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Talbot’s Bay

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Overview





Lambay Island is a small island off the east coast of Ireland, about 2.5 square kilometres in size, situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. Talbot's Bay is located close south to the westernmost point of the island.

The secluded bay offers a tolerable anchorage in settled north and northeasterly conditions but is subject to an uncomfortable swell. Access is straightforward from the south to east and is completely unimpeded, all approaches from other directions require basic navigation. Daylight navigation is required as there are no markings.
Please note

In heavy conditions with a southerly component a better option is Saltpan Bay close to the northwestern corner of Lambay Island. In heavy northerly conditions, Howth harbour would be a preferable option.




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Keyfacts for Talbot’s Bay
Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring location

Considerations
Restriction: landing not recommended, possible or permitted here

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
5 metres (16.4 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
3 stars: Tolerable; in suitable conditions a vessel may be left unwatched and an overnight stay.



Last modified
July 18th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A tolerable location with straightforward access.

Facilities
None listed


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring location

Considerations
Restriction: landing not recommended, possible or permitted here



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 29.177' N, 006° 1.918' W

On the five metre contour in the middle of the bay, approximately 200 hundred metres off the coast.

What is the initial fix?

The following Talbot’s Bay initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 28.580' N, 006° 1.940' W
This waypoint is three quarters of a mile due south of the bay.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Strangford Lough to Dublin Bay Route location.

  • Use the Lambay Island descriptions provided for The Boat Harbour Click to view haven for approaches to the island area.

  • Pass outside the marked dangers on the northwest and southwest corners of the island.

  • Come in bearing due west and anchor under the cliffs.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Talbot’s Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. The Boat Harbour - 0.3 miles N
  2. Saltpan Bay - 0.5 miles NNE
  3. Seal Hole Bay - 0.6 miles E
  4. Rush Harbour - 1.7 miles NW
  5. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.1 miles WNW
  6. Loughshinny - 2.4 miles NNW
  7. Malahide - 2.9 miles WSW
  8. Carrigeen Bay - 3.2 miles SSW
  9. Howth - 3.5 miles SSW
  10. Balscadden Bay - 3.7 miles S
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. The Boat Harbour - 0.3 miles N
  2. Saltpan Bay - 0.5 miles NNE
  3. Seal Hole Bay - 0.6 miles E
  4. Rush Harbour - 1.7 miles NW
  5. Rogerstown Inlet - 2.1 miles WNW
  6. Loughshinny - 2.4 miles NNW
  7. Malahide - 2.9 miles WSW
  8. Carrigeen Bay - 3.2 miles SSW
  9. Howth - 3.5 miles SSW
  10. Balscadden Bay - 3.7 miles S
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?


Talbot's Bay forms part of the low lying nature of the island’s western side and has at least 5 metres of water 200 metres off the shoreline. It has unimpeded access when approached from due south at right angles to the shoreline.

Convergance Point Use the Lambay Island descriptions provided for The Boat Harbour Click to view haven for approaches to the island area. The islands outlying dangers are off its western corners; marked by Taylor Rock north cardinal on the northwest corner and the Burren Rock starboard beacon on the southwest corner. Talbot's Bay is about 700 metres east of the island’s southwest corner.



Haven location A vessel should come slowly into about 5 metres and drop the hook in sand. The Bay anchoring area is small and if there are other boats already there it may be difficult to find a comfortable location to anchor. Should this be the case try Carnoon Bay situated about 400 metres to the southeast. This is a private island so no landing should take place here unless prior consent has been obtained.


Why visit here?
Talbot’s Bay is one of three excellent very small, sand and stone beaches that are situated in sheltered coves within the island’s southern shoreline.

The southern side of the island, in contrast to its high cliffs on the north and eastern sides, presents a more accessible low shoreline. The three bays include Carnoon Bay, situated about 400 metres to the southeast of Talbot’s Bay, which is also a popular anchoring location. Bishop’s Bay a further 700 metres to the southeast, tucked in out of harm’s way and facing the mainland from the island's southwest corner, is one of Lambay’s better swimming locations. It acquired its name, and the alternative name of ‘Dead Man's Bay’, around 1900 when a body was washed up on to its beach. The body had a crucifix and other high order clerical items that indicated the man had been a bishop.

Lambay has the largest concentration of grey seals on Ireland’s east coast, and Talbot's Bay is a great place to observe them on the rocks fronting the bay. When the Malahide Talbots owned Lambay, after whom the bay is named, seal shoot-ins were sadly one of their popular recreations. Fortunately, things have changed under Lord Revelstoke and now the island is a very important international sanctuary for breeding seals. Several years ago he received an offer for seal meat from a Japanese importer, who intended making aphrodisiacs from the meat. The offer was turned down.

From a boating perspective, Talbot’s Bay is a popular yachting anchorage and a good alternative to the excellent Saltpan Bay should it become uncomfortable due to northerly conditions. Akin to Saltpan Bay it is a perfect secluded escape into a nature reserve, just a short sail from the hustling, bustling capital of Ireland.


What facilities are available?
There are no facilities on the island, and no landing should take place. The island is privately owned by the Revelstoke family and the owners value their privacy.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred anchored off this private offshore island. Vessels are most likely to be alone or in the company of other anchored yachtsmen.


With thanks to:
Charlie Kavanagh - ISA/RYA Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner. Photography with thanks to William Murphy, Михал Орела and Brian Lennon.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.









A flight over the harbour area and Talbot's Bay



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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.