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Saltpan Bay

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Overview





Lambay Island is a small island on the east coast of Ireland, about 2.5 square kilometres in size, situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. Saltpan Bay, formerly Swallow Cove, is situated on the north side of the island close off the northwest point.

With its high sheer cliffs and deep water, making close-in anchoring possible, the secluded bay offers excellent shelter from the west through south to southeast winds. In most southerly conditions the anchorage will be found to be completely calm and free from swell. Navigation is very straightforward although daylight is required as there are no markings. Access from the north round to east is completely unimpeded, whilst approaches from other directions require basic navigation.
Please note

In light north to north-easterly conditions a better option is Talbot Bay close to the southwestern corner of Lambay Island. In heavy northerly conditions, Howth harbour would be the preferred option.




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Keyfacts for Saltpan Bay
Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring location

Considerations
Restriction: landing not recommended, possible or permitted here

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
5 metres (16.4 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring location

Considerations
Restriction: landing not recommended, possible or permitted here



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 29.800' N, 006° 1.272' W

On the five metre contour in the middle of the bay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Saltpan Bay initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 30.535' N, 006° 1.310' W
This waypoint is three quarters of a mile north of the anchorage.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location.

  • Pass outside the marked dangers on the northwest and southwest corners of the island.

  • Come in bearing due south to the anchorage.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Saltpan Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. The Boat Harbour - 0.3 miles WSW
  2. Seal Hole Bay - 0.4 miles SE
  3. Talbot’s Bay - 0.5 miles SSW
  4. Rush Harbour - 1.6 miles NW
  5. Loughshinny - 2.2 miles NW
  6. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.2 miles WNW
  7. Malahide - 3.3 miles WSW
  8. Carrigeen Bay - 3.6 miles SSW
  9. Skerries Bay and Harbour - 3.8 miles NNW
  10. Howth - 3.9 miles SSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. The Boat Harbour - 0.3 miles WSW
  2. Seal Hole Bay - 0.4 miles SE
  3. Talbot’s Bay - 0.5 miles SSW
  4. Rush Harbour - 1.6 miles NW
  5. Loughshinny - 2.2 miles NW
  6. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.2 miles WNW
  7. Malahide - 3.3 miles WSW
  8. Carrigeen Bay - 3.6 miles SSW
  9. Skerries Bay and Harbour - 3.8 miles NNW
  10. Howth - 3.9 miles SSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Saltpan Bay is about 500 metres east of Scotch Point the island’s northwest corner. The bay is made up of high precipitous cliffs with at least 10 metres of water to be found 200 metres off the islands northern cliffs. It has unimpeded access when approached at right angles to the shoreline or a due north approach.

Convergance Point Use the Lambay Island descriptions provided for The Boat Harbour Click to view haven for approaches to the island area. The islands outlying dangers are off its western corners; marked by Taylor Rock north cardinal on the northwest corner and the Burren Rock starboard beacon on the southwest corner.



Haven location Vessels can anchor right up close to the cliff face in sand with very good holding in 5 metres.
Please note

On a sunny day however it makes sense to drop anchor a little further out from the shadow of the cliff to take benefit from the sunshine.




Why visit here?
Just a short sail from the hustling, bustling capital of Ireland, Saltpan Bay is a perfect secluded escape into a nature reserve.

Standing above the bay from the west is the steep sheer precipice of rock that makes up Gouge Point. It plays host to the remains of a large promontory fort that dates back to Neolithic ages. Those who have been ashore say the double ditch fort’s mounds and valleys are still in a good condition and commanding views overlooking the bay and sea approaches are spectacular.

The island is a very important international sanctuary for breeding seabirds. A full census of seabirds on Lambay island was completed in 2004 and it stated: "Lambay holds Ireland's largest 'mixed' seabird colony and is of international importance". This is never so clearly appreciated than in Saltpan Bay.

The high sheer cliffs here are home to thousands of nesting birds. Vessels can anchor right up against the cliff face in deep water and listen to their raucous calls. Guillemots, gulls, puffins with their bright colourful beaks, curlews, razorbills, and Kittiwake can all be observed at close quarters nestling into the cliffs and on the surrounding water. Indeed it is advisable to pack a fishing rod and plan to join them hunting as there is good mackerel fishing here. It is pretty safe to ‘bank’ on getting a fresh dinner in Saltpan Bay.

From a boating perspective, the extensive Saltpan Bay with its high protective sheer cliffs and excellent holding is perhaps one of the best anchorages on the east coast of Ireland.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities on the island, and no landing should take place. The island is privately owned by the Revelstoke family and the owners value their privacy. Saltpan Bay may be able provide you with a fresh supper as there is excellent mackerel fishing here.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred anchored off this private offshore island. Vessels are most likely to be alone or in the company of other anchored yachtsmen.


With thanks to:
Charlie Kavanagh - ISA/RYA Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner. Photography with thanks to Brian Lennon, Михал Орела, David Medcalf, and Servilan.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.












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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.