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Seven Heads Bay

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Overview





Seven Heads Bay is located on the southwest coast of Ireland about twenty miles southwest of Cork Harbour and on the eastern side of Seven Heads, the western peninsula and the entrance to Courtmacsherry Bay. It offers a convenient anchorage in a secluded location with a small pier and slip to land.

Seven Heads Bay is located on the southwest coast of Ireland about twenty miles southwest of Cork Harbour and on the eastern side of Seven Heads, the western peninsula and the entrance to Courtmacsherry Bay. It offers a convenient anchorage in a secluded location with a small pier and slip to land.

Seven Heads Bay provides a good anchorage from westerly and northerly winds behind its moderatly high southern shoulder. Access is straightforward as the bay is free of outlying dangers with deep water up to the head of the bay.



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Keyfacts for Seven Heads Bay
Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
7 metres (22.97 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
April 7th 2021

Summary

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 35.422' N, 008° 42.073' W

This is the position at the anchorage in the bay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Seven Heads Bay initial fix will set up a final approach:
51° 35.495' N, 008° 40.670' W
This is in deep water east of the bay.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.

  • Keep clear of Cotton Rock close to Seven Heads the only local hazard

  • The Bay and its approaches are clear



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Seven Heads Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Blindstrand Bay - 0.9 miles NNE
  2. Broadstrand Bay - 1.1 miles N
  3. Dunworly Bay - 1.4 miles W
  4. Courtmacsherry - 1.7 miles N
  5. Coolmain Bay - 2 miles NNE
  6. Clonakilty Harbour (Ring) - 3.4 miles W
  7. Holeopen Bay West - 3.6 miles ENE
  8. Holeopen Bay East - 4 miles ENE
  9. Dunnycove Bay - 4.5 miles WSW
  10. Sandy Cove - 5.3 miles NE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Blindstrand Bay - 0.9 miles NNE
  2. Broadstrand Bay - 1.1 miles N
  3. Dunworly Bay - 1.4 miles W
  4. Courtmacsherry - 1.7 miles N
  5. Coolmain Bay - 2 miles NNE
  6. Clonakilty Harbour (Ring) - 3.4 miles W
  7. Holeopen Bay West - 3.6 miles ENE
  8. Holeopen Bay East - 4 miles ENE
  9. Dunnycove Bay - 4.5 miles WSW
  10. Sandy Cove - 5.3 miles NE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Seven Heads Bay as seen form the south
Image: Darren J Spoonley Photography External link


Seven Heads Bay lies on the western shore of Courtmacsherry Bay that is entered between Seven Heads and the Old Head of Kinsale, a distance of 7 miles in an east-by-south direction. The secluded bay is situated 1½ miles northward of Seven Heads and lies between Poulna Point and Carrigrour Point. It has a small pier and slipway where it is possible to land and a road leading above.

Seven Heads Bay affords shelter from westerly and northerly winds with good holding ground. Its north shore rises almost perpendicularly to a height of 104.2 metres, from which it falls rather abruptly northward to Barry Point. This offers good wind protection and with the southern side of the bay being steep-too close in it is possible to make the best of it.


How to get in?
Seven Heads with Cotton Rock just breaking as seen from the approaches to the
bay

Image: Burke Corbett


Convergance Point Use southwestern Ireland’s coastal overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location for coastal planning. The bay can be positively identified by the Seven Heads headland of which the bay lies 1½ miles northeastward. Seven Heads is the prominent mark for the bay being a bold bluff headland with an old signal tower standing at an elevation of 40 metres close north of Leganagh Point. Two smaller World War II watchtower can be seen close southwest of the old tower. The bottom around the head is uneven and rocky, causing overfalls during the strength of the tide.


Cotton Rock
Image: Bart Lohuizen External link

Vessels approaching from all directions will find clear water on approach to Seven Heads. The head's danger is Cotton Rock situated 300 metres out from the shore on the east side of the head. Awash at high water and drying to 3.6 metres it is situated ½ a mile northeast of Seven Heads' southernmost point.


Seven Heads Bay as seen from seaward
Image: Burke Corbett


Initial fix location From the initial fix proceed due west into the bay. The path and bay have no off-lying dangers. The bay will be readily apparent with its high hills on either side and a road descending down the centre.

The slip build onto the rocky finger of the shoreline
Image: Bart Lohuizen External link


Haven location Anchor according to draft in good sand holding. In southerly quadrant winds, the best protection will be found in the southwest corner of the bay around Poulna Point and approaching the pier and slip.

Small Pier and slip as seen from the northeast
Image: Burke Corbett


Land by tender at the slip that is set into to one of the inshore rocky fingers in the southwest corner. The location is made clear by the road leading down to it. The small pier is situated on the northeast side of a rocky finger and the slip within. It is not readily apparent until seen from northward so venture this way and then turn down onto the slip to make an approach from the northeast.


Why visit here?
Seven Head’s name is derived from the seven headlands that make up this fretted promontory that separates Clonakilty and Courtmacsherry Bays. It is this rugged nature that makes the Seven Heads Peninsula’s scenery wild and spectacular.

Seven Heads collection of headlands
Image: Darren J Spoonley Photography External link


With such assets, it should come as no surprise that it features a renowned walking route, and a dedicated booklet and route maps are available in most local shops. The entire peninsula route is 42.5 km but it has several returns, circular walks and cuts that carve out manageable sections. Although cliff scenery is central to the peninsula walks they also embrace several historical sites, a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna, and should you get lost the many friendly and chatty local people are only too happy to offer assistance.

If a large peninsula expedition is beyond the scope of a short visit, then a hike up to the top of the 100-metre high Coolum Cliffs, overlooking the north end of Seven Heads Bay, provides a more accessible jaunt. The panoramic views of Barry's Point, the Old Head Of Kinsale and Seven Heads itself are spectacular from here, whilst Dunworley Bay on the opposite side also makes for an equally good stride out and is usually an attractive surfing destination.


Placid water under the southern shoulder of the bay
Image: Burke Corbett


Although no village borders its shoreline, from a boating point of view, Seven Heads Bay is a beautiful bay to drop into. Being just a mile and a half northeast of the head, plus having clear access with good holding, it an ideal location for passage makers to make a lunch stop or overnight stay in good conditions. Likewise, with Courtmacsherry’s bar being just three miles further in, it makes a good and rewarding tide-wait location for Courtmacsherry Harbour.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities at this location save for the slip and small boat landing pier.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred at this secluded location and vessels are most likely to be entirely on there own here.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford.



About Seven Heads Bay

Seven Head’s name is derived from the seven headlands that make up this fretted promontory that separates Clonakilty and Courtmacsherry Bays. It is this rugged nature that makes the Seven Heads Peninsula’s scenery wild and spectacular.

Seven Heads collection of headlands
Image: Darren J Spoonley Photography External link


With such assets, it should come as no surprise that it features a renowned walking route, and a dedicated booklet and route maps are available in most local shops. The entire peninsula route is 42.5 km but it has several returns, circular walks and cuts that carve out manageable sections. Although cliff scenery is central to the peninsula walks they also embrace several historical sites, a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna, and should you get lost the many friendly and chatty local people are only too happy to offer assistance.

If a large peninsula expedition is beyond the scope of a short visit, then a hike up to the top of the 100-metre high Coolum Cliffs, overlooking the north end of Seven Heads Bay, provides a more accessible jaunt. The panoramic views of Barry's Point, the Old Head Of Kinsale and Seven Heads itself are spectacular from here, whilst Dunworley Bay on the opposite side also makes for an equally good stride out and is usually an attractive surfing destination.


Placid water under the southern shoulder of the bay
Image: Burke Corbett


Although no village borders its shoreline, from a boating point of view, Seven Heads Bay is a beautiful bay to drop into. Being just a mile and a half northeast of the head, plus having clear access with good holding, it an ideal location for passage makers to make a lunch stop or overnight stay in good conditions. Likewise, with Courtmacsherry’s bar being just three miles further in, it makes a good and rewarding tide-wait location for Courtmacsherry Harbour.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Dunworly Bay - 1.4 miles W
Clonakilty Harbour (Ring) - 3.4 miles W
Dunnycove Bay - 4.5 miles WSW
Dirk Bay - 5.8 miles WSW
Rosscarbery Inlet - 7.3 miles W
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Blindstrand Bay - 0.9 miles NNE
Broadstrand Bay - 1.1 miles N
Courtmacsherry - 1.7 miles N
Coolmain Bay - 2 miles NNE
Holeopen Bay West - 3.6 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Seven Heads Bay.





















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