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Hardway Sailing Club

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Overview





Hardway Sailing Club is situated on the south coast of England, within and on the west side of Portsmouth Harbour. It is an active club with a large pontoon that fronts the village of Hardway.

Located within the natural harbour of Portsmouth it provides good protection but can be exposed to a large waterway in strong easterly conditions. Safe access is available in all reasonable conditions, during daylight hours.



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Keyfacts for Hardway Sailing Club
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesQuick and easy access from open waterSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
July 17th 2018

Summary

A good location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesQuick and easy access from open waterSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

50° 48.887' N, 001° 7.916' W

This is the head of the Hardway Sailing Club Pontoon


What are the key points of the approach?

The entry and the run-up thorough The Solent and Southampton Water are covered in
The Solent and Isle of Wight Route location coastal description. Approaches to Portsmouth Harbour and its entry can be found in the Gunwharf Quays Marina Click to view haven entry and the run up Fareham Lake is described in the Fareham Marina Click to view haven entry.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Hardway Sailing Club for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Royal Clarence Marina - 0.5 miles SSE
  2. Gosport Marina - 0.7 miles SSE
  3. Haslar Marina - 0.9 miles SSE
  4. Gunwharf Quays Marina - 0.9 miles SE
  5. WicorMarine Yacht Haven - 1 miles NNW
  6. Port Solent Marina - 1.3 miles NNE
  7. Stokes Bay - 1.5 miles SSW
  8. Portsmouth Marine Engineering - 1.5 miles NW
  9. Fareham Marina - 1.7 miles NW
  10. Southsea Marina - 2.4 miles ESE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Royal Clarence Marina - 0.5 miles SSE
  2. Gosport Marina - 0.7 miles SSE
  3. Haslar Marina - 0.9 miles SSE
  4. Gunwharf Quays Marina - 0.9 miles SE
  5. WicorMarine Yacht Haven - 1 miles NNW
  6. Port Solent Marina - 1.3 miles NNE
  7. Stokes Bay - 1.5 miles SSW
  8. Portsmouth Marine Engineering - 1.5 miles NW
  9. Fareham Marina - 1.7 miles NW
  10. Southsea Marina - 2.4 miles ESE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Hardway Sailing Club fronts Hardway village, a suburb of Gosport, on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour. The club is located just under two miles from the harbour mouth where the inner harbour widens out and merges into the Fareham and Porchester lakes.

The club openly welcomes visitors to their pontoon. A flat rate of £10 is charged per day for up to seven days. Prices then rise to £22 per day to 28 days after which it becomes £44 a day.




Convergance Point The Solent and Isle of Wight Route location coastal description provides approach details. Approaches to Portsmouth Harbour and its entry can be found in the Gunwharf Quays Marina Click to view haven entry. The run-up Fareham Lake and approaches to Portsmouth Marine Engineering is described for Fareham Marina Click to view haven.

The clubhouse and pontoon are located at the southern end of Fareham Lake. Four pontoons will be seen along the shore fronting the village of Hardway of which the sailing club is the northern most. The first is the large ‘L’ shape ‘Vospers Jetty’. The second is ‘Sultan Landing’ used by launches to take vessels to Portsmouth moorings. Then there is a short 80 metre public pontoon close to the longer 250 metre long Hardway Sailing Club pontoons.



Haven location The seaward pontoon has about 1.5 metres at neaps but almost dries at the bottom of large springs.

Fin keel vessels can comfortably come alongside the inner pontoon at high water. The sea bed surrounding the pontoons is made up of a soft silt so vessels will comfortably sit into the mud as the tide falls away. Expect at least two metres of water at the inner most pontoon at high water.




Why visit here?
The name Hardway stems from providing a solid landing position in the shallow waters and mudflats of Portsmouth Harbour. The early settlement was known as ‘Elson Hardway’, or ‘Elson Hard’, up to the 18th century after which it became shortened to its present Hardway.




Portsmouth’s shoreline had a number of these historic ‘hards’. As late as the mid-nineteenth century charts noted as ‘Priddy’s Hard’, ‘Goliath’s Hard’, ‘Lower Hard’, ‘Pinney’s Hard’ and ‘Convict’s Hard’. Piers and quays now occupy many of the locations of these original hards. ‘Convict’s Hard’, as its name suggests, was used to transport convicts to prison hulks. Prison hulks were decommissioned ships, usually with their masts reduced or removed, that were used as floating prisons. Authorities used them in the 18th and 19th centuries to alleviate the pressure on prisons. They also served as a cheap alternative to building more prisons on land. Lines of these Prison Hulks were moored in the Thames, Langstone Harbour, and in Fareham Lake off Hardway.




Hardway’s history runs much deeper than this. Given its prominent position by the harbour and solid landing area it has had a long history of habitation. Villagers farmed the surrounding open land and fished the harbour but there is also evidence of a long history of boat building here. The settlement was historically somewhat isolated from Gosport by Forton Lake. In the latter part of the eighteenth century, following the relocation of the Royal Ordnance Depot from Portsmouth to Priddy’s Hard, the west end of Forton Lake was gradually reclaimed. This made Hardway more accessible and spurred its growth thereafter. Much of Hardway’s village character stems from the development in the 18th and 19th century that followed this.


Hardway and particularly the foreshore fronting Hardway Sailing Club went on to play a major role in World War II. The foreshore area was reclaimed in preparations for the D-Day landings. The beach was strengthened, approaches dredged, and concrete mats which due to their appearance were known as ‘Chocolate Blocks’, were laid down here. Many ships and craft that were anchored in Portsmouth Harbour prior to the invasion used the Hardway foreshore for refuelling and repairs. When it came to the invasion Hardway was one of the three primary points used for embarkation.


Because Hardway provided a relatively sheltered location that avoided town traffic it specifically catered to the large ‘Landing Ship, Tank’s (LST), or tank landing ships. Of the 203 British and American LST’s involved in D-Day 192 of them had departed from Hardway. Many of these returned with wounded soldiers and prisoners to be reloaded and then returned to the Normandy beaches. It was not until six months after D-Day, when the Belgian port of Antwerp was captured, that the use of Hardway lessened. It continued nevertheless to load food and medicines destined for the starving people of Europe.




Hardway today is a quiet suburban suburban village made up of a few industrial estates, and two-storey residential housing built along a 19th century road plan. The character of the area, particularly from the foreshore, is dominated by its relationship to Portsmouth Harbour to which there are clear views.

Hardway Sailing Club is a very friendly club that offers the budget sailor a very efficient Portsmouth Harbour berth that is nonetheless just a short walk, or ferry ride, from all the city attractions. It also offers a location to dry out and scrub at fraction of what would be charged elsewhere. The club bar is also suitable for those of modest means where one can enjoy good company and food overlooking one of the most famous and historic harbours in the world.


What facilities are available?
The club has shower and toilet facilities. It also serves food and has a bar. It is the ideal location to dry out and scrub. The club grids cost £10 per tide and a high pressure hose can be rented for £10 with power tokens costing £3 (2016).

Basic provisions can be found in a local shop about five minutes walk from the club. Gosport town centre, about 20 minutes walk, and Portsmouth, via the ferry from Gosport, have extensive shopping capabilities and banks etc.

Portsmouth Harbour railway station is the terminus of the Portsmouth Direct Line to London. The Gosport Ferry service crosses to Portsmouth every 15 minutes.


With thanks to:
Michael Harpur S/Y Whistler. Photography with thanks to Michael Harpur.


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