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Heir Island (East Pier)

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Overview





Located in the centre of Roaringwater Bay, on Ireland’s southwest coast in Co. Cork, Heir Island is immediately northwest of Sherkin Island and southwest of the mainland. The smallest of the three inhabited islands in the bay area it is a secluded anchorage close to its primary pier.

Located in the centre of Roaringwater Bay, on Ireland’s southwest coast in Co. Cork, Heir Island is immediately northwest of Sherkin Island and southwest of the mainland. The smallest of the three inhabited islands in the bay area it is a secluded anchorage close to its primary pier.

Set behind islands and the mainland, with rocky shoals breaking any seaway, the east pier anchorage offers good protection from all but very strong southerly winds. Approaches to the general area, from the north end of Baltimore Harbour or directly from Long Island Bay, are unmarked, intricate and challenging. All of this requires careful navigation in settled conditions with good visibility.



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Keyfacts for Heir Island (East Pier)



Last modified
May 9th 2018

Summary

A good location with careful navigation required for access.

Facilities
Mini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableHot food available in the localityMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationBicycle hire available in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 29.980' N, 009° 25.205' W

This is 300 metres east of the modern pier set on the extreme east point of the island.

What are the initial fixes?

The following waypoints will set up a final approach:

(i) Baltimore Harbour initial fix

51° 28.120' N, 009° 23.423' W

This is quarter of a mile due south of the entrance, midway between Beacon & Barrack Point in the white sector of the lighthouse.

(ii) Baltimore north entrance initial fix

51° 28.080' N, 009° 27.450' W

This is set on the clearing line of bearing 230°T of Clare Island's Doonanore Castle ruins open east of Illauneana, as best seen on Admiralty 2129, and about midway between the Toorane Rocks and Carrigmore.
Please note

Initial fixes only set up their listed targets. Do not plan to sail directly between initial fixes as a routing sequence.




What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Heir Island (East Pier) for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Heir Island (east beach) - 0.2 miles SW
  2. Rincolisky Harbour - 0.2 miles NW
  3. Turk’s Head - 0.3 miles SE
  4. Quarantine Island - 0.4 miles ESE
  5. Kinish Harbour - 0.9 miles S
  6. Off Castle Ruins - 0.9 miles SSE
  7. Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE
  8. Horseshoe Harbour - 1.1 miles SSE
  9. Baltimore - 1.2 miles ESE
  10. Horse Island - 1.4 miles WNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Heir Island (east beach) - 0.2 miles SW
  2. Rincolisky Harbour - 0.2 miles NW
  3. Turk’s Head - 0.3 miles SE
  4. Quarantine Island - 0.4 miles ESE
  5. Kinish Harbour - 0.9 miles S
  6. Off Castle Ruins - 0.9 miles SSE
  7. Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE
  8. Horseshoe Harbour - 1.1 miles SSE
  9. Baltimore - 1.2 miles ESE
  10. Horse Island - 1.4 miles WNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?


Vessels approaching this Haven may use the Oldcourt Click to view haven general approach directions as the anchorage lies off its approach path.

A useful waypoint that can be targeted is at the mouth of the River Ilen. This is set at the northern edge of the river fairway about 250 metres northwest of Two Woman’s Rock and opposite Heir Island's eastern beach.

Waypoint River Ilen Entrance – waypoint: 51° 29.710' N, 009° 25.120' W



From the waypoint steer north first to clear a shallow area with 1.5 metres over it extending from Two Woman’s Rock. Once clear of this steer about 340° for 700 metres to Rincolisky Harbour. Prefer the mainland side of this body of water where the best water will be found keeping about 100 metres off the eastern shoreline.

Haven locationThe modern East Pier of Heir Island will be seen at the island’s extreme east point. Once abreast of the pier drop anchor about 300 metres out and in the mainland side of the fairway where excellent holding will be found in mud. The best water, about 2.5 metres, is found off the mainland side but shallower draft vessels will find up to a metre closer into the Heir Island pier. Land at the pier which along with Cunnamore pier on the opposite mainland, was recently constructed in 2000. Steps cut into the solid rock on Heir island are the remains of the old landing pier.


Why visit here?
Heir Island, in Irish Inishodriscol or Inis an Oidhre derived from Inis Uí Drisceoil meaning "Ó Driscol's island". The island often goes by the name “Hare Island’’ which was an accidental misspelling of “Hare” by the English that dates as far back as at least 1694. The Irish name reflects upon the powerful 15th Century Gaelic O'Driscoll clan’s dominance of the area discussed in the Baltimore Harbour Click to view haven entry. It is widely believed that they had a castle on the islands most westerly point called An Dún, now called ‘the Doon’.

The low-lying somewhat ‘T’ shaped island is only 2.5 km (1.5 km2) long and 1.5 km wide and encompasses 360 acres of fertile land. Yet it is the largest island in central Roaringwater Bay and the fourth largest of Carbery's Hundred Isles - after Sherkin, Clear and Long Island. Situated less than 400 metres from Cunnamore Pier on the mainland it is both one of the most accessible and sheltered of Carbery’s Hundred Isles. The main access point is Heir Island pier, that is located on the islands extreme east point and close south of Cunnamore Pier. The main residential area, however, is on the opposite side of the island. This is known as Paris and it is situated on the northern side of the island‘s western reach. In bygone years fish were salted here and the hamlet developed around it. Paris is much noted for its quaint bridge that is only wide enough for a single car to pass. The centre of the island has an extensive marsh, with a vibrant reed bed, and the islands remaining houses are sparsely dotted around the island.

In the past, the island had a permanent population of 400 people who either fished or farmed the land. The island was badly affected by the famine which to this day is remembered by an annual mass held in memory of the Island’s children that either starved or died of famine-related diseases. Yet it was to be the latter half of the 20th century that stripped the island of most of its population. Then it was found to be too hard to make an adequate living by modern standards and many of the young emigrated to England, USA and Australia for a better life. There are many families that have a long island lineage, but a good proportion of the island’s 45 houses were sold in the 1960s. These have been restored as holiday homes today but a host of abandoned ruins speak of past times when the island was home to a great deal more. As a result of the emigration, Heir island is the least populated of the three main islands off Baltimore. It now has a year-round population of around 25-30 that swells five-fold in the peak summer season.

Heir Island’s unique range of eco-systems; coastal beaches, cliffs, forest, marsh and heathland, with the added Gulf Stream effect keeping temperatures reasonably consistent throughout the year, create a unique environment for flora and fauna. It is home to many unusual birds as well as over two hundred species of wildflowers. There are many wildlife reserves here with the most notable being the Sandy Beach or Trá Bán, a sandy stretch that faces Baltimore. Situated on the east side of the island it is often used as a landing point for leisure craft during the summer months.

Flanked on three sides by Carbery's Hundred Isles, with views of Mount Gabriel near Schull to the north, and with a 'capital' called ‘Paris’, it is unsurprising that the island is home to many well-known artists. They are drawn to the island’s breathtaking landscape and peaceful atmosphere and show their work in several island galleries.

Heir Island is a place where one can feel furthest from the pressures of everyday life. The island is small enough to be easily explored by foot or on a bicycle, and those who stop by should try and eat at the islands very famous restaurant. Noted for its fresh catch-of-the-day served alongside local island produce, it is said to be superb. Food lovers travel from far and wide for a table but the waiting list is reported to be legendary.


What facilities are available?
The island has two piers, and a shop whose location is in the main hamlet on the west side of the island. where fresh bread made on the island is also available. Although the small island does not have a pub, it has holiday rentals, an art gallery, a sailing school, an outdoor activities camp, a permanent restaurant and an occasional restaurant located in the Sailing School. The permanent island restaurant is reputed to be very good and is by reservation only.

Heir Island is accessible by boat all year round by ferry. The main way to get to the island is via the island ferry that departs from Cunnamore point to the island's main pier 6 times a day, every 2 hours, from 8am to 6pm during the summer. Another ferry services Heir and Sherkin islands from Baltimore & Cunnamore throughout the Summer months of July and August.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to a boat anchored off Heir Island.


With thanks to:
Diarmuid Minihane, Baltimore Harbour Master. Photographs: Burke Corbett and A McCarron.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fixes' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.








About Heir Island (East Pier)

Heir Island, in Irish Inishodriscol or Inis an Oidhre derived from Inis Uí Drisceoil meaning "Ó Driscol's island". The island often goes by the name “Hare Island’’ which was an accidental misspelling of “Hare” by the English that dates as far back as at least 1694. The Irish name reflects upon the powerful 15th Century Gaelic O'Driscoll clan’s dominance of the area discussed in the Baltimore Harbour Click to view haven entry. It is widely believed that they had a castle on the islands most westerly point called An Dún, now called ‘the Doon’.

The low-lying somewhat ‘T’ shaped island is only 2.5 km (1.5 km2) long and 1.5 km wide and encompasses 360 acres of fertile land. Yet it is the largest island in central Roaringwater Bay and the fourth largest of Carbery's Hundred Isles - after Sherkin, Clear and Long Island. Situated less than 400 metres from Cunnamore Pier on the mainland it is both one of the most accessible and sheltered of Carbery’s Hundred Isles. The main access point is Heir Island pier, that is located on the islands extreme east point and close south of Cunnamore Pier. The main residential area, however, is on the opposite side of the island. This is known as Paris and it is situated on the northern side of the island‘s western reach. In bygone years fish were salted here and the hamlet developed around it. Paris is much noted for its quaint bridge that is only wide enough for a single car to pass. The centre of the island has an extensive marsh, with a vibrant reed bed, and the islands remaining houses are sparsely dotted around the island.

In the past, the island had a permanent population of 400 people who either fished or farmed the land. The island was badly affected by the famine which to this day is remembered by an annual mass held in memory of the Island’s children that either starved or died of famine-related diseases. Yet it was to be the latter half of the 20th century that stripped the island of most of its population. Then it was found to be too hard to make an adequate living by modern standards and many of the young emigrated to England, USA and Australia for a better life. There are many families that have a long island lineage, but a good proportion of the island’s 45 houses were sold in the 1960s. These have been restored as holiday homes today but a host of abandoned ruins speak of past times when the island was home to a great deal more. As a result of the emigration, Heir island is the least populated of the three main islands off Baltimore. It now has a year-round population of around 25-30 that swells five-fold in the peak summer season.

Heir Island’s unique range of eco-systems; coastal beaches, cliffs, forest, marsh and heathland, with the added Gulf Stream effect keeping temperatures reasonably consistent throughout the year, create a unique environment for flora and fauna. It is home to many unusual birds as well as over two hundred species of wildflowers. There are many wildlife reserves here with the most notable being the Sandy Beach or Trá Bán, a sandy stretch that faces Baltimore. Situated on the east side of the island it is often used as a landing point for leisure craft during the summer months.

Flanked on three sides by Carbery's Hundred Isles, with views of Mount Gabriel near Schull to the north, and with a 'capital' called ‘Paris’, it is unsurprising that the island is home to many well-known artists. They are drawn to the island’s breathtaking landscape and peaceful atmosphere and show their work in several island galleries.

Heir Island is a place where one can feel furthest from the pressures of everyday life. The island is small enough to be easily explored by foot or on a bicycle, and those who stop by should try and eat at the islands very famous restaurant. Noted for its fresh catch-of-the-day served alongside local island produce, it is said to be superb. Food lovers travel from far and wide for a table but the waiting list is reported to be legendary.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Heir Island (east beach) - 0.2 miles SW
White Strand - 1.6 miles WSW
Horse Island - 1.4 miles WNW
Rossbrin Cove - 1.5 miles NW
Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.9 miles WNW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Rincolisky Harbour - 0.2 miles NW
Turk’s Head - 0.3 miles SE
Reena Dhuna - 1.5 miles NE
Oldcourt - 2.6 miles ENE
Inane Creek - 1.1 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Heir Island (East Pier).









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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.