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Glengarriff Harbour

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Overview





Glengarriff Harbour in Co. Cork on the southwest coast of Ireland, is an anchorage situated north of Whiddy Island in the northeast corner of Bantry Bay. The harbour offers simple access at any state of the tide and complete shelter from all weather conditions in beautiful surroundings. It is an excellent harbour to safely leave a yacht plus moorings are available.

Glengarriff Harbour in Co. Cork on the southwest coast of Ireland, is an anchorage situated north of Whiddy Island in the northeast corner of Bantry Bay. The harbour offers simple access at any state of the tide and complete shelter from all weather conditions in beautiful surroundings. It is an excellent harbour to safely leave a yacht plus moorings are available.

Glengariff requires some straightforward navigation as it hasn't got any navigational markings, and it is also advisable to enter during daylight.



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Keyfacts for Glengarriff Harbour



Last modified
May 10th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaPharmacy in the areaBus service available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this locationNote: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 44.594' N, 009° 32.352' W

At the centre of Glengarriff bay north of Garnish Island.

What is the initial fix?

The following Glengarriff initial fix will set up a final approach:
51° 42.550' N, 009° 32.570' W
This waypoint is 700 metres southeast of Four Heads Point 1.5nm from the channel between Ship Island and the eastern shoreline.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Glengarriff Harbour for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Bantry Harbour - 2.9 miles SE
  2. Adrigole - 4.7 miles WSW
  3. Dunbeacon Harbour - 4.8 miles S
  4. Dunkerron - 5.2 miles NNW
  5. Dunbeacon Cove - 5.8 miles S
  6. Kitchen Cove - 5.8 miles SSW
  7. Kilmakilloge Harbour - 6.8 miles W
  8. Lonehort Harbour - 7.1 miles WSW
  9. Kilcrohane Pier - 7.2 miles SSW
  10. Lawrence Cove - 7.8 miles WSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Bantry Harbour - 2.9 miles SE
  2. Adrigole - 4.7 miles WSW
  3. Dunbeacon Harbour - 4.8 miles S
  4. Dunkerron - 5.2 miles NNW
  5. Dunbeacon Cove - 5.8 miles S
  6. Kitchen Cove - 5.8 miles SSW
  7. Kilmakilloge Harbour - 6.8 miles W
  8. Lonehort Harbour - 7.1 miles WSW
  9. Kilcrohane Pier - 7.2 miles SSW
  10. Lawrence Cove - 7.8 miles WSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?
Glengarriff Harbour
Image: Greg Markus


Glengarriff Harbour is a smaller enclave of Bantry Bay that is entered between Big Point and Gun Point, just over ½ and mile northeast. It offers complete shelter to leisure craft near the head of the harbour to the north of Garinish, an island which lies on the west side of the harbour, divides the inlet into outer and inner harbours. A village of approximately 800 people lies ashore and the area and particularly Garinish Island are known internationally as a tourism venue with its many natural attractions.


Convergance Point Use southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location for BantryBay approaches. Sail up north of Whiddy Island and round Four Heads Point to port. Keep at least 300 metres offshore of Four Heads Point to avoid the foul ground that extends from the point, afterwards, the entrance to the harbour is clear. Make towards Gun Point and pass to it to starboard, again keeping at least 200 metres offshore as a shallow area extends westward from the point.

From there you should take a heading of approximately 015° to go between the narrower section lying between Ship Island and the eastern shoreline. There is a conspicuous white house with chimneys onshore northwest of Glengariff castle that acts as a useful tracking mark – note: the castle may be concealed by trees.

From Four Heads Rocks the entrance to the harbour is clear up to Garinish (Illnacullen) Island - 41m high with a conspicuous Martello tower on its summit – save for foul ground extending 200 metres south of this island, called Yellow Rocks. A mussel farm that lies off the eastern shore is the key issue to locate on this leg.

The channel between Ship Island and the eastern shoreline is easily accomplished as the middle section has over 16 metres of water and is at least 300 metres wide. However, due to unmarked off-lying rocks on either side keep to a middle-to-east position as you move up the channel. Once inside you will find another mussel farm on your starboard side beneath the castle. When past Garvillaun Island (to the north of Ship Island) the harbour is deep and clear of submerged rocks.

Haven location From there you can take your pick of several lovely anchorages in the inner harbour where depths decrease from about 12 metres to less than 2 metres at its head.

Yachts can anchor anywhere south of Bark Island in approximately 10 metres of water. North of Bark Island there is a perfectly sheltered anchorage in about 3m that provides convenient access to the pier in the north of the harbour. You will find very good mud holding throughout the area.

There is a wide choice of other anchorages around the harbour. In addition, there are six seasonal visitor moorings available at position 51° 44.900’N 009° 32.300’W. The 15 tons rated moorings are large, coloured bright yellow and labelled VISITOR. A daily charge of €7.50 may be levied.


Why visit here?
Glengarriff (Gleann Garbh in Irish, meaning "rough glen") is known as the ‘Madeira of Ireland’ on account of its spectacular beauty and mild climate. Positioned on a sheltered bay and surrounded by high mountains it is a cruising paradise that no one cruising Ireland’s southwest coast should miss. This lovely harbour offers a host of quiet anchorages to explore providing several days of pleasure to the passing boatman.


The must visit in the area is the state owned Illnacullen Island (Garinish on the charts) that is open to the public. Consisting of 15 hectares (37 acres) it is known to horticulturists all around the world as an island garden of rare beauty. The gardens owe their existence to the creative partnership, some eighty years ago, of Annan Bryce, the then owner of the island, and Harold Peto the architect and garden designer. In addition to the gardens a spectacular view of the surrounding area may be obtained from the old round Martello tower built to guard against a threatened Napoleonic invasion.

The nearby national forest (the glen that gave Glengarriff it's name) contains some of the oldest and most extensive oak and birch groves left in Ireland. A short but steep trail leads up to Lady Bantry's Lookout, offering a vista of Bantry Bay and the west Cork area.

The village, with a population of approximately 800 people, has a host of local pubs that frequently offer live music in the evenings during the tourist season.

From a yachtsman’s perspective, Glengarriff Harbour is the birthplace of the Irish Cruising Club. Nineteen yachtsmen happened to meet there in July 1929 aboard five cruising yachts and though unplanned the club was founded.

Even if you are unlucky with the weather here, you will never be bored for a moment with all the new anchorages to explore, a visit to Illnacullen Island, and eating out at the many local pubs and restaurants.


What facilities are available?
Glengariff is a lovely little tourist village with post office, hotels, restaurants, pubs, and basic shops for provisions of milk and bread but not fresh meat. Petrol & diesel are available and two water taps are available on the quay. A large hotel offers showers and baths. However, note that most shops here are tourist oriented.

Located 20 km (~12 miles) west of Bantry, and 30 km (~18 miles) east of Castletownbere there is a bus to Cork via Bantry and Killarney.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred in Glengarriff harbour. I left my boat here in the west corner of the bay in the Blue lagoon for a week unattended and there was no problem. In fact the ferry men to the island generously tied my yacht Topaz to their moorings as a force nine was promised one night while I was away and they felt she would be better on their spare mooring.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photohgraph with thanks to Niall at the Pink Elephant, Alan James and Jonathan Billinger.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.















A view from the Martello Tower with excellent close-ups of the harbour at the end




Aerial views of Garnish Island


About Glengarriff Harbour

Glengarriff (Gleann Garbh in Irish, meaning "rough glen") is known as the ‘Madeira of Ireland’ on account of its spectacular beauty and mild climate. Positioned on a sheltered bay and surrounded by high mountains it is a cruising paradise that no one cruising Ireland’s southwest coast should miss. This lovely harbour offers a host of quiet anchorages to explore providing several days of pleasure to the passing boatman.


The must visit in the area is the state owned Illnacullen Island (Garinish on the charts) that is open to the public. Consisting of 15 hectares (37 acres) it is known to horticulturists all around the world as an island garden of rare beauty. The gardens owe their existence to the creative partnership, some eighty years ago, of Annan Bryce, the then owner of the island, and Harold Peto the architect and garden designer. In addition to the gardens a spectacular view of the surrounding area may be obtained from the old round Martello tower built to guard against a threatened Napoleonic invasion.

The nearby national forest (the glen that gave Glengarriff it's name) contains some of the oldest and most extensive oak and birch groves left in Ireland. A short but steep trail leads up to Lady Bantry's Lookout, offering a vista of Bantry Bay and the west Cork area.

The village, with a population of approximately 800 people, has a host of local pubs that frequently offer live music in the evenings during the tourist season.

From a yachtsman’s perspective, Glengarriff Harbour is the birthplace of the Irish Cruising Club. Nineteen yachtsmen happened to meet there in July 1929 aboard five cruising yachts and though unplanned the club was founded.

Even if you are unlucky with the weather here, you will never be bored for a moment with all the new anchorages to explore, a visit to Illnacullen Island, and eating out at the many local pubs and restaurants.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Adrigole - 4.7 miles WSW
Lonehort Harbour - 7.1 miles WSW
Lawrence Cove - 7.8 miles WSW
Mill Cove - 8.2 miles WSW
Castletownbere (Castletown Bearhaven) - 9.2 miles WSW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Bantry Harbour - 2.9 miles SE
Ballynatra - 8.5 miles SW
Dooneen Pier - 8 miles SSW
Kilcrohane Pier - 7.2 miles SSW
Kitchen Cove - 5.8 miles SSW

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Glengarriff Harbour.












A view from the Martello Tower with excellent close-ups of the harbour at the end




Aerial views of Garnish Island



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