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Gosport Marina

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Overview





Gosport Marina is situated on the south coast of England, on the east side of The Solent, close within and on the west side of Portsmouth Harbour. It is a large scale modern marina with ample shore facilities opposite the historic naval dock yards of Portsmouth.

Located within the protected natural harbour the marina provides good protection. Outer berths can be somewhat subject to wash from the heavily trafficked waterway. Safe access is available night or day, at any state of the tide and in all reasonable conditions.
Please note

As the marina accommodates visitors in slots freed up by absent resident berth-holders it is advisable to make contact in advance of any intended stay.




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Keyfacts for Gosport Marina
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: Can be subject to wash from commercial vessels

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2.5 metres (8.2 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
July 17th 2018

Summary

A good location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: Can be subject to wash from commercial vessels



 +44 2392 524 811      gosport@premiermarinas.com      Ch.80 [Gosport Marina]
Position and approaches
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Haven position

50° 47.893' N, 001° 6.985' W

This is midway between the head of the outer jetty and the northern dolphin with the marina entrance.


What are the key points of the approach?

The entry and the run-up thorough The Solent and Southampton Water are covered in
The Solent and Isle of Wight Route location coastal description. Approaches to Portsmouth Harbour and its entry can be found in the Gunwharf Quays Marina Click to view haven entry.

  • Continue up the harbour from the Ballast Bank for ¼ of a mile to the marina’s entrance on the western shore.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Gosport Marina for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Royal Clarence Marina - 0.2 miles NW
  2. Gunwharf Quays Marina - 0.2 miles SE
  3. Haslar Marina - 0.2 miles S
  4. Hardway Sailing Club - 0.7 miles NNW
  5. Stokes Bay - 1.2 miles SW
  6. WicorMarine Yacht Haven - 1.7 miles NNW
  7. Port Solent Marina - 1.7 miles N
  8. Southsea Marina - 1.9 miles E
  9. Portsmouth Marine Engineering - 2.2 miles NW
  10. Langstone Harbour - 2.3 miles E
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Royal Clarence Marina - 0.2 miles NW
  2. Gunwharf Quays Marina - 0.2 miles SE
  3. Haslar Marina - 0.2 miles S
  4. Hardway Sailing Club - 0.7 miles NNW
  5. Stokes Bay - 1.2 miles SW
  6. WicorMarine Yacht Haven - 1.7 miles NNW
  7. Port Solent Marina - 1.7 miles N
  8. Southsea Marina - 1.9 miles E
  9. Portsmouth Marine Engineering - 2.2 miles NW
  10. Langstone Harbour - 2.3 miles E
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Gosport Marina is situated on a peninsula on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour opposite the City of Portsmouth. The marina is located ½ mile within the entrance on the western or port side, and on the south side of Cold Harbour.

Gosport Marina has 519 berths, 80 dry stack berths and 26 swinging moorings. It can accommodate vessels with drafts of up to 2.5 metres and 25 metres LOA.

The marina holds no specific visitor berths and accommodates visiting yachts in the berths of resident holders who are away. It is therefore advisable to make berthing arrangements in advance by contacting the marina on VHF Ch 80 P: +44 23 9252 4811, general enquiries E: gosport@premiermarinas.com, berthing enquiries, E: gosportberths@premiermarinas.com . The Marina Reception is open 24 hours a day.




Convergance Point The Solent and Isle of Wight Route location coastal description provides approach details. Approaches to Portsmouth Harbour and its entry can be found in the Gunwharf Quays Marina Click to view haven entry.

Continue up the harbour from the head of the Boat Channel, at the Ballast Bank mark, for a ¼ of a mile to the marina’s 250-metre wide entrance on the western shore.



The marina is protected on it southern side by a breakwater that extends 100 metres from the southern entrance point and a 600-metre long pile pier sweeping around from the north shore. Within this is a 400-metre floating breakwater that sweeps around the marina. By night the floating breakwater exhibits lights from its northern, 2F.R (vert), and southern ends, 2F.G(vert).



In the middle of the entrance, between the heads of the outer jetties, are two dolphins. By night the Boat Channel’s direction light is exhibited from the southern most of the two dolphins.




Haven location Berth as directed by the marina office. Vessels assigned berths on pontoons northwestern 'J' 'K' 'L' 'M' as well as 'I' 'H' 'G' 'F' 'E' and the northern side of 'D', all behind the breakwater, should proceed northward between the floating breakwater and the outer jetty. Pontoons 'A' 'B' 'C' 'D' are accessed between the breakwater extending from the southern entrance point and the southern end of the breakwater.




Why visit here?
Gosport, often spelled Goseporte, Gozeport, Gosberg, Godsport, derives its name from the conjunction of old English word Gos with Port meaning ‘goose town’. This is either because geese were sold in the market here or because wild geese gathered in the area.

Although Gosport most likely started life as a fishing hamlet, the name signifies a market town rather than a harbour and Gosport was not of itself recorded in Domesday. The area, now occupied by the town, was recorded within the manor of Alverstoke which was a central village and the principal settlement in the area at the time. Domesday noted that the area was a possession of St. Swithun’s monastery, Winchester and the 'villeins' of Alverstoke were ‘farming’ or renting the manor at the time of the Domesday Survey 1086. Soon after landing the Normans established the first fortification on the peninsula. This was a motte and bailey next to the village where the River Alver enters the Solent at Stokes Bay. The site provided a vantage point over the Solent, Stokes Bay, Lee-on-the-Solent and the Isle of Wight.


A frigate running into Portsmouth with Fort Blockhouse off her port quarter
Image: CC0


The earliest reference to Gosport by name dates from 1241 when ‘Goseport’ was recorded in the Curia Regis Rolls. In the thirteenth century, the bishops of Winchester created several new towns in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight including New Alresford, Overton, Newtown in Hampshire, as well as Newtown on the Isle of Wight. There does not appear to be a grant of a market charter for Gosport during this period and the new town did not achieve borough status. It is uncertain if it ever achieved success in the medieval period as it would have had stiff competition from the towns of Portsmouth, with a charter across the harbour, Fareham to the north and Titchfield to the northwest.


Gosport with Portsmouth in the backdrop between 1890 and 1900
Image: CC0


Nevertheless, Gosport, together with Portsmouth, was called upon by Edward I to provide a ship for his campaign against the Scots in 1302. This demand was usually made on recognised ports and included places such as Southampton, Hamble and St Helens, and the port of Brading on the Isle of Wight. It suggests that there was an established maritime tradition at Gosport by that date at least. A 1341 survey of the manor of Alverstoke recorded that there were ‘formerly fifteen ships and that there were no traders – all the occupiers were employed in agriculture’. In the mid-sixteenth century, John Leland described Gosport as ‘a little village of fishermen’ with a small chapel that most likely dated back to Norman times. But this was all set to change largely on account of Portsmouth being situated on the other side of the harbour.


Fort Blockhouse
Image: Karen Roe


When shipbuilding took off in the Royal Navy dockyards in the sixteenth century, Gosport, rapidly developed as a naval satellite town supplying auxiliary services. An ironworks was founded in the town, ship-building increased and Gosport became home to many of the Portsmouth dockyard workers. Other industries such as rope-making developed and the town became an important victualling station.


Fort Brockhurst
Image: Julian Colander via CC ASA 4.0


The economy further accelerated during the eighteenth century when certain naval functions were transferred from Portsmouth. In 1746, work began on the Royal Naval Hospital at Haslar, which, upon completion in 1860, was the largest brick-built building in the country. In 1752, the navy established a cooperage and brewery at the Weevil Yard in Gosport, and in 1757 the Royal Ordnance Depot was moved to Priddy’s Hard. Between 1828 and 1832, this was upgraded to house the navy’s main victualling and fuel depot and was renamed the Royal Clarence Yard after the Duke of Clarence and remained in service until the 1980’s.

Mine depot at Priddy's Hard 1944
Image: CC0
The strategic importance of Gosport, in the defence of Portsmouth Harbour, was recognised as early as the fifteenth century when a pair of towers, one either side of the harbour mouth, was built in 1418. A blockhouse and bulwark were built on the Gosport side of the harbour in 1540, and an iron chain was installed stretching between the towers, which could be raised across the harbour mouth to prevent entry by enemy ships. Landward earthwork defences encircling the town were added by the 1720s which effectively constrained the town and choked off transport communications. During the Georgian period, the 1750s, these walls were rebuilt, enlarged and extended and further additions were made in response to a French invasion threat of 1779.


By 1860 the Gosport Lines had 58 guns. No.1 Bastion, for example, had mounted 14 guns in brick-lined emplacements firing over the parapet. The ramparts were extended as the victualling and armaments manufacturing role of the town grew to the north of the town centre. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries there were repeated concerns over the threat of a French invasion, and so forts were constructed around Portsmouth Harbour to protect it from landward attack. These forts included Forts Elson, Brockhurst, Rowner, and Grange to the west of Gosport. Added to this were four ‘Palmerston’ sea forts completed in the eastern approaches to The Solent by 1878 which made the combined Gosport and Portsmouth area the most defended position on the planet.


Spitbank Sea Fort, now a hotel, located to the southeast of Gosport
Image: Amanda Retreats via CC BY-SA 3.0
Gosport was heavily bombed during the second world war which opened up areas for redevelopment in the historic core of the town. The townscape of Gosport then changed considerably when large blocks of buildings, many extensively bomb damaged, were demolished and several new roads were driven through the previously built-up areas.


During this time the town’s over-reliance on the navy led to serious problems in the local economy. With the decline of the British Empire, Portsmouth’s shipbuilding jobs fell from 46% of the workforce in 1951 to 14% in 1966, drastically reducing the economic activity upon which Gosport thrived. Finally, when in the early 1980s Portsmouth dockyard closed, most of the former naval and military installations on the Gosport side had long since been vacated, leaving empty sites.

Gosport today with Portsmouth in the foreground
Image: Ian Stannard via CC BY-SA 2.0


Today the twentieth-century expansion of Gosport and Fareham has now all but amalgamated the two settlements. Gosport still retains some of its naval legacies by being home to HMS Sultan and a Naval Armament Supply Facility as well as a Helicopter Repair base. Many of the fortifications and naval installations have reopened as museums, which make the three local deep-water marinas highly attractive to visit for young and old boaters alike.


Gosport submarine museum
Image: CC0


The Royal Navy Submarine Museum has exhibits including Holland 1, the Royal Navy's first submarine, and the Second World War submarine HMS Alliance. The Royal Navy’s former armaments depot at Priddy’s Hard is now a place where you can learn about the weapons used by the Royal Navy at ‘Explosion! - Museum of Naval Firepower’. The Museum of Diving, housed in a former Victorian Gun Battery, showcases the best range of military, commercial and recreational diving equipment in Europe. These and many more museums are dotted around Gosport today, and if this is not enough naval history, a quick five-minute ferry ride across the harbour provides access to HMS Victory, The Mary Rose and HMS Warrior and the National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth’s Historic Dockyard.


HMS Alliance at Gosport submarine museum
Image: CC0


Alternatively, there is Portsmouth’s Gunwharf Quays with its outlet shopping, restaurants, cinema and the landmark 170 metre high Emirates Spinnaker Tower, that may be ascended albeit for a princely sum. Gosport Waterfront should not be overlooked as it is an attraction in its own right. With views out over the harbour entrance, there is a constant bustle of yachts, ferries and warships sailing in and out, with the Falkland Gardens providing a great vantage point. Spread along the waterfront, and especially within easy reach of the town’s three marinas, are a choice of waterfront bars and restaurants to relax in. Those with youngsters aboard who want more beach time will find that the adjacent Lee-on-the-Solent and Stokes Bay offers lots of family activities that won’t break the bank.


Gosport Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


Gosport Marina is owned and operated by Premier Marinas Limited based in Hampshire. The company owns and manages eight coastal marinas and boatyards in England offering berth holders freedom to roam between their facilities if space is available. From a sailing perspective, Gosport is within easy reach of the eastern side of The Solent, east Wight and Chichester Harbour. It has excellent rail and road connections with excellent provisioning and plenty to keep a crew interested ashore should a big low pressure threaten to interrupt a cruise.


What facilities are available?
All pontoon berths provide electricity and fresh water, free Wi-Fi and a first class ablutions block. The launderette, in the Marina Reception building, has coin operated washing and drying machines (£1 coins). The self-serve fuel bay sells both diesel and unleaded petrol. Please call on VHF Ch.80 before heading for the fuel bay. Gas is available from the Marina Reception. Premier has full recycling facilities onsite.

The marina features a chandlery plus a boatyard with numerous boatyard and engineering specialists in and around the premises. Gosport Marina’s Endeavour Quay boatyard is ideally equipped to carry out routine boat maintenance for a wide range of vessels and to make running repairs. Boatyard equipment includes a 180 tonne travel hoist, 35 tonne mobile crane, 45 tonne boat mover, a 14 tonne static crane, 14 tonne boat mover and a specialist marine forklift that serves the marina’s dry stack.

Gosport High Street is two minutes away with shops and banks. The Gosport Ferry provides quick access to Portsmouth Harbour railway station, terminus of the Portsmouth Direct Line to London. A ferry service to and from Gosport operates every 15 minutes.


Any security concerns?
Pontoon and bridgehead access is restricted and only available to guests with a key fob.

CCTV cameras cover berths, car parks, bridgeheads, and the shoreside. There are also 24-hour security patrols.


With thanks to:
Michael Harpur S/Y Whistler and Sophia Patterson Premier Marina. Photography with thanks to Michael Harpur and Karen Roe.


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Premier Marinas’ welcome to Gosport Marina







A brief look at Gosport in Hampshire



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