England Ireland Find Havens
England Ireland Find Routes
Boat
Maintenance
Comfort
Operations
Safety
Other



NextPrevious

Kinvara Bay

Tides and tools
Overview





Kinvara Bay, Irish : Cinn Mhara (or more recently Cuan Chinn Mhara) meaning “head of the sea” is a south eastern inlet of South Bay, part of Galway Bay, in County Galway on the west coast of Ireland. Kinvara is occasionally spelled Kinvarra in English; this may be seen on some maps and roadsigns, although Kinvara is the most common spelling used nowadays.

The approach to Kinvara Bay is via the Doorus Straight, and the entrance is between Doorus Point and Comb Rock. There are no marks for the deep water entrance approach between Madrallan Rock and Goragh Rock and this passage should therefore be made with great care and continuous use of the echosounder.

Less than half a mile from the bay's entrance on the west shore is a good anchorage in a depth of 4 metres abreast of Parkmore Quay near the village of Bush, where the pierhead dries at 1.5 metres and the shelter is quite good.

The bay affords another anchorage approximately one mile further inland from Bush in 2 metres depth between Goormeen Rock and Cruckeen Island, but care is necessary to avoid the shellfish beds and the fish farms located in this area.

At neaps, it is reported that there is also an anchorage in a depth of 1 metre at low water off Knivara village some 2.5 miles south southeast of Bush at the head of the bay, where there is a handy slipway suitable for a dinghy landing, or alternatively berth at the south or west side in the small harbour. The bottom of shingle and stone is suitable for drying out and it is the only spot in the inlet free of mud at low water.



Be the first
to comment
Keyfacts for Kinvara Bay
Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPharmacy in the area


Nature
Anchoring locationScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this location

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
4 metres (13.12 feet).

Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
July 19th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPharmacy in the area


Nature
Anchoring locationScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this location



Position and approaches
Expand to new tab or fullscreen

Haven position

53° 10.291' N, 008° 58.028' W

this is the position at the pierhead at Parkmore Quay, Bush, at Kinvara Bay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Kinvara Bay initial fix. will set up a final approach:
53° 11.644' N, 009° 17.050' W
this is the position in the middle of Galway Bay between Black Head and Spiddle.



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Kinvara Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 1.3 miles N
  2. Aughinish Bay - 2.5 miles WSW
  3. Galway Docks - 4.1 miles NNW
  4. Ballyvaughan Bay - 4.4 miles WSW
  5. Fanore Bay - 7.7 miles WSW
  6. Spiddle - 8 miles WNW
  7. Doolin Pier (Ballaghaline Quay) - 11.4 miles WSW
  8. Liscannor Bay - 12.8 miles SW
  9. Inisheer - 13 miles WSW
  10. Rossaveal - 13.7 miles WNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 1.3 miles N
  2. Aughinish Bay - 2.5 miles WSW
  3. Galway Docks - 4.1 miles NNW
  4. Ballyvaughan Bay - 4.4 miles WSW
  5. Fanore Bay - 7.7 miles WSW
  6. Spiddle - 8 miles WNW
  7. Doolin Pier (Ballaghaline Quay) - 11.4 miles WSW
  8. Liscannor Bay - 12.8 miles SW
  9. Inisheer - 13 miles WSW
  10. Rossaveal - 13.7 miles WNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search

Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

Expand to new tab or fullscreen



How to get in?
inyourfootsteps.com has identified this as a boat haven and asks readers with first-hand experience to contact us so we may fully write up this location. In the meantime we have posted our preliminary research notes alongside the haven position, tidal data, current wind and weather, satellite images plus charting information.

If, on the other hand, you have been to this haven and experienced it, please contact us by clicking the “Correct” button below. If you could provide us with your details so we may contact you, or indeed send us information directly, it would be very much appreciated. This will enable us to complete this Haven, sharing it for the common good of the entire sailing community.


Why visit here?
The village of Kinvara situated at the head of Kinvara Bay is located in the far south of County Galway sixteen miles from Galway City and Airport, on the edge of the renowned region called The Burren, on the southern shore of Galway Bay.

The Burren, an area of great rocky expanse of hauntingly beautiful limestone hills and mountains is considered by many to be a unique landscape. Limestone areas like The Burren are famous for their large cave systems, and there are two caves in the area which are open to the public, the Aillee Caves, and since 2006 the Doolin Cave with one of the largest stalactites known to the world.

The south side and the low lying head of Galway Bay have shallow and rocky meandering inlets that offer some interesting navigation but usually involve drying berths alongside piers, such as Kinvara, which has often been described in tourist guides as a picturesque seaside village, and few will argue with that description.

Kinvara developed around an O' hEidhin (O'Hynes) towerhouse (now completely demolished) close to the main pier and the medieval church of St. Comman or St. Caimin (now in ruins) which is situated between the main road through the village and Ceibh a'Cheile, the oldest part of the quay. The church of St. Caimin dates to the early 13th century but is built on the site of St. Caimin's original early medieval church. It belongs to the style of architecture known as the School of the West which was a style of building in use in Connacht before the English invasion of the kingdom in the early 13th century.

Dunguaire Castle, Irish : Dun Guaire meaning the castle of Guaire, one of the principal townhouses of the O' hEidhin (O'Hynes) clan, is located to the east of Kinvara village; the castle was built in the early 16th century by Eamonn O' hEidhin and was occupied by Fiacha O' hEidhin towards the end of the same century. This towerhouse is believed to have been built on or close to the site of Durlas Guaire the main residence of Guaire Aidne mac Colmain, the 7th century king of Ui Fhiachrach and Connacht. The rath, an earthen enclosure on the small peninsula east of Dun Guaire is thought to be the remains of Durlas Guaire, also called Rath Durlais. Interestingly Dunguaire Castle was used as a filming location for the Scottish castle home of the main character in the 1979 film North Sea Hijack. At the present time medieval banquets are held at Dunguaire Castle.

During the War of Independence the first shots of the 1916 Easter Rising in County Galway were fired in Kinvara. The incident took place outside the curate's house on the Green Road when the Royal Irish Constabulary attempted to arrest local members of Oglaigh na hEireann.

Every year Kinvara is the home to two festivals, Fleadh na gCuach, the cuckoo festival, an Irish music festival at the beginning of May about which time the cuckoo is first heard, and Cruinniu na mBad, the gathering of the boats, in mid August. The latter festival is the larger and longer running, and it celebrates the traditional sailing craft the Galway Hookers, and the trade they once did between Kinvara and the north of County Clare and the west of County Galway. The festival started in 1979 and features a series of boat races as well as a variety of other events on the pier. The cuckoo festival which started much later in 1994 is a festival of Irish music that celebrates the old Irish festival of Bealtaine, the first of May, which in Ireland marks the start of summer.



What facilities are available?
Amentities and facilities at Kinvara village include, village shops, supermarket, butcher, chemist, post office, hotel and B & B's, pub and restaurant, and top up fuel and fresh water is available from the local garage.


With thanks to:
inyourfootsteps.com site research.


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.













VHF Harbour Master call sign 'Galway Harbour Radio', Harbour Office, New Docks, Galway +353 91 561874/562329.



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:

Please log in to leave a review of this haven.



Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.