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Ramsgate

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Overview





Ramsgate is a coastal town situated three miles south of North Foreland, the southern entrance point into the Thames Estuary. It has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate provides a cross-Channel ferry service for both passengers and freight.

Ramsgate is a coastal town situated three miles south of North Foreland, the southern entrance point into the Thames Estuary. It has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate provides a cross-Channel ferry service for both passengers and freight.

Tucked away within the inner harbour, and behind its substantial breakwaters, the marina offers complete protection. Safe access is available night or day, at any stage of the tide and in all reasonable conditions.
Please note

Although the harbour can be entered at any state of the tide, care is necessary as the stream sets strongly across the entrance. In particular, it has been reported that the northeast-going stream produces an eddy off the head of South Breakwater, which sets southwest taking vessels onto the breakwater.




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Keyfacts for Ramsgate



Last modified
January 15th 2019

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesScuba diving cylinder refill capabilitiesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require considerationNote: harbour fees may be charged



Berthing  +44 1843 572100       portoframsgate@thanet.gov.uk     portoframsgate.co.uk/      Ch.80 [Ramsgate Marina]
Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 19.662' N, 001° 25.292' E

This is the head of the South Breakwater at the entrance. Upon it stands a beacon that exhibits a light VQ.R.10m5M.

What is the initial fix?

The following Ramsgate Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
51° 19.453' N, 001° 26.530' E
This is close to the No.4 port buoy, Q.R., of the approach channel about a ¾ of a mile from the entrance. It is in the 'Recommended Track for Small Craft' that lies close south of the primary approach channel and at the recommended crossing track, at right angles to the channel, on the west side of No.3 and 4 buoys.


What are the key points of the approach?

Convergance Point Offshore details are available in the southeast England’s Coastal Overview for North Foreland to the Isle of Wight Route location.

  • Obtain permission from Ramsgate Port Control VHF Ch. 14 call sign [Ramsgate Port Control] before approaching.

  • Approach close south of the main channel noted on charts as the 'Recommended Track for Small Craft'.

  • When entering Royal Harbour pass close to the West Pier to avoid a shoal that extends from the East Pier as also illustrated by the 'Recommended Track for Small Craft'.



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Ramsgate for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Dover - 8.3 miles SSW
  2. Folkestone - 10.8 miles SSW
  3. Rye Harbour - 21.2 miles SW
  4. Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 32.4 miles SW
  5. Newhaven - 37.9 miles WSW
  6. Brighton - 40.6 miles WSW
  7. Shoreham - 43.3 miles WSW
  8. Littlehampton - 50 miles WSW
  9. Dell Quay - 55.7 miles WSW
  10. Chichester Marina - 56.1 miles WSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Dover - 8.3 miles SSW
  2. Folkestone - 10.8 miles SSW
  3. Rye Harbour - 21.2 miles SW
  4. Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 32.4 miles SW
  5. Newhaven - 37.9 miles WSW
  6. Brighton - 40.6 miles WSW
  7. Shoreham - 43.3 miles WSW
  8. Littlehampton - 50 miles WSW
  9. Dell Quay - 55.7 miles WSW
  10. Chichester Marina - 56.1 miles WSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?
Ramsgate Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


The harbour is artificial and enclosed by breakwaters. The South Breakwater which protects the harbour to the south extends 700 metres east from the reclaimed land forming the ferry terminal. The East Pier with its extension, The North Breakwater, protects the harbour to the east and extends 600 metres south from the coast. The harbour is in two parts; to the south is the Port of Ramsgate with ferry berths at its west end; and to the north is the Royal Harbour and its three marinas.

East Bank, which dries to sand and mud, lies in the southeast part of Royal Harbour and is marked by a light buoy (starboard hand). The Inner Harbour, the northwest part of Royal Harbour, is entered through dock gates.

Berths available for visitors in the East and West outer marinas have 24-hour access. Contact Marina Berthing Office VHF Ch.80 call sign [Ramsgate Marina] Harbourmaster and Marina tel 01843 572100

Royal Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur



Convergance Point Offshore details are available in the southeast England’s Coastal Overview for North Foreland to the Isle of Wight Route location. No craft should enter or leave the harbour without prior permission from Ramsgate Port Control VHF Ch. 14 call sign [Ramsgate Port Control].

The approach channel has a maintained depth of 7.5 metres and entry is supported by leading lights:

  • • Front direction light (black triangle point up, orange stripe, on white mast).

  • • Rear light (black triangle point down, orange stripe, on white mast).

From a position east of the harbour entrance, the alignment (270°) of the leading lights leads through the approach channel to the harbour entrance. By night, the approach channel is also covered by the narrow white sector (269°-271°) of the front directional light.

The approach channel is 110 metres wide and marked by light buoys (lateral and cardinal). Shallows lie south of the harbour entrance, the Quern Bank being closest, and the Cross Ledge further south. To the north, the shallows shelve gently with no uncharted hazards.

The approach channel is however used by cross-Channel ferries, fast pilot boats, and other commercial craft. Leisure craft should use the 'Recommended Track for Small Craft' as marked on charts on the south side of this channel.

International Port Traffic Signals regulating the movement of vessels to and from Royal Harbour are exhibited from Port Control on the East Pier. The Royal Harbour Seaward signal applies to vessels entering the harbour limits from seaward. The Royal Harbour signal applies to vessels in Royal Harbour. A Ferry Movement Signal (orange flashing light) is exhibited from Port Control when a ferry is manoeuvring. Whilst the signal is exhibited, no vessel may enter the harbour limits, leave Royal Harbour, or move within Port of Ramsgate without permission from Port Control. Should you need to wait before entering the harbour, the designated holding area for leisure vessels is to the south of the southern breakwater and to the north of the approach channel's No.3 buoy.

Yacht passing through Ramsgate’s outer breakwaters
Image: Michael Harpur



Initial fix location From the initial fix call Ramsgate Port Control [Ramsgate Port Control] on Ch 14 and ask for permission to enter the harbour. On receiving permission to enter, follow the charted 'Recommended Yacht Track' from the No. 4 buoy. Pass close north of the North Quern buoy to clear the shallows and proceed under power through the outer entrance. If required to wait, use one of the above suggested holding areas as convienient.


Ramsgate’s outer breakwaters are low lying, built of rocks and can be
difficult to spot

Image: Michael Harpur


Ramsgate’s outer breakwaters are low lying, built of rocks and can be difficult to spot from the east. The Harbour is entered between the heads of South Breakwater and North Breakwater. The North pier head has a green pillar and platform (Q.G 5M); the South has a red pillar and platform (VQ.R 5M). The helm should pay attention to tidal streams as it sweeps across the entrance, roughly northeast-southwest, at up to 2kn.
Please note

Speed is restricted to a maximum of 5 kn through the water within the harbour.




Keep close to the West Pier to avoid a shoal that extends across the entrance
from the East Pier

Image: Michael Harpur


The entrance to inner Royal Harbour is 300 metres northwest of the entrance and lies between the heads of the West and East Piers, from where lights are exhibited. Harbour Light Buoy (starboard hand) marks a bank extending south from the East Pier head. The buoy may be moved as the bank changes. A light buoy (port hand) moored close west of the Harbour Light Buoy, marks the opposite side of the short approach channel to Royal Harbour.

However, a vessel should keep close to the West Pier to avoid a shoal that extends almost the entire way across the entrance from the East Pier - see charted 'Recommended Track for Small Craft'. Royal Harbour's entrance is 63 metres wide and faces south-southwest.


The three marina areas within Royal Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location The greater part of Royal Harbour is given over to three berthing areas. Immediately to port is West Marina and further north is East Marina both of which have a minimum depth of 2 metres. Large vessels can berth on the outer wavebreak pontoons at both of these marinas.

Large vessels along the wavebreak pontoons of the west Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


The Inner Marina may be accessed at HW ±2 hours via dock gates and a lifting bridge. A red and yellow flag by day and single green light at night indicate the gate is open. It has a maintained depth of 3.0 metres.

The Inner Marina's dock gates and lifting bridge open
Image: Michael Harpur


It is also possible to anchor outside the harbour entrance and south of the breakwater in winds from west-northwest to north-northeast.

© Crown Copyright and/or database rights. Reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office and the UK Hydrographic Office (www.GOV.uk/UKHO). Not to be used for Navigation.


Why visit here?
Ramsgate began as a fishing and farming hamlet. The Christian missionary St. Augustine, sent by Pope Gregory the Great, landed near Ramsgate in 597AD. The town is home to the Shrine of St Augustine.

The earliest reference to the town is in the Kent Hundred Rolls of 1274-5, both as Remmesgate (in the local personal name of ‘Christina de Remmesgate’) and Remisgat (with reference to the town). The names Ramisgate and Raunsgate appear in the parish of St. Laurence records circa 1290. These are all derived from late Anglo-Saxon ‘Hremmes’ from earlier ‘Hræfnes’ (raven’s) and ‘geat’ (gate), with reference to the gap in the cliffs. In 1357, the area became known as Ramesgate. Ramsgate was a member of the Confederation of Cinque Ports, under the 'Limb' of Sandwich, Kent.

The construction of Ramsgate Harbour began in 1749 and was completed in about 1850. The harbour has the distinction of being the only Royal Harbour in the United Kingdom. Because of its proximity to mainland Europe, Ramsgate was a chief embarkation point both during the Napoleonic Wars and for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.

The Official Illustrated Guide to South-Eastern and North and Mid-Kent Railways (June 1863) by George Measom describes Ramsgate like this: 'It is impossible to speak too favourably of this first rate town, its glorious sands, its bathing, its hotels, libraries, churches, etc. etc. not forgetting its bracing climate... The streets of Ramsgate are well paved or macadamed and brilliantly lighted with gas.'

The architect A W Pugin and his sons lived in Ramsgate and built several important buildings there, including St Augustine's Church, The Grange, St Augustine's Abbey, and The Granville Hotel.

The artist Vincent Van Gogh moved to Ramsgate in April 1876, at age 23. He boarded at 11 Spencer Square, which is identified by a blue wall plaque. He obtained work as a teacher at a local school in Royal Road, where he received his post. In one of his letters to his brother Theo, he described his surroundings: "There’s a harbour full of all kinds of ships, closed in by stone jetties running into the sea on which one can walk. And further out one sees the sea in its natural state, and that’s beautiful."

In 1901, an electric tram service, one of the few inter-urban tramways in Britain, was introduced on the Isle of Thanet. The towns of Ramsgate, Margate and Broadstairs were linked by 11 miles of track. In 1915–1916, early aircraft began to use the open farmland at Manston as a site for emergency landings. The location near the Kent coast gave Manston some advantages over the other previously established aerodromes. During the First World War, Ramsgate was the target of bombing raids by Zeppelin airships. By 1917 the Royal Flying Corps was well established and taking an active part in the defence of Britain. As RAF Manston, the aerodrome played an important role in the Second World War. It is now called Kent International Airport, but is currently not operational.

As the Second World War approached, Ramsgate Borough Council embarked on plans to create a network of Deep Shelter tunnels linked to a former railway tunnel which would provide shelter for 60,000 people. The tunnels were opened on 1 June 1939. 75 years later, in 2014, a part of this network was opened to visitors.

In October 1939, the Royal Navy established a Coastal Forces base at Ramsgate called HMS Fervent, which operated Motor Torpedo Boats, Motor Gun Boats and Motor Launches until September 1945. From 27 May 1940, Ramsgate harbour was the main assembly point for the build-up of small craft needed for Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk. Once the evacuation was under way, Ramsgate became the second-busiest port after Dover, and just under 43,000 men passed through the port, transported onwards by 82 special trains.

Today Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline, particularly Ramsgate Main Sands, which was awarded a Blue Flag in 2015. Ramsgate's wartime deep shelter tunnels are open to the public for tours, which have been running since 2014. The local council publishes a website specifically aimed at tourists visiting Ramsgate and neighbouring towns. There is an annual regatta event based in Ramsgate during the summer, and Ramsgate carnival is an annual parade that also takes place during the summer months. Other events include the annual Addington Street Fair and the French Market.

We are currently out and about finding Havens and talking to sailors like you. By popular user request, we have posted this marina in advance of our normal production. Hence we have adapted wikipedia data in this ‘Why visit here’ section. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this text under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.


What facilities are available?
Water and electricity are readily available. The Marina features a modern amenity block with free showers, toilets and coin operated launderette facilities. Wireless internet connection is available throughout the marina berthing areas. Recycling points are located at the base of West Pier and the entrance to the boat park.

Petrol and diesel are available from the fuel barge 365 days a year. There are full repair facilities ashore and afloat, including a 40 tonne boat hoist in the boatyard that offers a wash off service. Chandlery, sail loft, slipways, boat park and brokerage are all on hand.

The hospitable Royal Temple Yacht Club (591766) overlooks the marina and they are situated 5 minutes' from the town centre where all amenities are available. This includes excellent public transport links. Bus services are provided by Stagecoach East Kent and also serve Broadstairs, Canterbury, Sandwich and Margate. Ramsgate railway station is situated at the top of the town near the parish of St Lawrence. A new high-speed train service to London, on High Speed 1 (HS1) the UK’s first high-speed rail line, runs between Kent and London’s St Pancras station. The journey time from Ramsgate to the new St Pancras terminal, with excellent onward transport links, is 1 hour 16 minutes.

Other trains run from Ramsgate to London Charing Cross and London Victoria. Commuting time to the capital on these lines is approximately 1 hour 50 minutes. Trains from Ramsgate are routed via Margate, Chatham and Bromley South, or via Canterbury West or Dover Priory and Ashford International. Ramsgate railway station is operated by Southeastern.


Any security concerns?
The Marina is covered by 24 hour security manning and CCTV surveillance.



With thanks to:
eOceanic and UK Hydrographic Office


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




Ramsgate Harbour, Kent, England
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Ramsgate Harbour's pretty quay
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Ramsgate Harbour Inner Harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Ramsgate Harbour Inner Harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Yacht entering the West Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Ramsgate Sands immediatly northeast of the harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur
About Ramsgate

Ramsgate began as a fishing and farming hamlet. The Christian missionary St. Augustine, sent by Pope Gregory the Great, landed near Ramsgate in 597AD. The town is home to the Shrine of St Augustine.

The earliest reference to the town is in the Kent Hundred Rolls of 1274-5, both as Remmesgate (in the local personal name of ‘Christina de Remmesgate’) and Remisgat (with reference to the town). The names Ramisgate and Raunsgate appear in the parish of St. Laurence records circa 1290. These are all derived from late Anglo-Saxon ‘Hremmes’ from earlier ‘Hræfnes’ (raven’s) and ‘geat’ (gate), with reference to the gap in the cliffs. In 1357, the area became known as Ramesgate. Ramsgate was a member of the Confederation of Cinque Ports, under the 'Limb' of Sandwich, Kent.

The construction of Ramsgate Harbour began in 1749 and was completed in about 1850. The harbour has the distinction of being the only Royal Harbour in the United Kingdom. Because of its proximity to mainland Europe, Ramsgate was a chief embarkation point both during the Napoleonic Wars and for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.

The Official Illustrated Guide to South-Eastern and North and Mid-Kent Railways (June 1863) by George Measom describes Ramsgate like this: 'It is impossible to speak too favourably of this first rate town, its glorious sands, its bathing, its hotels, libraries, churches, etc. etc. not forgetting its bracing climate... The streets of Ramsgate are well paved or macadamed and brilliantly lighted with gas.'

The architect A W Pugin and his sons lived in Ramsgate and built several important buildings there, including St Augustine's Church, The Grange, St Augustine's Abbey, and The Granville Hotel.

The artist Vincent Van Gogh moved to Ramsgate in April 1876, at age 23. He boarded at 11 Spencer Square, which is identified by a blue wall plaque. He obtained work as a teacher at a local school in Royal Road, where he received his post. In one of his letters to his brother Theo, he described his surroundings: "There’s a harbour full of all kinds of ships, closed in by stone jetties running into the sea on which one can walk. And further out one sees the sea in its natural state, and that’s beautiful."

In 1901, an electric tram service, one of the few inter-urban tramways in Britain, was introduced on the Isle of Thanet. The towns of Ramsgate, Margate and Broadstairs were linked by 11 miles of track. In 1915–1916, early aircraft began to use the open farmland at Manston as a site for emergency landings. The location near the Kent coast gave Manston some advantages over the other previously established aerodromes. During the First World War, Ramsgate was the target of bombing raids by Zeppelin airships. By 1917 the Royal Flying Corps was well established and taking an active part in the defence of Britain. As RAF Manston, the aerodrome played an important role in the Second World War. It is now called Kent International Airport, but is currently not operational.

As the Second World War approached, Ramsgate Borough Council embarked on plans to create a network of Deep Shelter tunnels linked to a former railway tunnel which would provide shelter for 60,000 people. The tunnels were opened on 1 June 1939. 75 years later, in 2014, a part of this network was opened to visitors.

In October 1939, the Royal Navy established a Coastal Forces base at Ramsgate called HMS Fervent, which operated Motor Torpedo Boats, Motor Gun Boats and Motor Launches until September 1945. From 27 May 1940, Ramsgate harbour was the main assembly point for the build-up of small craft needed for Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk. Once the evacuation was under way, Ramsgate became the second-busiest port after Dover, and just under 43,000 men passed through the port, transported onwards by 82 special trains.

Today Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline, particularly Ramsgate Main Sands, which was awarded a Blue Flag in 2015. Ramsgate's wartime deep shelter tunnels are open to the public for tours, which have been running since 2014. The local council publishes a website specifically aimed at tourists visiting Ramsgate and neighbouring towns. There is an annual regatta event based in Ramsgate during the summer, and Ramsgate carnival is an annual parade that also takes place during the summer months. Other events include the annual Addington Street Fair and the French Market.

We are currently out and about finding Havens and talking to sailors like you. By popular user request, we have posted this marina in advance of our normal production. Hence we have adapted wikipedia data in this ‘Why visit here’ section. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this text under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Dover - 8.3 miles SSW
Folkestone - 10.8 miles SSW
Rye Harbour - 21.2 miles SW
Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 32.4 miles SW
Newhaven - 37.9 miles WSW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Bude Haven - 140.9 miles W
Mousehole - 170.4 miles WSW
Newlyn - 170.3 miles WSW
Penzance Harbour - 169.8 miles WSW
Saint Michael's Mount - 168.6 miles WSW

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Ramsgate.





















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