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Carrigeen Bay

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Overview





Ireland’s Eye is a small uninhabited island located off the north shore of the Howth peninsula immediately outside Howth Harbour on Ireland's east coast. Carrigeen Bay is situated on the west side of the island and offers a secluded anchorage.

Carrigeen Bay is a tolerable anchorage that is only serviceable in settled conditions and is used largely for a landing on Ireland’s Eye. It should be avoided in any unsettled weather and particularly after strong east or southeast conditions that cause a swell to run in Howth Sound. The anchorage may be approached from the seaward to the east and south between Howth Harbour and Irelands Eye, or from the north via Howth Sound. Access is straightforward in each case.
Please note

In any unsettled weather conditions contact Howth Marina prior to arrival so that a berth may be allocated.




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Keyfacts for Carrigeen Bay
Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
3 stars: Tolerable; in suitable conditions a vessel may be left unwatched and an overnight stay.



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary

A tolerable location with straightforward access.

Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 24.270' N, 006° 4.320' W

This is in the two metre contour off the landing beach where you can feel your way into a suitable depth.

What are the initial fixes?

The following waypoints will set up a final approach:

(i) Howth Sound fairway initial fix

53° 24.500' N, 006° 4.560' W

This leads through into Howth Sound and passed through the fairway on a line of bearing of 158° T that may be seen by aligning the Martello Tower, situated in the southeast corner of Howth harbours, aligned against the eastern side of the harbour entrance.

(ii) Howth Buoy initial fix

53° 23.727' N, 006° 3.593' W

This waypoint sets up a final approach from the southeast (south around Irelands Eye). The Howth buoy is the first marker for the channel into Howth Sound starboard hand F1.G 5 sec. Please note if approaching from the north keep outside of Rowan Rocks east cardinal Q - (3) 10 sec.
Please note

Initial fixes only set up their listed targets. Do not plan to sail directly between initial fixes as a routing sequence.




What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location. Use the directions provided for Howth Click to view haven for approaches to Carrigeen Bay. From the Howth Sound fairway initial fix it is possible to come straight into the anchorage.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Carrigeen Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Howth - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Balscadden Bay - 0.7 miles SSE
  3. Malahide - 2.5 miles NW
  4. Talbot’s Bay - 3.2 miles NNE
  5. The Boat Harbour - 3.4 miles NNE
  6. Seal Hole Bay - 3.5 miles NNE
  7. Saltpan Bay - 3.6 miles NNE
  8. Dublin Port (Poolbeg Marina) - 3.9 miles SW
  9. Rogerstown Inlet - 4.1 miles NNW
  10. Dún Laoghaire Harbour - 4.2 miles SSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Howth - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Balscadden Bay - 0.7 miles SSE
  3. Malahide - 2.5 miles NW
  4. Talbot’s Bay - 3.2 miles NNE
  5. The Boat Harbour - 3.4 miles NNE
  6. Seal Hole Bay - 3.5 miles NNE
  7. Saltpan Bay - 3.6 miles NNE
  8. Dublin Port (Poolbeg Marina) - 3.9 miles SW
  9. Rogerstown Inlet - 4.1 miles NNW
  10. Dún Laoghaire Harbour - 4.2 miles SSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
Ireland's Eye as seen from the mainland
Image: Siobhan Pepper


Convergance Point Use the directions provided for Howth Click to view haven for approaches to Carrigeen Bay. From the Howth Sound fairway initial fix it is possible to come straight into the anchorage.

Haven location Anchor in sand off the island according to draft and conditions. Those intending to explore the island may wish to take advantage of a rising tide to make the dinghy ride to the shore shorter by coming in closer.


Why visit here?
Ireland's Eye, in Irish Inis Mac Neasáin, derives its name from a combination of Irish myth and ancient Norse. In Celtic times the small island was called ‘Eria's Island’. Eria being a woman's name that in time became confused with Erin, a derivation of Éireann, the Irish name for Ireland. Later the Vikings substituted Ey, the Norse equivalent for Island, and so it acquired the name Erin's Ey that ultimately became Ireland's Eye.

Situated about a kilometre north of Howth harbour, with Lambay Island some five miles further to the north, it is made up of the main island with a registered area of 21.5 hectares (53 acres), plus a range of rocks and an islet called ‘Thulla’ to the south. The island’s most spectacular natural feature is its huge freestanding rock "The Stack", at the northeastern corner of the island on the opposite side to Carrigeen Bay.


St. Nessan founded a monastery on the island in the 6th century but no trace of this exists today. The remnants of a later 8th-century church, the Church of the Three Sons of Nessan, can still be found to the southeast from the landing beach at Carrigeen Bay. This was the historic parish church for Howth until in recent centuries a more convenient church was established in the village - those planning to visit the church ruins should come prepared with long trousers as it is surrounded by a thicket of nettles.


The early 19th century Martello Tower overlooking the anchorage can be visited. It is part of a series of towers built around the coast of Ireland to defend against a Napoleonic invasion with its corresponding compatriots overlooking Howth Harbour and another tower at Red Rock, Sutton. The tower's entrance is five metres above ground level and can be accessed by a rope that hangs down its wall.


Today the island is part of a Special Area of Conservation and is one of the best places around Dublin for bird watching. "The Stack" plays host to a large variety of seabirds, including thousands of guillemots, razorbills, fulmars and gulls. Ireland's fifth gannet colony became established on ‘The Stack’ in the 1980s, and there are now a few hundred pairs which breed there each year. A large cormorant colony and a few breeding pairs of puffins are also on the main island. Grey Seals are prolific in the sea around the island.


Unlike its near neighbour Lambay Island, access to Ireland's Eye has never been restricted and admission is free. For the visiting yachtsman, after a dinghy landing, Ireland's Eye is an interesting island to explore with an abundance of wildlife and spectacular scenery. Please exercise care not to distress bird life during your visit and if you plan to rock climb please do so in late summer.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities or water available on Ireland’s Eye.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred off Ireland’s Eye. You are most likely to be alone when anchored here.


With thanks to:
Charlie Kavanagh, ISA/RYA Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fixes' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.


















An aerial view of the island commencing from Carrigeen Bay




The Carrigeen Bay approach from Howth Harbour




The approach into the Carrigeen Bay landing area




The view from the island of Carrigeen Bay




The view northward from the island's summit




The view of Howth Sound from the island's summit



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.