England Ireland Find Havens
England Ireland Find Routes
Boat
Maintenance
Comfort
Operations
Safety
Other








Newlyn Harbour is situated on the west side of Penzance Bay and on England's southwest coast, about fifteen miles northwest of Lizard Point and seven miles northeast of Land's End. This is principally a fishing port but it accommodates leisure craft inside and it is also possible to anchor outside of the harbour walls during good conditions.

The harbour provides good protection except during strong southeasterly conditions which send an uncomfortable surge into the harbour. Newlyn is the localities port of refuge offering safe access at all states of the tide, night or day, and all reasonable conditions. The only exception is during strong south round to east winds when its shallow waters can prove challenging. The harbour may still be approached during these conditions but only as close to high water as possible.



2 comments
Keyfacts for Newlyn
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Anchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 6 or more from ESE, SE and SSE.Note: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2.5 metres (8.2 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
April 24th 2019

Summary

A good location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Anchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Dangerous to enter when it is Beaufort force 6 or more from ESE, SE and SSE.Note: harbour fees may be charged



HM  +44 1736 362523      info@newlynharbour.com     newlynharbour.com/      Ch.9, 12 & 16 [Newlyn Harbour]
Position and approaches
Expand to new tab or fullscreen

Haven position

50° 6.182' N, 005° 32.564' W

This is the position of the light at the head of Newlyn's South Pier, Fl.5s10m9M.

What is the initial fix?

The following Newlyn Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
50° 6.182' N, 005° 31.618' W
This is a ½ mile south of The Gra Rock and a little over that distance due east of the harbour entrance.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern England’s coastal overview from Lizard Point to Land's End Route location
  • From the southeast, keep clear of the Mountamopus Shoal that is located about 4½ miles from Newlyn and marked by a cardinal.

    • From the southwest, avoid Low Lee Rock also marked by a cardinal.
        Vessel approaching from Penzance and Saint Michael's Mount should avoid The Gear rock.
      • Approach from east steering for the lighthouse at the head of the South Pier Fl.5s9M.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Newlyn for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Penzance Harbour - 0.6 miles NNE
  2. Mousehole - 0.8 miles S
  3. Saint Michael's Mount - 1.7 miles ENE
  4. Porthleven Harbour - 5.5 miles E
  5. Mullion Cove & Porth Mellin - 7.5 miles ESE
  6. Kynance Cove - 8.9 miles ESE
  7. Cadgwith - 9.7 miles ESE
  8. Helford River - 9.9 miles E
  9. Gillan Creek - 10.8 miles E
  10. Coverack - 11.1 miles ESE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Penzance Harbour - 0.6 miles NNE
  2. Mousehole - 0.8 miles S
  3. Saint Michael's Mount - 1.7 miles ENE
  4. Porthleven Harbour - 5.5 miles E
  5. Mullion Cove & Porth Mellin - 7.5 miles ESE
  6. Kynance Cove - 8.9 miles ESE
  7. Cadgwith - 9.7 miles ESE
  8. Helford River - 9.9 miles E
  9. Gillan Creek - 10.8 miles E
  10. Coverack - 11.1 miles ESE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search

Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

Expand to new tab or fullscreen



What's the story here?
Newlyn Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Newlyn Harbour is situated on the west side of Penzance Bay, within a cove known as Gwavas Lake. The small port is formed by two long piers, north and south, that converge at right angles to form a northeast facing entrance. It is marked by a prominent metal lighthouse standing on the head of the South Pier. Inside the entrance, the rectangular shaped harbour runs in a northwesterly direction and is divided in half by the Mary Williams Pier which has fishing boat berths on both sides. Within Mary Williams Pier are two pontoons with finger berths used by local boats and fishing vessels. Newlyn's principal industry is fishing and with more than 100 fishing vessels operating from the port that ranges from 6 to 37 metres in size. It is one of the largest in the UK and it takes in one of the richest hauls. Like most of Cornwall's coastal towns, it is increasingly becoming a popular holiday destination, with many pubs and restaurants. As such there are a wide variety of yachts and pleasure boats in the harbour area.


The southwest corner and the area inside the pontoons dries
Image: Michael Harpur


The harbour can handle visiting boats up to 24 metres LOA with drafts of up to 5.5 metres at MHWS and 5.2 metres at MHWN. Sections of the harbour have a maintained depths of from 1.9 to 2.4 metres but a large portion of it dries, and particularly so the southwest corner and inside the pontoons. The harbour authority is 'Newlyn Pier and Harbour Commissioners' who give priority to the fishing fleet. However, they do their best to accommodate leisure craft and, as this is not their priority, it is important to contact them in advance of any intended visit VHF channels 9, 12, and 16 [Newlyn Harbour], Landline+44 1736 362523, E-mailinfo@newlynharbour.com, Websitewww.newlynharbour.com. The harbour office hours are 0800 to 1700 weekdays and 0800 to 1200 Saturday.


Visitors are typically accommodated on the outer fingers of the pontoon
Image: Michael Harpur


Upon contact, the harbourmaster will provide details on berthing possibilities as well as vessel movements and general navigation matters in or near the harbours of Newlyn and Penzance. When available, berths are only for an overnight stay and are typically on the first 3 - 4 fingers of the pontoon that lies southward of Mary Williams Pier. These all have a maintained depth of 2 metres LAT. Charges per night [2019] for up to 8m £20 | 8m to 12m £25 | 12m and over £35 with multihulls attracting an additional 50% fee. It is important to note that preference is given to fishing vessels and yachtsmen may be asked to move in order to accommodate the very busy harbour operations.


How to get in?
Newlyn Harbour is situated on the west side of Penzance Bay,
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use southwestern England’s coastal overview from Lizard Point to Land's End Route location for seaward approaches. Keep a sharp eye out for pot marker buoys throughout this area.

South Eastern Approach The primary dangers for vessels approaching from the southeast is the Mountamopus Shoal located about 4½ miles from Newlyn and a mile southward from Cuddan Point. It is a rocky shoal patch which contains portions with as little as 1.4 metres of water over it and is marked by a south cardinal, Q(6)+LFl.15s, on its southern edge.


Fishing boat passing Low Lee Rock east cardinal Newlyn bound
Image: Nilfanion via CC ASA 4.0


South Western Approach Vessels approaching from the southwest should avoid Low Lee Rock, with 2.1 metres of water over it. It lies a ⅓ of a mile east by northeastward of Penlee Point and has the 'Low Lee' east cardinal marker buoy moored about 150 metres eastward of the rock, Q(3)10s. Likewise Carn Base, a ⅓ of a mile northwestward with 2.3 metres of water over it.


The Gear rock isolated danger beacon as seen from the shore at high water
Image: Michael Harpur


North Eastern Approach Vessel approaching from Penzance and Saint Michael's Mount will have The Gear rock very much in their path. The Gear dries to 1.9 metres and lies ¾ of a mile northwest of the harbour. It is marked by an isolated danger beacon Fl(2)10s and at night the green sector of the North Pier light (238°-248°) clears The Gear. Those intending on hugging the shore from Penzance should note Dog Rock off the Promanade with 0.3 metres of water over it. It lies inside of The Gear and ⅓ of a mile to the northeast of the entrance to the harbour.


Newlyn Harbour as seen from the southeast
Image: Michael Harpur


Initial fix location From the initial fix steer for the prominent metal tower that stands on the head of the South Pier ¾ of a mile west. The tower is 10 metres high, coloured white with a red bottom band and at night it exhibits a light, Fl.5s, that can be seen for 9 miles.


Newlyn Harbour as seen from the south
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Anchor a couple of hundred metres outside the harbour walls in Gwavas Lake according to wind and conditions. Keep well clear of the harbour fairway and carry a bright riding light as there are frequent fishing boat movements at night and any moderate riding light will struggle to be seen against the background shore lights of the town.


Saint Michael's Mount seen through the entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


Alternatively, turn into the harbour's 47 metres wide northwest facing entrance and berth as directed by the harbourmaster. There is a speed limit of 3 kn within the harbour. The usual berths are at the end of the Newlyn harbour pontoons which are best addressed by steering for the head of the Mary Williams Pier after the 1.5-metre patch extending from North Pier has been passed. A red spar buoy will be seen in the water and this marks the end of a slip. Keep well clear of the area to southwest and south of Mary Williams Pier as it all dries at low water.


Why visit here?
Newlyn, first recorded as Nulyn in 1279 then Lulyn in 1290, takes its name from the Cornish words lu meaning 'fleet' and 'lynn' or 'lydn' meaning 'pool'. Conjoined as 'Lulyn' it means 'pool for the fleet of boats'. This perfectly describe the use of Gwavas Lake which is an area of relatively calm water in Mounts Bay situated outside the current harbour area of Newlyn. The name Gwavas is itself a conjunction derived from the two Cornish words of 'gwaf' meaning winter, and 'bos' meaning abode.


Boat Adrift by Charles Napier Hemy
Image: Public Domain


The natural protection Gwavas Lake afforded led local fishermen to use the area as their preferred landing site and a place where a boat could safely be left afloat. This first user would have most likely have been seasonal fishing by farmers and smallholders from the vicinity. As with many other coastal Cornish villages, it probably began as a 'cellar settlement' where a cluster of fish cellars and net lofts developed around the landing beach. In the case of Newlyn, it was the conjunction of three small fishing settlements that were previously separated by bodies of water entering the harbour area. Tolcarne, derived from Tal Carn, meaning 'brow of the rocks', Street-an-Nowan, from Steet-an-Awan meaning 'river street' as the Newlyn River passes through the town to the sea, and Trewarveneth, meaning 'farm or manor on the hill'.

Hauling in Lobster Pots by Charles Napier Hemy
Image: Public Domain
None of these settlements came to be recorded in the 1086 Domesday as all were within the manor of Alverton which was the original manorial centre of the area. The name Alward and tun, being a personal name combined with the word for a 'town' to indicate it was a Saxon called Alward’s settlement. The manor was recorded as the largest of the whole Land’s End peninsula, extending from Penzance to Mousehole. But alas for Alward he was soon to be dispossessed by the Norman conquerors. During Alward’s time and that of the new Norman lord's, the settlements, landing rights and most of the properties of the area were owned by the Manor of Alverton.

The first recorded of Newlyn’s quay comes from 1437 when indulgences were offered by the church in return for contributions towards its 'repairing and maintaining of a certain quay or jetty for forty boats'. The quay was originally constructed in the reign of Henry VI and renewed in the time of James I. John Leland, observed that Newlyn was in 1540... 'a pretty fisher town in the west part of Mount’s Bay lying hard by the shore'. But remarks of Newlyn are scarce as it remained largely anonymous in the historic records until the 18th-century. Until the fishing of pilchards gained prominence and became an industry the size and status of the harbour remained inferior to those of its near neighbours. In fact one of the harbour's most important connections with history was entirely overlooked for four centuries and it largely remains so to this day. This occurred in 1620 when the Mayflower visited.


Unloading the boats, Newlyn Harbour by Harold Harvey
Image: Public Domain


In August of that year the ships Speedwell and the Mayflower set sail from Southampton bound for Virginia. However, the Speedwell was not a good ship and it soon started to take on water forcing both vessels to run to Plymouth for repairs. At this time an outbreak of cholera was sweeping through the city so they made a hurried effort of patching up the Speedwell and were on their way as quickly as they could be. The hasty repairs proved unreliable and by the time they reached the Scillies the Speedwell was taking on water again. With the uncertain seas of winter approaching it was decided that Speedwell was unseaworthy, not capable of the crossing and should return for further repair work. Some of the passengers from the Speedwell then boarded the Mayflower and fearing the fresh water may have been contaminated in Plymouth they thought they should refresh it. For this reason, and some last minute supplies, Mayflower came into Newlyn. Since then people have been under the misguided belief that it was Plymouth, on 16 September 1620, that the Mayflower departed for the New World. But it was in truth from Newlyn’s old quay.

Between The Tides by Walter Langley 1901
Image: Public Domain
Newlyn finally took off in the 18th-century when it became a centre of the seine fishery, and the town prospered behind it, landing, curing and marketing pilchards. The Pilchard industry was in the hands of merchants and dealers and required significant infrastructure investment in fishing equipment and substantial 'industrial' fish cellars. It is believed that Newlyn had eight or nine seines in operation during the second half of the 18th-century. Locals later built luggers to pursue pilchards with nets, 'drifting' or 'driving' as it was called, which led to the arrival of fish merchants in the port. By the middle of the 19th-century, Newlyn held more drift boats than any other Cornish port and the Newlyn, or Mount's Bay, lugger was a distinctive design distinguishable from those of St Ives or Falmouth.

A guidebook from this time described Newlyn as a 'colony of fishermen, with narrow paved lanes, glistening with pilchard scales in the season – with external staircases, and picturesque interiors'. Growth was spurred on from the 1830s by the increased access to markets, especially London and Bristol that steam-packets calling at Hayle enabled. In 1866 Penzance was finally linked to London on a through line providing yet another boost to Newlyn. For the first time the railway made it possible to transport fresh fish to London and other major markets in a day. In April 1868 the West Briton reported… 'All day long the fish were being carried from Newlyn to Penzance, and kept the roads, streets and railway station very busy... No less than five thousand baskets of fish were rapidly despatched by three specials, and the mail train, on Friday; and mackerel which that morning swam in shoals seven or eight miles S.W. of the dreaded Wolf Rock were sold in Billingsgate early on Saturday morning.'


The Old Slip Newlyn by Harold Harvey 1908
Image: Public Domain


Before the 19th-century the name of Newlyn referred only to the literal 'fleet pool' anchoring area near the old quay. By the latter end of the 19th-century, the Old Quay was enclosing too small a haven for the level of activity foe was a prodigious fishing port. To help improve accessibility and safety it was itself enclosed by the Victorian piers. The South Pier was completed in 1885 and the North Pier was built in the following year and extended in 1892. This, in turn, helped to boost Newlyn’s fortunes as commodities such as coal could now be exported from Cornwall’s shores. This century also saw the extraction of copper from Penlee Quarry and it was shipped from the port which became known as Newlyn.


Never Morning Wore To Evening by Walter Langley 1894
Image: Public Domain
The brusque fishing trade brought opportunistic east coast fishing fleets into Newlyn. Termed 'Yorkies' by the locals, their indifference to the observance of the Sabbath day lead to large scale unrest in 1896. The strictly Methodist Newlyn men would not fish on a Sunday which left the Monday market wide open to the less pious Lowestoft fishermen. This volatile situation exploded in May of that year where the local fishermen retaliated by seizing non-Cornish vessels and throwing their catch overboard. Thee days of rioting and violence ensued and the upheaval, called the 'Newlyn Riots', was only finally quelled by the combined forces; the police, the army and the crew of a Royal Navy destroyer who entered the fray.


Newlyn, Catching Up With The Cornish Telegraph by Walter Langley
Image: Public Domain
Most unlikely, it was a colony of artists founded by Stanhope Forbes, that begun to keep some of the town's more unruly youngsters out of mischief. The 'Newlyn School of Art' came to established itself here around the 1880s when the artists were drawn to the picturesque appearance of the village, with its quays and harbour, and the grandeur of the cliffs and moorland scenery towards Land's End. The key element, however, was the clear local light that is created by a southerly ocean-facing peninsula three parts surrounded by the sea. At first, the greyness in the atmosphere helped their depiction of subtleties in tone as part of their creed being the subordination of colour to tone-gradation at the time. It was in this way similar to Barbizon School in France, where artists fled Paris to paint in a more pure setting emphasizing natural light.


Departure Of The Fleet by Walter Langley 1896
Image: Public Domain


In later times, the element of a common ideal tended to disappear, but the interest of the 'Newlyn School' attracted a regular art-colony, who in various ways assimilated and expressed the picturesque influences of the place. Its rise was so rapid that, in 1895, the Cornish philanthropist John Passmore Edwards built and gave the Newlyn Art Gallery to the town's artists. Many of their works were inspired by the day to day life of the harbour, fishing, the comings and goings of the fleet and the anxious wait of families who watched for the boats to return safely home. This has left a legacy of art that records the comings and goings, fishing activities and people of this harbour during the late 19th-century and early 20th like few others.

Newlyn artisan copperwork
Image: Public Domain
Alongside the men of brush and paint there came the mastercraftsman J.D. Mackenzie who in 1890 was more interested in the copper being mined from Penlee Quarry. He commences a class of artistic metalwork and was joined two years later by John Pearson, a member of the Guild of Handicraft. Mackenzie opened Newlyn Art Industries in a large granite warehouse from which developed the famous Newlyn Copper. Although similar to mainstream copper work it developed local themes and distinctive identity of its own. As poor weather and seasonal fluctuations brought enforced periods of inactivity, local fishermen trained to create domestic and decorative copperware. They created some of the most outstanding work in the arts and crafts tradition that is now highly prized by collectors, all as an alternative source of income.


Newlyn, or Mount's Bay, Lugger in the harbour today
Image: Michael Harpur


Until the 1960s, the main catch at Newlyn remained its pilchards. But by then the shoals had largely disappeared and had become became less popular with consumers incomes declined. During the 1970s, mackerel helped to improve the fortunes of the harbour, leading to the opening of the Mary Williams Pier by The Queen in 1980.


The old pier where the Mayflower's pilgrims would have landed
Image: Michael Harpur


Today, Newlyn is very much a working port and one of the UK's premier fishing ports. Newlyn has the second largest fleet in the country and landing fish to the value of £20 million annually it brings in the largest value catch in all of the UK. Copper production was re-established by Michael Johnson in 2004 who has been recognised as the leading artisan in the UK. Bespoke copper, bronze and brass work from the finest industrial arts coppersmiths is once again being produced here making art as important to Newlyn’s future as it was to its illustrious past.

The old pier where the Mayflower's pilgrims would have landed
Image: Michael Harpur


There is ample opportunity to see this at the copperworks and at The Newlyn Art Gallery that exhibits cutting edge contemporary art. The Newlyn School of Art offers inspiring courses and painting holidays to this day. The harbour's South Pier also holds a place in national Maritime importance. It carries the Ordnance Survey's Datum point from which all heights in the United Kingdom are measured. A brass bolt on the pier is the benchmark for the whole of the United Kingdom and all heights are referenced to this point. You can still step onto the Old Quay today. A plaque there reads… To the memory of Bill Best Harris 1914 – 1987 Historian and son of Plymouth whose researches indicated that the MAYFLOWER 16 – 8 – 1620 docked at the Old Quay Newlyn for water and supplies making it the last port of call in England The water supply at Plymouth being the cause of fever and cholera in the city Let debate begin'.


Boats alongside the visitor pontoon
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating point of view, being accessible at all states of the tide, it is a popular stopover point for boats en route for the Isles of Scilly or for crossing the English Channel to Brittany. It is also the only harbour of refuge in Mounts Bay and should it get rough suddenly with a groundswell running or with onshore winds, no attempt should be made to enter any of the bay's other harbours, Newlyn is the only safe option. Its all-tide access is particularly useful for passage making so that it is possible to make the most of the tides or intent on an early start. Likewise, it makes a great location to add to the provisions just like the Mayflower did four centuries ago. With its authentic charm and ambitious spirit, Newlyn is well worth a visit of itself.


What facilities are available?
Water, showers and toilets by arrangement at Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, on the North Pier who welcome all mariners. Bins on quays. Diesel fuel from North Quay pipeline, minimum of 50 gallons or litres. Petrol by jerry and camping gas at Penzance. Slipway for trailer launches on Harbour Road with prior consultation with Harbour Commissioners.

Newlyn and Penzance have a good number of engineering and marine specialists, primarily serving the fishing fleet. They can usually take care of most boating issues, and the Harbourmaster can generally advise. The Harbour Office is situated on the right-hand side approaching the entrance to North Quay. The harbour only offers a drying-out facility in emergencies.

Newlyn has a post office, laundry facilities, banks, supermarkets, shops, pubs and restaurants, which are easily accessible from the harbour. Being a working port its pubs and restaurants all serve fresh catch of the day. Penzance can be reached on foot from Newlyn along a wide promenade and can also be reached by bus and taxi. Penzance has a mainline train station and buses to Newlyn and the rest of Cornwall.


With thanks to:
eOceanic


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




Newlyn Harbour, Cornwall, England.
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Newlyn Harbour entrance as seen from inside
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


RNLI lifeboat is stationed in Newlyn Harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


The old pier where the Mayflower's pilgrims would have landed
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


The old pier where the Mayflower's pilgrims would have landed
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


The town of Newlyn overlooking the pontoons
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Newly or Mounts Bay Lugger
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Newlyn or Mounts Bay Lugger in the harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Newlyn or Mounts Bay Lugger in the harbour
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur




Newlyn Aerial



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:


Richard Gurney wrote this review on May 17th 2019:

There are NO DOGS allowed in the harbour area (whether by land or sea); this is due to the fact that the harbour is mainly involved in the food (fish) industry and there is a local bye law banning them.

Average Rating: *****


David Lovelock wrote this review on Jul 18th 2019:

The very friendly and helpful harbourmaster will usually arrange for portable diesel containers to be filled. There is water available on the visitors' pontoon. Berthing for visiting yachts is limited and it is wise to contact the harbourmaster (most almanacs have his mobile phone number) before approaching the harbour. At least one berth is reserved for boats under 9m LOA. If you have any dogs or cats on board you will be refused entry, no exceptions.

Average Rating: Unrated

Please log in to leave a review of this haven.



Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.