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Cahersiveen Marina

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Overview





Cahersiveen Marina is located on Ireland's west coast, on the south side of the entrance to Dingle Bay and two miles upriver from Knightstown, Valentia. It is a small but well-sheltered marina close to the provincial town of Cahersiveen.

The marina provides complete protection and safe access is available in all reasonable conditions. Although completely protected within the harbour and river area, no approach should be made to Valentia Harbour during northwest gales. A heavy sea breaks right across the harbour entrance and you should not attempt either of the entrances that lie on either side of Beginish Island unless you have a highly competent crew with very good local knowledge.
Please note

It is also possible to anchor in the river off the town of Cahersiveen.




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Keyfacts for Cahersiveen Marina
 +353 66 947 2777      +353 87 065 9089      info@cahersiveenmarina.ie      Ch.37, 80
Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.


Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: harbour fees may be charged


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationNavigation lights to support a night approachSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityRemote or quiet secluded locationScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableGas availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingBus service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaTourist Information office available

Last modified
May 14th 2018; suggest a correction?

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Now Force

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with attentive navigation required for access.

LWS draught

1.9 metres (6.23 feet).

Today's tide estimates

HW 03:25 (3m) LW 07:15 (0.8m)
HW 13:27 (2.9m) LW 19:25 (0.8m)
Now approaching Springs

Swell today




Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.


Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: harbour fees may be charged


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationNavigation lights to support a night approachSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityRemote or quiet secluded locationScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableGas availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingBus service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaTourist Information office available

Last modified
May 14th 2018; suggest a correction?

Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 56.892' N, 010° 13.950' W

This is at the entrance to the marina situated in its northeastern corner.

What is the initial fix?

The following Canganiv Spit Starboard Buoy Fl.G.5s will set up a final approach:
51° 56.119' N, 010° 16.850' W
This is close north of the first starboard buoy that marks river the fairway. It is situated to the east of Beginish Island, at the mouth of the Valentia River estuary and is the convergence point for north around and south around routes around the island.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.
  • Seaward approaches to Valentia Harbour can be found in the Knightstown Click to view haven entry.

  • Approaches to the river from Knightstown with sufficient depth to clear the deepest part of Caher Bar, 1.4 LAT metres, that is supported by leading marks.

  • Then two miles up the river fairway to the marina has ample lit port and starboard marks.


  • Not what you need?
    Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cahersiveen Marina for your convenience.
    Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
    1. Knightstown - 1.5 miles SW
    2. Portmagee - 3.8 miles SW
    3. Ballinskellig Bay - 5.1 miles S
    4. Ventry Harbour - 6.9 miles NNW
    5. Dingle Harbour - 7.1 miles N
    6. Darrynane Harbour - 7.2 miles SSE
    7. West Cove - 7.8 miles SSE
    8. Great Blasket Island - 8.7 miles NW
    9. Sneem Harbour - 9.3 miles ESE
    10. Smerwick Harbour - 9.6 miles NNW
    Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
    1. Knightstown - 1.5 miles SW
    2. Portmagee - 3.8 miles SW
    3. Ballinskellig Bay - 5.1 miles S
    4. Ventry Harbour - 6.9 miles NNW
    5. Dingle Harbour - 7.1 miles N
    6. Darrynane Harbour - 7.2 miles SSE
    7. West Cove - 7.8 miles SSE
    8. Great Blasket Island - 8.7 miles NW
    9. Sneem Harbour - 9.3 miles ESE
    10. Smerwick Harbour - 9.6 miles NNW
    Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


    How to get in?
    Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

    Expand to new tab or fullscreen



    Cahersiveen Marina
    Image: Dennis Turner Caherciveen marina CC BY-SA 2.0


    Cahersiveen Marina is situated on the River Fertha, charted as the Valentia River and often called the Caher River, two miles upriver from where it splits around Beginish Island to flow into the east end of Valentia Harbour and Doulus Bay. The marina is located 200 metres downstream of Cahersiveen's Town Quay which is the main town on the Iveragh Peninsula.

    The marina has 93 berths and can accommodate vessels drawing up to 2.6 metres. Approaches through River Fertha has depths of not less than 3 metres up to the marina entrance.

    Beginish Island
    Image: Elkringo via CC ASA 1.2


    Convergance Point Approaches to Valentia Harbour and its entry can be found in the Knightstown Click to view haven entry. The river flows into the east end of Valentia Harbour about a ½ mile to the northwest of Knightstown. It is entered close east of Beginish Island, between Laght Point on the north and Reenard Point on the south with a distance of ½ a mile between them.

    From Knightstown, it may be entred over highly protected waters that are obstructed by the Caher Bar with 1.4 LAT metres over it. Alternatively, it may be accessed from seaward by coming around to the north of Beginish Island where Lough Kay has the deeper Doulus Bar, with 2.4 LAT metres of cover. But, in rough conditions, there may be breakers on this bar as it is exposed to the ocean swell whereas the approach from Knightstown is in sheltered waters.

    From Knightstown, pass close east of Canganniv Spit East Cardinal marker, situated on the East end of Beginish Island, and steer a course to pass close east to the fairway's southern port mark, the area where the initial fix is located, which should be passed to starboard. This passes the eastern side of the Canganniv Spit which extends almost a ¼ of a mile to the southeast of Beginish Island. This is the deepest part of Caher Bar and it is supported by alignment marks with leading lights, Oc.G.6s on wooden poles with faded red and white bands in the Knightstown Harbour area, leading over the bar on 019°T / 199°T as best seen on a chart.

    The town quay and river looking westward from the bridge
    Image: Robert Linsdell


    Once over the Caher Bar the paths around Beginish Island converge and pass into the fairway to Cahersiveen. This is a distance of two miles that has a least charted depth of 3 metres in the fairway and ample closely spaced and lit port and starboard marks leading the way.

    Cahersiveen Town Quay immediately above the marina
    Image: Google


    Haven location The marina will be found on the southeast side of the river, close west of the town quay and a ¼ of a mile below where the river is spanned by bridge. Berth as directed by the marina staff.

    The 50 m long Cahersiveen Quay has depths of 3.5 metres alongside and it is also possible to anchor off it 3-5 metres.


    What's the story here?
    Cahersiveen, which can be spelt Cahercivee and Cahirciveen, derives its name from the Gaelic Cathair Saidhbhín, meaning 'stone fort of Saidhbhín'.

    Sitting on the banks of the River Fertha it is part of 'The Ring of Kerry' that enjoys an international reputation for being one of the world's most diverse and beautiful circular drives. Those who drive it can admire quickly varying coastal landscapes as well as forests, mountains and medieval ruins. Of these outstanding structures, Cahersiveen has some of the most impressive and they all lay within walking distance of the town. The first of which, the barracks of the former Royal Irish Constabulary, can be seen from the marina berth, upriver and on the southeast side of the bridge.

    The Barracks Cahersiveen Heritage Centre
    Image: @storytravelers


    Cahersiveen was where the first shots of the Fenian Rising were fired in 1867, and it is no doubt that this led to the barracks being constructed there between the years of 1869 and 1871 as a police station for the Royal Irish Constabulary. It was raised to the ground by anti-treaty forces during the Civil War on 24th August 1922. In 1991, 69 years after the building had been destroyed, a group of people decided to rebuild it and in September 1996 the 'new' Old Barracks was officially opened as the Heritage Centre of Cahersiveen. Its unusual design, according to local lore (the truth you may decide for yourself), was caused by its plans being originally intended for a British barracks in India.


    Ballycarbery Castle
    Image: Michael G Kenny via CC BY-SA 2.0


    Architecture enthusiasts prepared to take on a hike, or hire a bike available from the local bike shop, will be highly rewarded for any effort to branch out further to visit the 16th-century Ballycarbery Castle and its nearby Ring Forts. Ballycarbery Castle is situated about 3 kilometres (2 mi) from Cahersiveen. Its significant ruins, constructed in the 16th century, stand high on a grassy hill facing the sea. A short distance from Ballycarbery Castle stands the ancient and unique Cahergall and Leacanabuile stone forts.

    Stone forts, which are found mainly in the west of Ireland, are notoriously difficult to date. Some are thought to be Iron Age, about 500 BC to 400 AD, while many are simply stone versions of the common earthen ring fort which was the typical farmstead of the Early Historic period, about 400 to 1200 AD.


    Cahergall Cashel Interior
    Image: Peter Moore via CC BY-SA 2.0


    Cahergall Fort derives its name from the Gaelic an Chathair Gheal meaning the Bright Stone Fort. It is a particularly fine stone ringfort, also known as a 'cashel', with a massive dry-stone wall. There are flights of steps and terraces in the inner face of the wall and the upper parts of these, together with the lintelled entrance have been recently reconstructed. The remains of a large circular dry-stone building lie within the fort indicates that it was the estate of somebody of great standing 1,000 years ago.


    Leacanabuaile Cashel Interior
    Image: Peter Moore via CC BY-SA 2.0


    Leacanabuaile, meaning in Gaelic hillside of the milking-place is located immediately northwest of Cahergal. It is another stone ringfort or cashel that was built around the 9th century AD. It was most likely a defended farmstead and has a circular structure with an internal diameter of 30 metres (98 ft), with outer walls that are over 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) high and 3.3 metres (11 ft) thick. Protected on three sides by steep grassy slopes it has its entrance on the east side that leads into three stone beehive houses and a souterrain. The other main attraction in the area is the Daniel O’ Connell Memorial Church situated in Cahersiveen, the only one in Ireland named after a lay person. There are countless hikes and walks that meander through the towns surrounding hills.

    River Ferta estuary with the mountains of Castlequin and Knocknadobar providing for ample hikes
    Image: Cqui via CC BY-SA 3.0


    Today Cahersiveen is principally a market town that the tourist industry has largely passed by. With a population of around 1200 people, it is the principal town in the region and is one of the westernmost towns in Ireland and hence one of the westernmost towns in Europe. It is about a 1km walk into the town where there are many friendly pubs to enjoy some good porter and craic.


    Cahersiveen Public Offices
    Image: Robert Linsdell


    From a sailing point of view, Cahersiveen Marina is an ideal provisioning location for western seaboard cruisers and the perfect place to await fine weather to visit the World Heritage Site Monument of UNESCO site of Skellig Michael Click to view haven. It is also an ideal base to cruise around Valentia Island or Dingle Bay and visit the several uninhabited islands.

    Likewise, if you have to endure some bad weather, or you have to return home, it is a place where you can safely leave your boat. The marina is well maintained and the staff are very friendly, and shore power is part of the deal. Although near to the town it is quiet and safe.


    What facilities are available?
    The marina has toilets, showers and laundry facilities, and lift-out capabilities up to 20 tonnes. Cahersiveen town, a 15-minute' walk, has all the usual shopping facilities etc that may be required.


    With thanks to:
    Peter Craven for first sharing this Haven.


    Expand to new tab or fullscreen
    Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
    The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




    Cahersiveen Marina
    Image: eOceanic thanks Dennis Turner via CC BY-SA 2.0


    Cahersiveen Town Quay immediately above the marina
    Image: eOceanic thanks Steve Edge via CC BY-SA 2.0


    The former Royal Irish Constabulary barracks now a heritage centre seen from the
    marina

    Image: eOceanic thanks Dennis Turner via CC BY-SA 2.0




    Cahersiveen Marina




    Leacanabuaile Fort



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