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Long Island

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Overview





Located in Co. Cork on Ireland’s southwest coast, Long Island is situated at the head of Long Island Bay, close south of the mainland and immediately outside of the entrance to Schull Harbour. The island’s anchorage lies off a remote island pier within Long Island Channel that is situated between the island and the mainland.

Located in Co. Cork on Ireland’s southwest coast, Long Island is situated at the head of Long Island Bay, close south of the mainland and immediately outside of the entrance to Schull Harbour. The island’s anchorage lies off a remote island pier within Long Island Channel that is situated between the island and the mainland.

Set within an enclosed channel the anchorage offers good protection from all but very strong westerly or north-easterly winds. Approaches to the general area are straightforward and are marked and lit for an east end approach to the channel.



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Keyfacts for Long Island



Last modified
May 9th 2018

Summary

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Marked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 30.052' N, 009° 33.434' W

Just off the harbour wall on Long Island

What are the initial fixes?

The following waypoints will set up a final approach:

(i) Schull initial fix

51° 29.947' N, 009° 31.682' W

This is 300 metres west of the Amelia Rock Marker and on the harbour’s 346° T in-line leading through the entrance. The anchoring area in Schull Harbour is mile a half from here.

(ii) Goat Island Little initial fix

51° 28.655' N, 009° 36.140' W

This is half a mile south of the southern extremity of Little Goat Island where a 4.9 metre high stone beacon will be seen. An approach to Long Island Channel via the west side of Goat Island, through the 'Man of War Sound', or on its eastern side, via 'Goat Island Sound', may be made from here.
Please note

Initial fixes only set up their listed targets. Do not plan to sail directly between initial fixes as a routing sequence.




What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Long Island for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Colla Harbour - 0.2 miles NNW
  2. Coney Island - 0.3 miles W
  3. Croagh Bay (Long Island Sound) - 0.6 miles W
  4. Schull Harbour (Skull) - 1 miles NNE
  5. Castle Island (South Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
  6. Castle Island (North Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
  7. Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.6 miles ENE
  8. White Strand - 1.8 miles ESE
  9. Horse Island - 2 miles ENE
  10. Toormore Cove - 2.2 miles WNW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Colla Harbour - 0.2 miles NNW
  2. Coney Island - 0.3 miles W
  3. Croagh Bay (Long Island Sound) - 0.6 miles W
  4. Schull Harbour (Skull) - 1 miles NNE
  5. Castle Island (South Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
  6. Castle Island (North Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
  7. Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.6 miles ENE
  8. White Strand - 1.8 miles ESE
  9. Horse Island - 2 miles ENE
  10. Toormore Cove - 2.2 miles WNW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?


Long Island is located off the north shore of Long Island Bay, immediately outside and west of the entrance to the famous Schull Harbour Click to view haven . Schull Harbour lies at the foot of the areas highest ground Mount Gabriel made further conspicuous by radar domes near the summit. This makes the area readily identifiable throughout the bay.

The island is two miles long and about 500 yards wide. It rises near the middle to a modest 29 metres from where it declines to the low shelving point at its northeastern end. This is called Copper Point where a light is shown from a white 14 metre high round tower. The outer shores of Long Island are generally clear to the distance of 90 metres, except near the eastern end, within 0.8 miles of Copper Point, where the always visible Carrigeenwaun Rocks extend off 200 metres.

On the north side of the island, between Long Island and the mainland, is Long Island Channel. It is about 600 metres in width, with good holding ground and plenty of water. It provides good shelter to several anchorages.

Southern Approach Vessels approaching from the south, or east, may use the Schull Harbour Click to view haven general approach directions and initial fix.



Initial fix location From the Schull Initial fix, proceed a third to the east of Long Island, between it and the Castle Island, called Castle Island Grounds. Long Island’s Copper Point will be conspicuous with a light showing from a white 14 metre high round tower.

Copper Point - Lighthouse Q(3)10s 16m 8M position 51° 30.250’N 009° 32.063’W



Enter the half a mile wide Long Island Channel between Copper Point and Skull Point. The eastern end of Long Island Channel is obstructed by a shoal bank that fringes the north side of Long Island.

The principal danger is the Cush Spit, a gravel bank about half a mile to the west of Copper Point. The spit stretches about 400 metres out from the island, nearly halfway across to the mainland, and has 0.6 metres of water on its north edge, that is steep-to and is marked by a north cardinal buoy. To the east and west of the Cush Spit the depths decrease but there is plenty of water for the cruising vessel.

Cush Spit - north cardinal Q 4M position 51° 30.304’N 009° 33.017’W

Western Approach Vessels approaching from the west may use several of the approaches to the Long Island Channel.



(i) Through a narrow channel called Barrel Sound, with depths of 9.1 to 24 metres with a shallower mid-channel section carrying 4.6 metres over a rock, that leads between Castle Point and Duharrig Islet. The 5.2-metre high islet of Duharrig lies 0.4 mile southwest of Castle Point on the mainland.

(ii) Between Goat Island and Illaunricmonia Island, called Man of War Sound, that joins Lough Buidhe to the north of Goat Island. The channel is made readily identifiable by the unlit beacon on the southern tip of Little Goat Island to the east of it.

(iii) Between Goat Island and Long Island, called Goat Island Sound, which has Goat Island protruding into it from the west and the drying Sound Rock from the east, in the path of vessels cutting corners. But a midway path presents no dangers and the Little Goat Island beacon to the west of it is a reliable marker.

Any of these approaches can be used to approach Long Island Channel. Man of War Sound and Goat Island Sound being the easier of the three. Of these Man of War Sound has less dangers in the margins but Goat Island Sound has more regular soundings and smoother waters in any seaway. The initial fix is set south of the Little Goat Island beacon so either path may be adopted.
Please note

It would be a best practice for first-time visitors to these sounds to operate under power.




Initial fix location Vessels approaching from the west will see Goat Island to the east of Illaunricmonia Island, which has rocky shores and rises to a height of 32 metres, and which has a channel into Long Island Sound on each side of it.

The island is made remarkable by a deep chasm, which almost severs its southern portion, called Little Goat Island. On a hill near the seaward southern extremity of Little Goat Island, a 4.9 metre high stone beacon will be seen. This helps distinguish the island and entrances to Long Island Sound that opens up Long Island Bay.

Although only 400 metres wide at its northern end, where it is at its narrowest, Goat Island Sound has plenty of water with at least a depth of 20.7 metres. Foul ground extends over 400 metres south of the eastern extremity of Goat Island. On the opposite side, off the southwest end of Long Island, and at the north end of Goat Island Sound where the sound is at its narrowest, there are some off-lying rocks and islets. These are the Garillaun Islands and close west to these is the straggling Sound Rock that dries to 1.5 metres very much in the way of a vessel cutting in and out of Goat Island Sound and Long Island Channel.



Exiting Goat Island Sound turn west between Gun Point and Garillaun Islands, where it leads between Long Island and mainland up to the 11.9 metres high Coney Island. Between Gun Point and Coney Island, there is a shallow inlet running up to Croagh River, with some detached rocks extending west and 80 metres to the south of the Coney Island.



From this point onward it is simply a matter of following the Long Island Channel up to the pier where ample water will be found and no off-lying dangers.


Haven location Anchor off Long Island drying pier situated northeast of the highpoint of the island. The island pier and adjacent beach will be readily apparent on approach. Land at the pier or beach.




Why visit here?
Long Island is a direct translation of the islands historic Irish title Inishfada. Presenting a long narrow shape, 4.8 km long and only 0.8 km wide, the origin of its name is readily evident.

Though difficult to imagine, in the 1840's Long Island boasted a buoyant population of over 300 inhabitants. A trip along the island‘s short run of a surfaced road, plus a further overgrown section extending to an old copper mine, bears evidence of ruined cottages and stone-works to its lost population. Today it is one of the few of Carbery's Hundred Isles that remains inhabited. However, it only has a permanent population of about 10 people who live in the island's houses that were constructed in the early 1900's and which have been entirely restored and now have running water. For the few remaining islanders farming is the only economic activity available and their cattle fare well on this verdant island. In more leisurely days cattle were 'swam' across Long Island Channel but are now towed across off the stern of a boat. The short passage from the mainland‘s Colla Pier to the beach inside Long Island’s pier is about 600 metres and the main area of habitation is situated just above.

The island is a pleasure to explore offering some fine walks, shingle beaches, and wild flora and fauna. It is waisted north to south and on both sides of the waists are fine beaches. These make attractive camping sites for those who want to come ashore and spend a night. The one on the south side is less obvious as it is in a hidden and sheltered cove. Just further west of the waist on the sheltered north side is the wildest camping site in a cove near the western tip of the island. The island's most distinctive landmark is located on its eastern end at Copper Point. Here a white tower Lighthouse, complete with its landing steps, serves to mark the entrance channel to Schull Harbour that is only 10 minutes away. The 16-metre high structure was first erected in 1864 where it served as an unlit beacon for 113 years until in 1977 its light was established.

From a boating perspective, the berth is off the island‘s main pier provides a truly lovely Long Island Channel anchorage. The location offers a wonderful sense of isolation from modern life where it is possible to kick back to enjoy some beautiful nature and scenery. Yet it has quick and easy access to Schull which is just 15 minutes away. This makes it a very good night time alternative to Schull Harbour. From here a vessel can benefit from the access to the seasonal buzz and pace of the holiday town, but likewise escape all the disturbance of vessels entering and exiting during the night, making it a beautiful place to awake in the morning after a quiet nights sleep.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities at this remote island anchorage.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to vessel anchored off Long Island.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photography with thanks to Emma Cooney and Burke Corbett.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fixes' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.











About Long Island

Long Island is a direct translation of the islands historic Irish title Inishfada. Presenting a long narrow shape, 4.8 km long and only 0.8 km wide, the origin of its name is readily evident.

Though difficult to imagine, in the 1840's Long Island boasted a buoyant population of over 300 inhabitants. A trip along the island‘s short run of a surfaced road, plus a further overgrown section extending to an old copper mine, bears evidence of ruined cottages and stone-works to its lost population. Today it is one of the few of Carbery's Hundred Isles that remains inhabited. However, it only has a permanent population of about 10 people who live in the island's houses that were constructed in the early 1900's and which have been entirely restored and now have running water. For the few remaining islanders farming is the only economic activity available and their cattle fare well on this verdant island. In more leisurely days cattle were 'swam' across Long Island Channel but are now towed across off the stern of a boat. The short passage from the mainland‘s Colla Pier to the beach inside Long Island’s pier is about 600 metres and the main area of habitation is situated just above.

The island is a pleasure to explore offering some fine walks, shingle beaches, and wild flora and fauna. It is waisted north to south and on both sides of the waists are fine beaches. These make attractive camping sites for those who want to come ashore and spend a night. The one on the south side is less obvious as it is in a hidden and sheltered cove. Just further west of the waist on the sheltered north side is the wildest camping site in a cove near the western tip of the island. The island's most distinctive landmark is located on its eastern end at Copper Point. Here a white tower Lighthouse, complete with its landing steps, serves to mark the entrance channel to Schull Harbour that is only 10 minutes away. The 16-metre high structure was first erected in 1864 where it served as an unlit beacon for 113 years until in 1977 its light was established.

From a boating perspective, the berth is off the island‘s main pier provides a truly lovely Long Island Channel anchorage. The location offers a wonderful sense of isolation from modern life where it is possible to kick back to enjoy some beautiful nature and scenery. Yet it has quick and easy access to Schull which is just 15 minutes away. This makes it a very good night time alternative to Schull Harbour. From here a vessel can benefit from the access to the seasonal buzz and pace of the holiday town, but likewise escape all the disturbance of vessels entering and exiting during the night, making it a beautiful place to awake in the morning after a quiet nights sleep.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Colla Harbour - 0.2 miles NNW
Coney Island - 0.3 miles W
Croagh Bay (Long Island Sound) - 0.6 miles W
Toormore Cove - 2.2 miles WNW
Carrigmore Bay - 2.3 miles W
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Schull Harbour (Skull) - 1 miles NNE
Castle Island (North Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
Castle Island (South Side) - 1.4 miles ENE
Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.6 miles ENE
Rossbrin Cove - 2.2 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Long Island.





















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