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Rincolisky Harbour

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Overview





Located on Ireland’s southwest, to the north of Sherkin Island and northeast of Hare Island, Rincolisky Harbour is a mainland sea inlet. The area provides a secluded anchorage in a remote location close to Cunnamore ferry and fishing pier.

Located on Ireland’s southwest, to the north of Sherkin Island and northeast of Hare Island, Rincolisky Harbour is a mainland sea inlet. The area provides a secluded anchorage in a remote location close to Cunnamore ferry and fishing pier.

Enclosed behind two islands with rocky shoals and set within an inlet, Rincolisky Harbour offers good protection from all but very strong southerly winds. Approaches to the general area, from the north end of Baltimore Harbour or directly from Long Island Bay, have few marks, are intricate and challenging. So final approaches necessitate careful navigation as a vessel works its way through some rocky shoals. All of this requires settled conditions with good visibility.
Please note

Rincolisky Harbour inlet is only suitable for shallow-draft vessels but there are good depths available off Cunnamore pier. Local advice is recommended and Baltimore’s Harbour Master is familiar with Rincolisky Harbour and will be delighted to advise.




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Keyfacts for Rincolisky Harbour
Facilities
Slipway available


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 3 or more from SE, SSE, S, SSW, SW, WSW and W.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
2 stars: Careful navigation; good visibility and conditions with dangers that require careful navigation.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
September 28th 2021

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with careful navigation required for access.

Facilities
Slipway available


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 3 or more from SE, SSE, S, SSW, SW, WSW and W.Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: could be two hours or more from the main waterways



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 30.227' N, 009° 25.474' W

This is set on the head of Cunnamore pier.

What is the initial fix?

The following River Ilen Entrance Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
51° 28.575' N, 009° 26.404' W
This is set on the clearing line of bearing 230°T of Clare Island's Doonanore Castle ruins open east of Illauneana, as best seen on Admiralty 2129.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Seaward approaches and run up The Sound are covered in the Oldcourt Click to view haven River Ilen description.

  • Note the shallow area with 1.5 metres extend 400 metres north eastward from Two Woman’s Rock.

  • Proceeding northward 100 metres off the Turk Head peninsula avoids the Corrignamoe group of rocks.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Rincolisky Harbour for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. East Pier - 0.2 miles SE
  2. Trá Bán - 0.3 miles S
  3. Turk Head - 0.5 miles SE
  4. Quarantine Island - 0.6 miles ESE
  5. Kinish Harbour - 1 miles SSE
  6. Castle Ruins - 1.1 miles SSE
  7. Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE
  8. Horse Island - 1.3 miles WNW
  9. Rossbrin Cove - 1.3 miles NW
  10. Horseshoe Harbour - 1.3 miles SSE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. East Pier - 0.2 miles SE
  2. Trá Bán - 0.3 miles S
  3. Turk Head - 0.5 miles SE
  4. Quarantine Island - 0.6 miles ESE
  5. Kinish Harbour - 1 miles SSE
  6. Castle Ruins - 1.1 miles SSE
  7. Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE
  8. Horse Island - 1.3 miles WNW
  9. Rossbrin Cove - 1.3 miles NW
  10. Horseshoe Harbour - 1.3 miles SSE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Rincolisky Harbour as seen from Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Rincolisky Harbour is a narrow mainland inlet situated between the Turk Head promontory, to the east and Cunnamore Point to the west. It is further protected to the southwest by Hare Island. A ferry service operates from the modern Cunnamore Pier to Hare Island. Sited on a steep shoreline hillock, that descends into the opposite Roaring Water Bay, the remaining two storeys that survive of Rincolisky Castle still prominently overlook the harbour from the north.


Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Rincolisky Harbour is narrow and shallow having about 1 metre LAT at its entrance which lessens gradually to 0.3 metres LAT ver a bottom of soft oozy mud bank, dry at the ebb. Boats that can take to the bottom will find an excellent berth here along the western shore. Close off Cunnamore Pier depths of up to 2.4 metres will be found.


Boats that can take to the bottom will find excellent shelter
Image: Michael Harpur



How to get in?
The seaward approach to Rincolisky Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Seaward approaches and run up The Sound, from Baltimore Harbour, are covered in the Oldcourt Click to view haven River Ilen description as the anchorage lies off of its approach path.


Rincolisky Castle and White Hall as seen when approaching The Catalogues
Image: Burke Corbett


When abreast of Two Woman’s Rock prepare to break off this track but steer northwest to clear a shallow area with 1.5 metres over it that extends about 400 metres from Two Woman’s Rock. Once clear of this steer about 340°T for 700 metres to Rincolisky Harbour.

The run from the Ilen and the Turk Head peninsula to Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


The principal dangers in the final approach to Rincolisky Harbour are the Corrignamoe group of rocks that lie to the northeast of Heir Island. The east-most rocks of the group are covered at half-tide and are situated immediately east of a line that would join Heir Island pier and Cunnamore's outer breakwater.


The shadows of the covered eastern Corrignamoe group rocks just visible
Image: Michael Harpur


Preferring the mainland side of this body of water, between the Turk Head peninsula and Hare Island, keeping about 100 metres off the eastern shoreline, will keep a vessel in the best water well clear of the Corrignamoe group. Continue along the mainland shore until after Heir Island pier is passed abreast, to port, and then a further 100 metres or so until the pier bears northwest, maintaining a distance of 150 metres from the mainland shoreline.


Small boat rounding the cardinal and approaching Cunnamore Pierpier
Image: Michael Harpur


Then round in passing the north cardinal moored off Cunnamore pier on its correct side. Shallower draft vessels may continue on into the Rincolisky Harbour inlet on this path.


The Hare Island ferry comming alongside Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Rincolisky Harbour inlet offers depths from 0.6 metres to about 1 metre with the deeper water found off the eastern shore. Close off Cunnamore Pier depths up to 2.4 metres will be found.


Local boat moorings in Rincolisky Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Land by tender at the slip within Cunnamore Pier or on the flats or jetties along the shore of the inlet.


Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur



Why visit here?
First recorded as 'Rinecoolecusky' in 1614, and then 'Rinekullisky' in 1659, locally or Rinkoe, Rincolisky Harbour takes its name from the castle that overlooks it from a steep shoreline hillock. The name is derived from the Irish words Rinn chuil uisge which means 'the point with water at the rear'. This perfectly describes the stood back castle built on a steep hillock that descends steeply to the shores of the adjacent Roaring Water Bay.


Rincolisky Castle overlooking the harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Rincolisky Castle was built in 1495 by the powerful Gaelic O'Driscoll clan, discussed in the Baltimore Harbour Click to view haven entry, who held the power at that time around Baltimore and the islands. Sited on the narrows it seems Rincolisky was located to defend the area between Cullamore and the mainland. The topography would have also acted as a natural 'corral' for herds of cattle and the castle's commanding position would have enabled the O'Driscolls to then easily defend a large herd. It would have also been the principal stronghold of Collybeg, the area corresponding to the area north of the Ilen River.


Rincolisky Castle sited on the north side of the narrows
Image: Michael Harpur


Only the first two storeys of what was a five-storey tower survive and it would have originally looked more like Roaring Water Bay' Kilcoe Castle which it corresponds with. The 1450 Kilcoe Castle was a McCarthy stronghold, or clan-dermot. The role these opposing buildings played must surely have been just as much as symbols as their more utilitarian defence functions. In their day, the two tall opposing architectures of the two castles must have stood as icons to the clan's defiance against each other, and to all others represent the power and the impregnability of their holdings. Whatever the case both the clan's powers would both come to an abrupt end in the dawn of the 17th-century.


Rincolisky Castle on its hillock
Image: Mike Searle via CC BY SA 2.0


This happened when they had the misfortune of choosing the wrong side in the Munster wars during the reign of Tudor Queen Elizabeth I. After her forces decisively defeated the Irish and Spanish forces, at the Battle of Kinsale in 1601, the property of the O’Driscolls and McCarthys were both confiscated or taken in the case of Kilcoe. Rincolisky Castle was given to Sir Walter Copinger in 1602. Copinger then knocked the top three upper floors of the castle and built White Hall House from the material close to the castle and at the head of Rincolisky Harbour. The bottom two storeys of the castle were then left to ruin. At this time the area took on the name 'Whitehall' which was supposed to have been given to by one of the Audley family, some of whom were Earls of Castlehaven.


Boat dried out on the western shore of Rincolisky Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


In 1690 the Copinger’s suffered the same fate as the Gaelic clans when he supported James II and the family lost the area to Samuel Townsend. Smith writing his History of Cork in 1750, noted that the area 'was known as Whitehall, formerly called Rincolisky, a good house of Samuel Townshend, pleasantly situated on an arm of the sea'. The house was undoubtedly large, built with stones from the old castle. Later, c.1810, the family rebuilt the house as the Georgian mansion that is seen today overlooking the inlet. It is a fine house with beautiful grounds and private beaches. In 2000, the bottom two storeys of Rincolisky Castle were renovated and it is used today as a vacation rental property.


The south end of Rincolisky Harbour as seen from Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


With such excellent neighbouring anchorages, this is a settled weather berth on this lovely coast. It would be uncomfortable in any southwesterly gales that blow in from the Atlantic. But Rincolisky has the shelter of the islands, particularly Hare Island, which would make it a reasonable anchorage in anything but a hard southerly blow. Boats that can take to the bottom will find excellent shelter here.


What facilities are available?
Apart from the pier and the slip at Cunnamore there are no other facilities at Rincolisky Harbour.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to a vessel in Rincolisky Harbour.


With thanks to:
Diarmuid Minihane, Baltimore Harbour Master.







Rincolisky Castle overview


About Rincolisky Harbour

First recorded as 'Rinecoolecusky' in 1614, and then 'Rinekullisky' in 1659, locally or Rinkoe, Rincolisky Harbour takes its name from the castle that overlooks it from a steep shoreline hillock. The name is derived from the Irish words Rinn chuil uisge which means 'the point with water at the rear'. This perfectly describes the stood back castle built on a steep hillock that descends steeply to the shores of the adjacent Roaring Water Bay.


Rincolisky Castle overlooking the harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Rincolisky Castle was built in 1495 by the powerful Gaelic O'Driscoll clan, discussed in the Baltimore Harbour Click to view haven entry, who held the power at that time around Baltimore and the islands. Sited on the narrows it seems Rincolisky was located to defend the area between Cullamore and the mainland. The topography would have also acted as a natural 'corral' for herds of cattle and the castle's commanding position would have enabled the O'Driscolls to then easily defend a large herd. It would have also been the principal stronghold of Collybeg, the area corresponding to the area north of the Ilen River.


Rincolisky Castle sited on the north side of the narrows
Image: Michael Harpur


Only the first two storeys of what was a five-storey tower survive and it would have originally looked more like Roaring Water Bay' Kilcoe Castle which it corresponds with. The 1450 Kilcoe Castle was a McCarthy stronghold, or clan-dermot. The role these opposing buildings played must surely have been just as much as symbols as their more utilitarian defence functions. In their day, the two tall opposing architectures of the two castles must have stood as icons to the clan's defiance against each other, and to all others represent the power and the impregnability of their holdings. Whatever the case both the clan's powers would both come to an abrupt end in the dawn of the 17th-century.


Rincolisky Castle on its hillock
Image: Mike Searle via CC BY SA 2.0


This happened when they had the misfortune of choosing the wrong side in the Munster wars during the reign of Tudor Queen Elizabeth I. After her forces decisively defeated the Irish and Spanish forces, at the Battle of Kinsale in 1601, the property of the O’Driscolls and McCarthys were both confiscated or taken in the case of Kilcoe. Rincolisky Castle was given to Sir Walter Copinger in 1602. Copinger then knocked the top three upper floors of the castle and built White Hall House from the material close to the castle and at the head of Rincolisky Harbour. The bottom two storeys of the castle were then left to ruin. At this time the area took on the name 'Whitehall' which was supposed to have been given to by one of the Audley family, some of whom were Earls of Castlehaven.


Boat dried out on the western shore of Rincolisky Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


In 1690 the Copinger’s suffered the same fate as the Gaelic clans when he supported James II and the family lost the area to Samuel Townsend. Smith writing his History of Cork in 1750, noted that the area 'was known as Whitehall, formerly called Rincolisky, a good house of Samuel Townshend, pleasantly situated on an arm of the sea'. The house was undoubtedly large, built with stones from the old castle. Later, c.1810, the family rebuilt the house as the Georgian mansion that is seen today overlooking the inlet. It is a fine house with beautiful grounds and private beaches. In 2000, the bottom two storeys of Rincolisky Castle were renovated and it is used today as a vacation rental property.


The south end of Rincolisky Harbour as seen from Cunnamore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


With such excellent neighbouring anchorages, this is a settled weather berth on this lovely coast. It would be uncomfortable in any southwesterly gales that blow in from the Atlantic. But Rincolisky has the shelter of the islands, particularly Hare Island, which would make it a reasonable anchorage in anything but a hard southerly blow. Boats that can take to the bottom will find excellent shelter here.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
East Pier - 0.2 miles SE
Trá Bán - 0.3 miles S
Calf Island East - 1.5 miles WSW
Horse Island - 1.3 miles WNW
Rossbrin Cove - 1.3 miles NW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Turk Head - 0.5 miles SE
Reena Dhuna - 1.5 miles ENE
Oldcourt - 2.7 miles ENE
Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE
Quarantine Island - 0.6 miles ESE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Rincolisky Harbour.






































Rincolisky Castle overview



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