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Malahide

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Overview





Malahide is located on Ireland’s east coast approximately ten miles north of Dublin City and four miles north of Howth. It is a small vibrant seaside town and harbour that has a large scale fully serviced marina.

Situated in a narrow shallow inlet, within an estuary that is protected on either side by sand hills, the marina offers complete protection from all conditions. Access is straightforward. Although Malahide has a sandbar, most vessels should be able to enter with ease at two hours after low water, also the entrance channel is well marked and lit for night access.
Please note

It is recommended that newcomers to Malahide should only enter at half water and in daylight when the channel will be clearly seen. Vessels carrying any draft should seek advice from the marina regarding the current available depths prior to an entry. Malahide should not be attempted in any developed easterly conditions or in very rough conditions where Howth Harbour would be the better option.




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Keyfacts for Malahide
Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresCar hire available in the areaHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresCar hire available in the areaHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 27.238' N, 006° 9.055' W

Southern point of the Marina’s breakwater at the entrance.

What is the initial fix?

The following Malahide Fairway Buoy initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 27.101' N, 006° 6.811' W
This waypoint is the most recent Malahide Fairway Buoy (Q Fl) position. Like all markers in Malahide it is subject to change following the frequently shifting sand bar.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location.
  • Medium to deep draft vessels should contact the marina in advance and confirm the channel provides sufficient draft for entry

  • Find the Fairway marker buoy and look west to identify the channel marks

  • Proceed up the marked channel between the buoys


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Malahide for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.2 miles NNE
  2. Carrigeen Bay - 2.5 miles SE
  3. Talbot’s Bay - 2.9 miles ENE
  4. Howth - 2.9 miles SE
  5. The Boat Harbour - 3 miles ENE
  6. Rush Harbour - 3 miles NNE
  7. Balscadden Bay - 3.2 miles SE
  8. Saltpan Bay - 3.3 miles ENE
  9. Seal Hole Bay - 3.4 miles ENE
  10. Loughshinny - 3.8 miles NNE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.2 miles NNE
  2. Carrigeen Bay - 2.5 miles SE
  3. Talbot’s Bay - 2.9 miles ENE
  4. Howth - 2.9 miles SE
  5. The Boat Harbour - 3 miles ENE
  6. Rush Harbour - 3 miles NNE
  7. Balscadden Bay - 3.2 miles SE
  8. Saltpan Bay - 3.3 miles ENE
  9. Seal Hole Bay - 3.4 miles ENE
  10. Loughshinny - 3.8 miles NNE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Malahide is an affluent coastal suburban town situated within the Malahide Inlet. The harbour consists of a shallow and narrow inlet protected on each side by sandhills. The town is situated on the inlet’s south side 1¼ miles within the entrance and it is fronted by a marina. The marina can accommodate 350 vessels drawing up to 4 metres, at its west end, and lengths of up to 75 metres.

The marina, however, tends to become crowded during the summer and visiting small craft may have difficulty in finding a berth. It is therefore strongly recommended that availability be checked with the marina in advance on VHF Channel M; P: +353 1 845 4129.

Malahide should not be attempted in any developed easterly conditions, or in very rough conditions from other quarters, as the sea breaks on the extensive sand plateau outside. This is particularly the case on an ebb tide that can reach up to 3.5 knots and causes the sea to stand up in easterlies.
Please note

There is an abundance of Lobster Pots in the general Howth / Malahide / Lambay area and are made up of anything from a black oil can to a clear plastic lemonade bottle. Worse, orphaned pots can get so shrouded in seaweed that they are virtually impossible to identify. So tread carefully.




Convergance Point Positioned five miles southwest of Lambay Island, the most prominent feature of this coast, the directions provided for Lambay's Boat Harbour Click to view haven provides approach details.

From seaward the Malahide area is made conspicuous by many mainland structures. An aeronautical light, situated at the airport, about 4.5 miles west-southwest of the entrance to Malahide Inlet, is highly visible from seaward. On closer approaches, the extensive Grand Hotel will be seen standing on the south side of the inlet, about a mile west from the entrance. A quarter of a mile to the west of the hotel is a prominent 50-metre high chapel spire, and there is a square-towered castle with the red roofs of several houses close by, standing on the shoreline about 0.7 of a mile to the southeast of the hotel.


Initial fix location Approaching vessels should proceed to the listed Fairway Buoy initial fix. The buoy should be lit and in at least 4 metres of water but neither of these should be relied upon as the light may be out and a recent easterly storm could have altered the depths in the area.

The entrance channel is restricted by a sandbar with a charted LWS depth of 0.8. In the past, the entrance channel was periodically dredged but this has been largely abandoned in recent years owing to the increasing frequency of easterly storms that refill the entrance. These storms have caused the sandbar to alter shape and now it appears to be more of an extensive plateau with many ridges. It is strongly recommended that all visitors obtain the latest channel depth information when contacting the marina.



Once sufficient draft and conditions have been assured, proceed up the marked channel between the buoys, leaving each to the appropriate side, up to the Marina entrance. A useful initial lead-in-transit to the entrance is provided by aligning the 50 metres high church spire and the right-hand edge of the Grand Hotel on a bearing approximately 266° T. Three red and three green anchored lateral marks indicate the run from Malahide Fairway Buoy through the drying sandbanks to just before the narrowing of the beaches.



From there to the marina entrance the channel is marked by three sets of buoys. This brings the total number of marks to six port and six starboard, each of which having a different light characteristic to assist a night entrance.





Although the channel is very narrow it is clearly laid out and steep-too enabling vessels to pass close to the marks. Deeper draft vessels should, however, stay mid-channel and in the narrows for best water.





Maintain a close watch on the soundings as the vessel approaches the start of the moorings area to the south of the channel, as there are some old dredged mud deposits in this area. If the vessel should happen to run aground it is all mud and sand inside the harbour and there is very little hard to hit.





The last 200 metres to the marina entrance is cluttered with moored small craft that encroach on the fairway making it very narrow as a result.





Haven location Visitors should have made advance arrangements with the marina or the club to make use of moorings. If you elect to use moorings you will find a concrete landing pier and boat slips on which to land. Once past the moorings area bear round to starboard where the entrance to the marina will be seen. Visitor’s berths are on pontoon A.
Please note

Make a note of the current when preparing to berth in the marina. A strong current runs through the pontoons in Malahide that can push a vessel onto the pontoons.



In the past, it was possible to anchor in the inlet but this is no longer feasible due to the level of boating activity in the area.


Why visit here?
Malahide derives its name from the Gaelic Mullagh Íde that means the 'Sand Hills of the Hydes'. It is thought the name ‘Hydes’ stems from a Norman founder of the town.

The town’s origins date back to a settlement that can be traced back to 6000 B.C. Ireland’s patron saint St. Patrick reportedly visited the area in 432, and in 795 the Vikings arrived on Ireland's shores followed by the Danes in 897. In the latter end of the 12th-century, the Normans took control of the country. They consolidated their control of this agricultural and maritime area by the construction of a castle when Malahide would most likely have acquired its name. The town then developed in earnest around the castle.



The castle’s earliest section, the three-story tower house, dates back to 1185 when it was home to the Talbot family. It remained with this family for a remarkable 791 years until 1976, with the singular exception of a period from 1649 through to 1660 when Oliver Cromwell granted it to Miles Corbet. After the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland, and the subsequent demise of Cromwell, Corbet was hanged and the castle was restored to the Talbots. The building was later notably enlarged in the reign of Edward IV, and the towers added in 1765.

By the early 19th century the village had a population of over one thousand and had developed a number of local industries, including salt harvesting. The harbour had then added commercial operations and was landing coal and construction materials. In Georgian times the area grew in popularity as a seaside resort for wealthy Dubliners and expanded to the broad shape that can be seen today. In more recent times Malahide’s population of 1500 in 1960, had expanded to almost 25,000 in 2006, and is still a rapidly growing dormitory town for the Dublin area. Most of the population lives outside the core in a series of large housing estates that are regarded as some of Dublin's more affluent suburbs.

Today Malahide’s seaside resort heritage is still evident from the fine collection of Georgian houses both in the town and along the seafront. It is still a popular city day-tripper destination during the summer months. Outside of its coastal attributes, Malahide is chiefly known for the glorious Malahide Castle that was sold to the Dublin County Council in 1976.



The castle itself combines many of the styles of the centuries it crossed. It can be visited on paid for guided-tour-only basis. The best-known rooms are the Oak Room and the Great Hall, which displays Talbot family history that includes many family portraits. The medieval great hall is the only one in Ireland that is preserved in its original form, and authentic 18th-century furnishing can be seen in the other rooms. The Talbot Botanic Gardens are situated behind the castle. These comprise several hectares of plants and lawns, a walled garden of 1.6 hectares and seven glasshouses, including a Victorian period conservatory. The vast parkland around the castle is one of the few surviving examples of 18th-century landscaped parks with wide lawns surrounded by a protective belt of trees. It has more than 5,000 different clearly labelled species of trees and shrubs and can be visited freely. In addition to woodland walks, and a marked "exercise trail", the park features actively used sports grounds, including a cricket pitch and several football pitches, a 9-hole par-3 golf course, an 18-hole pitch-and-putt course, tennis courts and a boules area.



Separately within the castle is ‘The Fry Model Railway’ that is one of the world's largest miniature railway displays. This large, 2,500 square feet, working miniature rail display, presents rare handmade models of the Irish railway from the 1920s-1930s. There is also a dolls house within the castle, called ‘Tara's Palace’, that has 25 rooms, all fully furnished in miniature.



From a Boating perspective, Malahide Harbour is a key sailing centre and a major cruising destination. It offers a visiting yachtsman complete protection with excellent boating facilities, a wide variety of first-rate eating places, plus plenty of historic interest. All this with Dublin City within easy reach via overground rail.


What facilities are available?
Malahide Marina is one of the largest Marinas in the Dublin area. It provides over 350 berths and can receive vessels of up to 75 metres in length and has a maintained depth of 2.3 metres. The facilities offered at the Marina are all modern and well kept. A 30 ton capacity mobile hoist is available in the adjacent yard and it has a hard standing capability to accommodate up to 170 vessels. All boating necessities are catered for, showers, laundry, diesel, gas, and chandlery, plus you will find ample if modest shopping, pubs and restaurants in the surrounding town.

Malahide is situated 16 kilometres north of Dublin City on the R107 and is approximately a 15 minute car ride; albeit traffic dependant. The village has excellent public transport with an hourly train service from Dublin's Connolly Station as well as by Dublin Bus No. 42 that leaves every 15 minutes from Beresford Place behind the Custom House in Dublin. It is also situated just a 10 minute drive, four miles distance, from Dublin international airport. Road routes such as the M1 and M50 motorways are highly convenient and high speed ferries to the U.K. are within easy reach.


Any security concerns?
There are no issues as Malahide Marina has secure access.


With thanks to:
Brian Berry and Charlie Kavanagh - ISA/RYA Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




































A Malahide overview



An introduction to Malahide Castle & Gardens




A birds-eye view of Slane, Malahide and Howth



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