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Rosslare Bay (or South Bay)

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Overview





Rosslare South Bay is situated immediately to the north of Rosslare Europort on Ireland's southeast corner. It is a large bay fronting a popular beach and tourist village where it is possible to anchor or pick up moorings.

Rosslare South Bay is situated immediately to the north of Rosslare Europort on Ireland's southeast corner. It is a large bay fronting a popular beach and tourist village where it is possible to anchor or pick up moorings.

The well-protected bay provides a good anchorage except in winds from the north round by east to southeast. That said, the offshore series of sand-banks provide it with a measure of protection to its exposed quarters. The land, however, is low here and provides little or no air protection in strong winds. Safe access, night or day at any stage of the tides is provided by Rosslare Europort's shipping channels.



2 comments
Keyfacts for Rosslare Bay (or South Bay)



Last modified
June 5th 2020

Summary

A good location with safe access.

Facilities
Top up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaCar hire available in the areaShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 15.243' N, 006° 21.072' W

This is the position where best protection will be found during a southerly swell.

What is the initial fix?

The following Rosslare Harbour initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 14.751' N, 006° 15.626' W
This waypoint is 200 metres south of the North Long VQ(6)+L Fl.10s.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are southbound vessels are available in eastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Dublin Bay to Rosslare Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Use the directions for Rosslare Europort Click to view haven for an Irish Sea approach.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Rosslare Bay (or South Bay) for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Rosslare Europort (Rosslare Harbour) - 0.3 miles E
  2. Ballytrent - 1.5 miles SSE
  3. Carne - 2 miles S
  4. Wexford Harbour - 4 miles NW
  5. Kilmore Quay - 6.2 miles WSW
  6. Little Saltee (landing beach) - 6.8 miles SW
  7. Little Saltee (east side) - 6.8 miles SW
  8. Little Saltee (west side) - 7 miles SW
  9. Great Saltee (landing beach) - 7.7 miles SW
  10. Gilert Bay - 7.9 miles SW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Rosslare Europort (Rosslare Harbour) - 0.3 miles E
  2. Ballytrent - 1.5 miles SSE
  3. Carne - 2 miles S
  4. Wexford Harbour - 4 miles NW
  5. Kilmore Quay - 6.2 miles WSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



What's the story here?
Rosslare Strand overlooking Rosslare Bay
Image: Michael Harpur


Rosslare Bay, also known as South Bay and the village Rosslare Strand or simply Rosslare, is an open bay with a village and seaside resort at its head. The long arc of sand it presents is a Blue Flag beach that has been attracting swimmers and families for well over a century and the village has several hotels, cafes and restaurants catering to visitors.


The small boat harbour to the west of Rosslare Europort
Image: Michael Harpur


The bay provides a good anchorage in all westerly component winds but is unusable in onshore winds. It is entirely open to easterly component winds although the sea is somewhat broken by the off-lying banks. Best-protected with any southerly swell is anchored off the small boat harbour in the south end of the bay.


Rosslare Strand
Image: Michael Harpur


For those more interested in the beach there is an attractive anchorage immediately offshore when there is little southerly swell. 3 yellow visitors moorings (€10.00) with a minimum depth of 3 metres are laid of the village during the season.


How to get in?
The north end of Rosslare Bay tapering off to Rosslare Point
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Dublin Bay to Rosslare Harbour Route location. The Long Bank and Holdens Bed on the outside, or eastern side of the bay, means that an Irish Sea approach is best taken via the deep ad marked channel for Rosslare Europort Click to view haven. Be watchful for Rosslare Europort's commercial traffic and also the channels strong cross currents.


Rosslare Bay as seen from its north end
Image: Michael Harpur


Rosslare Bay lies between Greenore Point and Rosslare Point about 5 miles north-northwestward. The shores of Rosslare Bay are cliffy out to about 2 miles northwestward of Rosslare Europort from which they then gradually slope down to a strip of sandhills that tapering down to Rosslare Point that forms the easter side of Wexford Harbour. Rosslare Bay is shallow near to the shore, with 5 metres of water at 1 mile's distance off and out in the North Sheer, close to the banks, 12 to 13 metres will be found.

Rosslare Europort with the small boat harbour seen further along the shore
Image: Michael Harpur


Vessels approaching from the south and east can come in via the Rosslare Europort channel and then pass to the north of the Rosslare Europort continue westward for about a ⅓ of a mile to the area off of the Small Boat Harbour. There is ample water all the way with the 2-metre contour lying about 150 metres offshore.


Rosslare Strand with its conspicuous lifeguard lookout as seen from Rosslare
Europort

Image: Michael Harpur


Alternately, those that are intent upon anchoring off the beach can lay off a course for the lifeguard lookout station that is located on the beach and central to Rosslare Village.


Rosslare Small Boat Harbour, also known as Kilrane Harbour, at low water
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Anchor in sand and mud according to draft off the small boat harbour. The 2-metre LAT tide contour lies about 60 metres off the head of the pier.

The slip and jetty within Rosslare Small Boat Harbour at low water
Image: Michael Harpur


Land by tender on the beach or on the slip and jetty in Rosslare Small Boat Harbour. Tenders must not be left alongside the jetty as it impedes the local fishing boats. It is essential to pull the boat clear of the jetty up the adjacent beach and well clear of the root of the jetty where fishermen load and unload catch and gear.


Pull the tender clear of the jetty after landing
Image: Michael Harpur


This is Rosslare Bay's best-protected anchoring location when there is any southerly swell. Also known as Kilrane Harbour the small drying harbour is used by local boat owners and inshore fishermen.


The anchoring area off the beach
Image: Michael Harpur


The anchorage off the beach is attractive when there is little southerly swell. Once east of the lifeguard lookout building track in westward. The area gradually shelves from 5 to 6 metres within the bay area. There are also 3 yellow visitors moorings (€10.00) with a minimum depth of 3 metres.


Why visit here?
Rosslare derives its name from Irish Ros Láir meaning "the middle peninsula". The name Rosslare Strand is used to distinguish it from the nearby important harbour of Rosslare that overshadows the village and which ironically, originally took its name from Rosslare village.


Rosslare Hotel, built c.1905, now known as Kelly's Resort Hotel
Image: Public Domain


The central feature of Rosslare Strand is undoubtedly its remarkable beach. Segmented by a series of hallmark breakwaters designed to retain sandy deposits, the long fine-sand beach is backed by sand dunes and runs the entire length of the peninsula which extends out into Wexford Harbour. Made up of a soft wind-blown silver sand and small stones it is ideal for families to play upon. The beach is very safe, gently sloping into the long and shallow Rosslare Bay. Being east facing it is typically free from prevailing wind-driven waves and the offshore series of sand-banks provide it with an added measure of protection.


Facilities for horses races along Rosslare Strand
Image: Public Domain


What adds to Rosslare Strand’s appeal is its record of being the sunniest location in Ireland. Commonly known in Ireland as being situated in the 'Sunny Southeast', Rosslare is situated in the sunniest part of this blessed corner recording a daily annual average of 4 hours and 20 minutes of sunshine. That represents 300 hours more sunshine each year than the average for Ireland. These characteristics have all combined to attract swimmers and families in droves to Rosslare Strand for more than a century.


Rosslare Strand's lifeguard station overlooking the beach
Image: Michael Harpur


This, in turn, has over the past century shaped the village into a tourist resort with a focus on holiday-based activities. The village consists of a mixture of private domestic dwellings, holiday accommodation and leisure facilities that cater for anything between 200 and 600 beach visitors in the summer season. Facilities include Golf, with a number of good golf courses in the vicinity, tennis, angling, horse riding, walking and a variety of water sports. The beach has been designated with 'Blue Flag' status since 2004 and the long shallow bay is perfect for windsurfing, kayaking, and dinghy sailing with much of the equipment available for hire in the village. There is also a well-equipped children’s playground close to the beach.


The view along Rosslare Strand towards Rosslare Europort
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating point of view, the bay provides good shelter in all westerly conditions winds but is unsafe in onshore winds, although the sea is somewhat broken by the off-lying banks. It offers the benefits of a Rosslare Europort stopover without all the difficulties of trying to fit around the commercial harbour operations. The only downside to the anchorage, and also for that matter the beach, is its lack of air cover that would make it uncomfortable in strong winds. But in lighter conditions on landing, for those with a young family aboard it has the all the leisure amenities attached to one of Ireland’s major tourist beaches.


What facilities are available?
Rosslare strand is a bustling tourist beach. Ashore there is a public car park behind the lifeguard station and the shops, restaurants, pubs and the train station with a service to Dublin are all within a 5 minutes walk. Provisions are more easily obtained from Rosslare Small Boat Harbour where the jetty makes it easy to land and take provisions aboard. There is a supermarket about 5 minutes walk from the harbour and a filling station.


Any security concerns?
Rosslare strand is a tourist bay with little if any boat activity or boating related crime. Vessels that anchor here are most likely be the only boat in the area.


With thanks to:
Phil Murphy, Kilmore Quay Harbour Master.






















Local area overview


About Rosslare Bay (or South Bay)

Rosslare derives its name from Irish Ros Láir meaning "the middle peninsula". The name Rosslare Strand is used to distinguish it from the nearby important harbour of Rosslare that overshadows the village and which ironically, originally took its name from Rosslare village.


Rosslare Hotel, built c.1905, now known as Kelly's Resort Hotel
Image: Public Domain


The central feature of Rosslare Strand is undoubtedly its remarkable beach. Segmented by a series of hallmark breakwaters designed to retain sandy deposits, the long fine-sand beach is backed by sand dunes and runs the entire length of the peninsula which extends out into Wexford Harbour. Made up of a soft wind-blown silver sand and small stones it is ideal for families to play upon. The beach is very safe, gently sloping into the long and shallow Rosslare Bay. Being east facing it is typically free from prevailing wind-driven waves and the offshore series of sand-banks provide it with an added measure of protection.


Facilities for horses races along Rosslare Strand
Image: Public Domain


What adds to Rosslare Strand’s appeal is its record of being the sunniest location in Ireland. Commonly known in Ireland as being situated in the 'Sunny Southeast', Rosslare is situated in the sunniest part of this blessed corner recording a daily annual average of 4 hours and 20 minutes of sunshine. That represents 300 hours more sunshine each year than the average for Ireland. These characteristics have all combined to attract swimmers and families in droves to Rosslare Strand for more than a century.


Rosslare Strand's lifeguard station overlooking the beach
Image: Michael Harpur


This, in turn, has over the past century shaped the village into a tourist resort with a focus on holiday-based activities. The village consists of a mixture of private domestic dwellings, holiday accommodation and leisure facilities that cater for anything between 200 and 600 beach visitors in the summer season. Facilities include Golf, with a number of good golf courses in the vicinity, tennis, angling, horse riding, walking and a variety of water sports. The beach has been designated with 'Blue Flag' status since 2004 and the long shallow bay is perfect for windsurfing, kayaking, and dinghy sailing with much of the equipment available for hire in the village. There is also a well-equipped children’s playground close to the beach.


The view along Rosslare Strand towards Rosslare Europort
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating point of view, the bay provides good shelter in all westerly conditions winds but is unsafe in onshore winds, although the sea is somewhat broken by the off-lying banks. It offers the benefits of a Rosslare Europort stopover without all the difficulties of trying to fit around the commercial harbour operations. The only downside to the anchorage, and also for that matter the beach, is its lack of air cover that would make it uncomfortable in strong winds. But in lighter conditions on landing, for those with a young family aboard it has the all the leisure amenities attached to one of Ireland’s major tourist beaches.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Rosslare Europort (Rosslare Harbour) - 0.3 miles E
Ballytrent - 1.5 miles SSE
Carne - 2 miles S
Little Saltee (landing beach) - 6.8 miles SW
Little Saltee (east side) - 6.8 miles SW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Wexford Harbour - 4 miles NW
Cahore (Polduff) - 12.2 miles NNE
Courtown Harbour - 14.8 miles N
Arklow - 20.7 miles NNE
Wicklow Harbour - 28.1 miles NNE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Rosslare Bay (or South Bay).




































Local area overview



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:


Ron Lub wrote this review on May 29th 2019:

Good Anchorage, there are also 3 yellow visitors moorings (€ 10,00) with a minimum depth of 3 mtr.
we anchored more south in the corner becouse the southern swell..
very good holding, watch out for fishmarks...

Average Rating: ****


Michael Harpur wrote this review on Feb 21st 2020:

Thank you Ron, I think that is a far better primary location and as such adjusted it.

Average Rating: Unrated

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