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Cooncrome Harbour (Cuas Crom)

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Overview





Cooncrome Harbour is situated on the southwest coast of Ireland upon the southern entrance to Dingle Bay. It is a remote beach at the head of a rocky sea bight with a historic pier and slip.

Cooncrome Harbour is situated on the southwest coast of Ireland upon the southern entrance to Dingle Bay. It is a remote beach at the head of a rocky sea bight with a historic pier and slip.

Cooncrome Harbour offers an exposed anchorage that might be used in good conditions where the vessel may be watched from the shore. Access is very straightforward at any state of the tide during daylight as the bay is clean and there are no outlying dangers.



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Keyfacts for Cooncrome Harbour (Cuas Crom)
Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
4 metres (13.12 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
2 stars: Exposed; unattended vessels should be watched from the shore and a comfortable overnight stay is unlikely.



Last modified
March 29th 2022

Summary

An exposed location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Slipway availableMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 57.994' N, 010° 15.921' W

In the neck at the head of the bay, close northeast of the pierhead.

What is the initial fix?

The following Cooncrome Harbour Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
51° 58.307' N, 010° 16.458' W
Te is in the middle of the outer entrance to Cooncrome Harbour.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.

  • Take a central approach up the outer bay.

  • Stay middle-to-the-eastern side up the narrow neck at the head as the western side dries beyond the pierhead.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cooncrome Harbour (Cuas Crom) for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Cahersiveen - 1.6 nautical miles SE
  2. Knightstown - 2.5 nautical miles SSW
  3. Portmagee - 6.1 nautical miles SW
  4. Kells Bay - 7 nautical miles ENE
  5. Ballinskellig Bay - 9.3 nautical miles S
  6. Ventry Harbour - 9.7 nautical miles NNW
  7. Dingle Harbour - 10.2 nautical miles N
  8. Great Blasket Island - 12.4 nautical miles NW
  9. Darrynane Harbour - 13.1 nautical miles SSE
  10. West Cove - 14.2 nautical miles SSE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Cahersiveen - 1.6 miles SE
  2. Knightstown - 2.5 miles SSW
  3. Portmagee - 6.1 miles SW
  4. Kells Bay - 7 miles ENE
  5. Ballinskellig Bay - 9.3 miles S
  6. Ventry Harbour - 9.7 miles NNW
  7. Dingle Harbour - 10.2 miles N
  8. Great Blasket Island - 12.4 miles NW
  9. Darrynane Harbour - 13.1 miles SSE
  10. West Cove - 14.2 miles SSE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Cooncrome Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Cooncrome Harbour is a deep rocky bay situated immediately within the southern entrance to Dingle Bay. It is located in the dip that lies to the northeast of Killelan Mountain, which rises to 276 metres a ½ mile within Doulos Head, and to the southwest of Slievagh Mountain, rising to 206 metres 2½ miles to the northwest of the former. A rocky bay separates these two mountains with a Cooncrome Harbour set into a gully that runs nearly southward into the land in its southeast corner. The harbour has a substantive old pier and a slipway, beach and car park at its head.


The slip at the head of Cooncrome Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


The bay offers only fair-weather and settled condition protection owing to wave refraction that occurs around the headland. It is best not to venture too far owing to uncertainty regarding the ground holding which is best tested when visited.


How to get in?
Cooncrome Harbour as seen from the south
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use Ireland’s coastal overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location for seaward approaches. Follow the rocky sea cliffs around from Doulos Head around to where the bay leading to Cooncrome Harbour opens about 2 miles east by northeast. The outer bay is almost a ½ a mile wide through which a central path is deep and clear of outlying dangers. The entrance to the harbour in its southeast corner then narrows to 150 metres wide.


The old pier extending from the western shore
Image: Michael Harpur


The best water is then found on the middle-to-east side of the cut as it dries beyond the head of the pier along the eastern shoreline.


Land on the slip or on the beach at low water
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Anchor according to draught and conditions to the northeast of the pierhead. Land by tender on the slip. The beach is stony, so those landing on it will have to pick their way across the rocks at high water but at low water, it exposes a hard sand bottom.


Why visit here?
Cooncrome Harbour, first recorded in 1654 as 'Countrohinna', takes its name from the Irish 'Cuas Chrom' by which its beach is more commonly known if slightly shortened to 'Cuas Crom' and pronounced 'Coosecrown'. The name is derived from the Irish words 'cuas' meaning 'cove, cavity or caves' and 'cuan' meaning 'bay, harbour, recess'. The name here is believed to mean 'bay of the caves' as Cooncrome and the neighbouring Coonanna harbours have an abundance of sea caves along its rocky shores.


The pier dates back to the late 1880's
Image: Michael Harpur


The old pier seen in this isolated little bay was built to support the first transatlantic telegraphic cables. Prior to the telegraphic cable, it took approximately two weeks, weather permitting, for a message to reach North America from Europe as all communications were sent via boat. The reply then took a further two weeks to return, weather permitting. The idea of laying a transatlantic cable was first proposed in 1845, and Atlantic Telegraph Company began the process in 1855 with the SS Niagara and H.M.S. Agamemnon. The first attempt to lay the transatlantic cable from the White Strand, on the opposite side of the peninsula, ended in failure in 1857. This happened when the cable snapped in a storm at the edge of the continental shelf, 300 miles out to sea, nearly taking with it H.M.S. Agamemnon. This was followed in 1858 by a briefly successful cable to Knightstown.


The view out from the root of the pier
Image: Michael Harpur


It wasn’t until 1866, that a cable was successfully laid that revolutionised international communications overnight. This was between Valentia's Foilhommerum Bay to Heart's Content, Newfoundland. The cable was under the auspices of the newly-formed Anglo-American Telegraph Company, which replaced the Atlantic Telegraph Company in early 1866.


The view seaward from the head of the pier
Image: Michael Harpur


But by 1887 the transatlantic telegraph cables at Foilhommerum Bay were being damaged by weather and corrosion caused by copper ore in the seabed. In that year the Anglo-American Telegraph Company, using the Cable Ship Minia, diverted their three functioning cables of 1873, '74 and '80 from the bay to enter Cooncrome Harbour and set up a telegraph hut to connect them to the landline. This went southwest for 3 km via a trench to the original White Strand landing point where they continued underwater to the Knightstown Cable Station building on Valentia Island. But over time Cooncrome's rocky shore proved too harsh for the cables and, by 1898, only one cable remained here. The others having been diverted directly through to Valentia Harbour and into Knightstown.


Cuas Crom has a lovely shelter beach from which to swim
Image: Michael Harpur


It was not only the natural environment that threatened the critical and newly established infrastructure. In 1867 a green flag raised on Ballycarberry Castle signalled the Iveragh Fenians to assemble and join a long-planned Fenian Rising. Their intention was to attack the Cahersiveen Constabulary Barracks and to destroy the Cable Station at Foilhommerum on Valentia. As it happens HMS Gladiator was in the bay and it dissuaded the rebels from attacking the cable station. Instead, the assembled Fenians marched towards Killarney but before reaching there they heard that the rising had been deferred and they dispersed. Many of which were rounded up and jailed. Seeing the exposure the new Constabulary Barracks in Cahersiveen was built in the 1870s to deter any further attack on the Cable Station at Knightstown.


Ballycarbery Castle today
Image: Michael G Kenny via CC BY-SA 2.0


The Anglo-American Telegraph Company would become the Western Union International which in 1911 took over the Valentia cables. In 1934 all their functioning cables were diverted to Lacknabau on the north side of Valentia and Cooncrome Harbour ceased to be used. These were then routed to the Knightstown station in an underground trench. Western Union International continued to operate from Valentia Island until it finally terminated its cable operations in 1966.


Leacanabuaile Stone Fort with Cahergall and Ballycarbery Castle in the distance
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating perspective, Cooncrome Harbour is not the best anchorage due to the ocean wrapping around Doulus Head and sending refracting waves along this coast. But in settled weather, it is a lovely spot very far from the tourist crowds during the season. It is the perfect place for a family boat to anchor off and have a swim as the water here is surprisingly warm and clear and the beach is beautifully enclosed. It is also a short 10-minute walk, (850 metres) to the two wonderful historic ring forts of Leacanabuaile and Cahergal set on crowning windswept bluffs overlooking the river Cahersiveen. These are covered in the Cahersiveen Click to view haven entry from which it is a much further walk, 40 min (3.7 km) walk each way. On a fine day to anchor up have a swim and a visit to these forts would be a spectacular experience.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities here save for the pier, slip and road access. There are toilets and changing rooms in the car park above.


With thanks to:
eOceanic Research



About Cooncrome Harbour (Cuas Crom)

Cooncrome Harbour, first recorded in 1654 as 'Countrohinna', takes its name from the Irish 'Cuas Chrom' by which its beach is more commonly known if slightly shortened to 'Cuas Crom' and pronounced 'Coosecrown'. The name is derived from the Irish words 'cuas' meaning 'cove, cavity or caves' and 'cuan' meaning 'bay, harbour, recess'. The name here is believed to mean 'bay of the caves' as Cooncrome and the neighbouring Coonanna harbours have an abundance of sea caves along its rocky shores.


The pier dates back to the late 1880's
Image: Michael Harpur


The old pier seen in this isolated little bay was built to support the first transatlantic telegraphic cables. Prior to the telegraphic cable, it took approximately two weeks, weather permitting, for a message to reach North America from Europe as all communications were sent via boat. The reply then took a further two weeks to return, weather permitting. The idea of laying a transatlantic cable was first proposed in 1845, and Atlantic Telegraph Company began the process in 1855 with the SS Niagara and H.M.S. Agamemnon. The first attempt to lay the transatlantic cable from the White Strand, on the opposite side of the peninsula, ended in failure in 1857. This happened when the cable snapped in a storm at the edge of the continental shelf, 300 miles out to sea, nearly taking with it H.M.S. Agamemnon. This was followed in 1858 by a briefly successful cable to Knightstown.


The view out from the root of the pier
Image: Michael Harpur


It wasn’t until 1866, that a cable was successfully laid that revolutionised international communications overnight. This was between Valentia's Foilhommerum Bay to Heart's Content, Newfoundland. The cable was under the auspices of the newly-formed Anglo-American Telegraph Company, which replaced the Atlantic Telegraph Company in early 1866.


The view seaward from the head of the pier
Image: Michael Harpur


But by 1887 the transatlantic telegraph cables at Foilhommerum Bay were being damaged by weather and corrosion caused by copper ore in the seabed. In that year the Anglo-American Telegraph Company, using the Cable Ship Minia, diverted their three functioning cables of 1873, '74 and '80 from the bay to enter Cooncrome Harbour and set up a telegraph hut to connect them to the landline. This went southwest for 3 km via a trench to the original White Strand landing point where they continued underwater to the Knightstown Cable Station building on Valentia Island. But over time Cooncrome's rocky shore proved too harsh for the cables and, by 1898, only one cable remained here. The others having been diverted directly through to Valentia Harbour and into Knightstown.


Cuas Crom has a lovely shelter beach from which to swim
Image: Michael Harpur


It was not only the natural environment that threatened the critical and newly established infrastructure. In 1867 a green flag raised on Ballycarberry Castle signalled the Iveragh Fenians to assemble and join a long-planned Fenian Rising. Their intention was to attack the Cahersiveen Constabulary Barracks and to destroy the Cable Station at Foilhommerum on Valentia. As it happens HMS Gladiator was in the bay and it dissuaded the rebels from attacking the cable station. Instead, the assembled Fenians marched towards Killarney but before reaching there they heard that the rising had been deferred and they dispersed. Many of which were rounded up and jailed. Seeing the exposure the new Constabulary Barracks in Cahersiveen was built in the 1870s to deter any further attack on the Cable Station at Knightstown.


Ballycarbery Castle today
Image: Michael G Kenny via CC BY-SA 2.0


The Anglo-American Telegraph Company would become the Western Union International which in 1911 took over the Valentia cables. In 1934 all their functioning cables were diverted to Lacknabau on the north side of Valentia and Cooncrome Harbour ceased to be used. These were then routed to the Knightstown station in an underground trench. Western Union International continued to operate from Valentia Island until it finally terminated its cable operations in 1966.


Leacanabuaile Stone Fort with Cahergall and Ballycarbery Castle in the distance
Image: Michael Harpur


From a boating perspective, Cooncrome Harbour is not the best anchorage due to the ocean wrapping around Doulus Head and sending refracting waves along this coast. But in settled weather, it is a lovely spot very far from the tourist crowds during the season. It is the perfect place for a family boat to anchor off and have a swim as the water here is surprisingly warm and clear and the beach is beautifully enclosed. It is also a short 10-minute walk, (850 metres) to the two wonderful historic ring forts of Leacanabuaile and Cahergal set on crowning windswept bluffs overlooking the river Cahersiveen. These are covered in the Cahersiveen Click to view haven entry from which it is a much further walk, 40 min (3.7 km) walk each way. On a fine day to anchor up have a swim and a visit to these forts would be a spectacular experience.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Kells Bay - 4.3 miles ENE
Dingle Harbour - 6.4 miles N
Ventry Harbour - 6 miles NNW
Great Blasket Island - 7.7 miles NW
Smerwick Harbour - 9 miles NNW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Knightstown - 1.5 miles SSW
Cahersiveen - 1 miles SE
Portmagee - 3.8 miles SW
Great Skellig (Skellig Michael) - 9.5 miles SW
Ballinskellig Bay - 5.7 miles S

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Cooncrome Harbour (Cuas Crom).



























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