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White Strand

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Overview





Located on Ireland’s southwest coast in Co. Cork, Calf Island East is the easternmost of a group of three islands that occupy a central position within Roaringwater Bay. White Strand is the uninhabited island’s best anchorage and landing position.

Located on Ireland’s southwest coast in Co. Cork, Calf Island East is the easternmost of a group of three islands that occupy a central position within Roaringwater Bay. White Strand is the uninhabited island’s best anchorage and landing position.

Set into a cutting between reefs and islets off the northeast facing shoreline it is an exposed anchorage that provides a measure of protection from westerly component conditions but little in the way of air protection. Access requires attentive navigation with excellent visibility as this location is all about eyeball navigation.
Please note

Do not be attracted into approaching the anchorage from the north. Although the strand can be clearly seen from this direction around the small islet, it cannot be approached by this path as this area is foul.




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Keyfacts for White Strand



Last modified
May 9th 2018

Summary

An exposed location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Marked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 29.088' N, 009° 28.965' W

Tucked into the east side of the island, immediately southeast of an off lying islet situated close east of Calf Island East

What is the initial fix?

The following White Strand initial fix will set up a final approach:
51° 29.240' N, 009° 28.590' W
The line of bearing of 336° T of the significant cleft on the east side of Mount Gabriel, called Barnacleeve Gap, open west of two roofless grey houses plus a small thicket of trees set upon the eastern point of Castle Island. The beach is 500 metres in a west by southwest direction from here.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to White Strand for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Castle Island (South Side) - 1 miles NNW
  2. Castle Island (North Side) - 1.1 miles NNW
  3. Horse Island - 1.2 miles N
  4. Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.4 miles NNW
  5. Heir Island (east beach) - 1.4 miles ENE
  6. Rossbrin Cove - 1.5 miles NNE
  7. Rincolisky Harbour - 1.5 miles ENE
  8. Heir Island (East Pier) - 1.6 miles ENE
  9. Kinish Harbour - 1.6 miles E
  10. Turk’s Head - 1.7 miles ENE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Rossbrin Cove - 1.5 miles NNE
  2. Rincolisky Harbour - 1.5 miles ENE
  3. Heir Island (East Pier) - 1.6 miles ENE
  4. Kinish Harbour - 1.6 miles E
  5. Turk’s Head - 1.7 miles ENE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?
The line of bearing of 336° T, as best seen on Admiralty 2129, aligning the significant cleft on the east side of Mount Gabriel, called Barnacleeve Gap, open west of two roofless grey houses plus a small thicket of trees set upon the eastern point of Castle Island, serves as an excellent safe water sight line for approaches to this Haven. It offers a safe water transit for vessels passing to the east of Calf Island East and the west of the drying Anima Rock. Anima Rock lies half a mile to the northeast of Calf Island East and dries to 0.1 metres with 3.7 metres of water on its outer end. The initial fix is set upon this sight line, at the midpoint between Anima Rock and White Strand Bay, so that it provides a convergence point for both southern and northern approaches.

Southern Approach Vessels approaching from the south may use the line of bearing to pass to the southwest of the outer dangers of the Toorane Rocks, and then midway between Calf Island East and the drying Anima Rock for the final approach.



Northern Approach Vessels approaching from the north may use the line of bearing to pass clear of the Carthy's Islands and its rocky outliers that are situated to the southwest.



Vessels approaching between Carthy's Islands and the Calf Island Group should not be tempted to go directly to White Strand upon rounding the northeast corner of Calf Island East. Although the strand can be seen, around its small islet the northwest corner is foul out to 300 metres and the area between the islet and the shore dries.



Initial fix location From the initial fix the beach is 500 metres in a west by southwest direction. The anchorage needs to be picked out by eyeball navigation. Looking directly ahead from this approach White Strand beach should be readily apparent with the roof of the holiday house at the southern side of the island showing over the back of the sand dunes behind it.

The anchorage is tucked in between a small islet on the northern side and reefs that extend from the islet to the northeast. The southern side is fringed by a reef that extends from the shore and these are exposed at low water. Track in the middle of the gap keeping about 60 metres off the islet that is always visible.



Haven location Anchor about half way along and abreast of the outer islet at about a distance of 100 metres offshore. The anchoring area is about 150 metres wide with excellent fine sand holding. 5 metres of water will be found at half-tide, and at low water expect at least 2.5 metres in this area. The depths then gradually shelve up to the beach. Land on the beach by tender.




Why visit here?
The Calf Islands, in Irish Na Laonna, are a chain of three low-lying islands, West, Middle and East Calf that occupy the most central position of Roaringwater Bay. From high ground especially on a sunny day from Cape Clear, the Islands are quite striking appearing as three dark patches in an otherwise deep blue sea.

All of the islands are low, West Calf rises to 22 metres, Middle Calf to just 11 metres, and East Calf to 19 metres, exposed and treeless. Nevertheless, all were historically settled. East Calf had a population of about twenty in the 19th Century and remained occupied up until the 1940s. Today all three islands are uninhabited although cattle are brought out to graze amongst the ruins of the former farms. Apart from these, hares are the only other animals to be seen on all three islands.

The small 77 acres Calf Island East is the most attractive of the three islands. It has shingle strands all round save for the anchoring location at White Strand where there are many attractive little sandy beaches backed by dunes. All the Calf islands have classic seaside flora, including Yellow-horned Poppy, Sea Spurge, Sea Kale and Sea-holly but East Calf has a more diverse habitat. Having a small brackish lough surrounded by marshy ground, grassland over-blown by sand plus heathland on higher ground, it has a much wider range of plants than its neighbouring islands. A holiday house will be found by the deep cut into its south side.

A remote island, Calf Island East is a nice lunchtime spot and a great place to let the kids loose on the lovely sandy beach or to explore the island. Although uninhabited many people come out to White Strand for the day, and the holiday home is regularly let during the summer. Likewise, people do camp overnight so you may have the company of fellow explorers in this very remote outpost of Roaringwater Bay.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities at this remote island anchorage.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to vessel anchored of this remote island.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photography with thanks to Dr Bryan Lynch and Burke Corbett.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.














About White Strand

The Calf Islands, in Irish Na Laonna, are a chain of three low-lying islands, West, Middle and East Calf that occupy the most central position of Roaringwater Bay. From high ground especially on a sunny day from Cape Clear, the Islands are quite striking appearing as three dark patches in an otherwise deep blue sea.

All of the islands are low, West Calf rises to 22 metres, Middle Calf to just 11 metres, and East Calf to 19 metres, exposed and treeless. Nevertheless, all were historically settled. East Calf had a population of about twenty in the 19th Century and remained occupied up until the 1940s. Today all three islands are uninhabited although cattle are brought out to graze amongst the ruins of the former farms. Apart from these, hares are the only other animals to be seen on all three islands.

The small 77 acres Calf Island East is the most attractive of the three islands. It has shingle strands all round save for the anchoring location at White Strand where there are many attractive little sandy beaches backed by dunes. All the Calf islands have classic seaside flora, including Yellow-horned Poppy, Sea Spurge, Sea Kale and Sea-holly but East Calf has a more diverse habitat. Having a small brackish lough surrounded by marshy ground, grassland over-blown by sand plus heathland on higher ground, it has a much wider range of plants than its neighbouring islands. A holiday house will be found by the deep cut into its south side.

A remote island, Calf Island East is a nice lunchtime spot and a great place to let the kids loose on the lovely sandy beach or to explore the island. Although uninhabited many people come out to White Strand for the day, and the holiday home is regularly let during the summer. Likewise, people do camp overnight so you may have the company of fellow explorers in this very remote outpost of Roaringwater Bay.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Horse Island - 1.2 miles N
Rossbrin Cove - 1.5 miles NNE
Trawnwaud (Castle Island Sound) - 1.4 miles NNW
Castle Island (South Side) - 1 miles NNW
Castle Island (North Side) - 1.1 miles NNW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Heir Island (east beach) - 1.4 miles ENE
Heir Island (East Pier) - 1.6 miles ENE
Rincolisky Harbour - 1.5 miles ENE
Turk’s Head - 1.7 miles ENE
Reena Dhuna - 3 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for White Strand.

















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