most likely to be completely alone at this beach and away from any interference.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photographs Michael Harpur and Anthea.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.


















A photo montage if the area


About Stradbally Cove

Stradbally Cove, in Gaelic Cuas na Straidbhaile, is a lovely secluded beach where the River Tay has cut a deep cove along a fault line in the volcanic rock and soft brown shales. The name Stradbally is the English form of the Irish word Sradbhaile meaning ‘street-town’. This was used to describe a village consisting of a single street that was undefended by either walls or castle and was a small unfortified hamlet. Being a generic description it is the name of several villages, parishes, and townlands in the southern half of Ireland. Akin to many of county Waterford's river names, the origin and meaning of the river's name, Taoi or Tay, is however no longer known.

What is striking about the beautiful cove is the number of trees that grow along its ridges and up the valley of the river. This is largely thanks to Maurice Uniake an early 1740s local landowner. He planted in excess of 150,000 trees here covering almost all of the lower three kilometres of the Tay valley with a wide mixture of species. He introduced both native and exotic trees and what can be seen today are all the direct descendants of his plantings. The native shrubs, including Furze/Gorse, Blackthorn and Hawthorn, are all tolerant to salt spray and thrive near the outer parts of the cove. The native trees are Oak, Ash, Hazel and Alder which stand alongside the introduced Beech, Sycamore, Scots Pine and Norway Spruce.

Early season sailors should come up from the cove and stroll into the woods. In April and May, large sections are carpeted in bluebells. This sight is rare in the rest of Europe but characteristic of Ireland and Britain; bluebells thrive in the British Isles mild wet climate, helped by the absence of wild pigs who tend to eat the bulbs.

The small village of Stradbally is approximately 3 KM away and is made up of a village green with a square as the focal point of four converging roads. It is a pretty village with medieval origins and attractive thatched cottages that will be seen along the way from the cove. The area is characterised by landscaped, planted open spaces with stone boundary walls, and it has won numerous awards in the National Tidy Towns Competition.

Stradbally Cove is not by any measure a great anchorage, and is one that could only be used on a very settled day. In good conditions, it makes for a nice lunch stop and place to go ashore for a short amount of time to have a picnic or a walk. It would be a perfect place to land a family to play, swim and enjoy the spectacular forests that surround this cove and river.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 2.9 miles WSW
Dungarvan Town Quay - 3.7 miles WSW
Helvick - 3.1 miles SW
Ardmore Bay - 8.6 miles SW
Youghal - 10.7 miles SW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Dunabrattin (Boatstrand) - 3.7 miles ENE
Dunmore East - 10.8 miles E
Creadan Head - 11.9 miles ENE
Passage East - 12 miles ENE
Cheekpoint - 12.1 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Stradbally Cove.
















A photo montage if the area



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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