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Arthurstown

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Overview





Aurthurstown is situated on the southeast coast of Ireland seven miles within and on the eastern shores of Waterford Harbour. It is a small village with a pier that dries beyond the head on springs. The quay with a stone bottom is not ideal to dry out on, but a vessel working the tides can come alongside for a short shore visit at high water or anchor off in settled weather and land here.

This is an exposed quay and should only be considered in settled conditions. It is open to everything from northeast round to northwest and it is particularly bad in a north-westerly where options further upriver should be adopted. Although protected from the south the pier becomes awash in very strong southerly conditions, especially at high water. Fishing boats do weather out a southerly here but it is completely inaccessible when the pier is awash. The wide, unhindered and well-marked Waterford Harbour estuary provides safe access, night or day and at any stage of the tide.
Please note

Tidal streams are a prime consideration within Waterford Harbour; a strong adverse current will make for slow progress, conversely, a favourable passage current will make the estuary quickly traversable.




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Keyfacts for Arthurstown
Facilities
Slipway availablePublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
Set near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
-1 metres (-3.28 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
2 stars: Exposed; unattended vessels should be watched from the shore and a comfortable overnight stay is unlikely.



Last modified
May 26th 2019

Summary* Restrictions apply

An exposed location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Slipway availablePublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
Set near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration



HM  +353 51 301400      Ch.12
Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 14.407' N, 006° 57.226' W

At the end of the pier

What is the initial fix?

The following Waterford Harbour marked channel initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 10.740' N, 006° 56.320' W
This waypoint is 600 metres south by southwest of the Waterford Channel Number 1. starboard-hand marker (Fl.G.2s on a bearing of 009°T). It is directly east of Creadan Head, upon the eastern side of the Waterford Channel where at night you will see the Dunmore East leading lights alternate white/green.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Seaward approaches and the run up the harbour are covered in the Port of Waterford Click to view haven entry.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Arthurstown for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Ballyhack - 0.4 miles WNW
  2. Passage East - 0.4 miles W
  3. Duncannon - 0.8 miles SSE
  4. Seedes Bank - 0.9 miles NW
  5. Buttermilk Point - 1 miles NW
  6. Cheekpoint - 1.5 miles NW
  7. Dollar Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Creadan Head - 2.2 miles S
  9. Templetown Bay - 2.6 miles SSE
  10. Little Island - 2.6 miles W
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Ballyhack - 0.4 miles WNW
  2. Passage East - 0.4 miles W
  3. Duncannon - 0.8 miles SSE
  4. Seedes Bank - 0.9 miles NW
  5. Buttermilk Point - 1 miles NW
  6. Cheekpoint - 1.5 miles NW
  7. Dollar Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Creadan Head - 2.2 miles S
  9. Templetown Bay - 2.6 miles SSE
  10. Little Island - 2.6 miles W
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Arthurstown Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Arthurstown is a small village situated on the east bank of the River Suir three miles below its junction of the Barrow Nore. It is located directly east from Passage East about a mile above of Duncannon and seven miles within Waterford Harbour. The village has a small drying fishing pier.


How to get in?
Arthurstown Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use the Port of Waterford Click to view haven for details of seaward approaches, entry to Waterford Harbour and the run up the estuary.


Initial fix location From the initial fix, set in the middle of the entrance, head northeast for the ‘Waterford’ port marker buoy and then pick up the No. 1 and 2 buoys of the fairway. From here follow the marked channel up past Duncannon until the highly distinctive 'Passage Spit' octahedral marker locally known as ‘the spider’ is being approached on the port side.


The 'Passage Spit' marker opposite Arthurstown
Image: Michael Harpur


Arthurstown will be found opposite the Passage Spit port hand marker, to the starboard side and 100 metres off the channel on the Wexford shoreline. The pier has a street light at its head and is conspicuously extending out from the south side of the recess that is King’s Bay.


Approaching Arthurstown Pier from the channel
Image: Burke Corbett


Haven location With ample tide, turn onto the head of pier and round close to it. Berth on the outer end of the inner face of the pier where 2 to 3 metres can be found. The pier has a rocky bottom that is less than ideal for drying out on.
Please note

A few fishing vessels use the pier and they should be given priority access, and visitors are asked not to hinder their operations.



Alternatively, in settled conditions, anchor 200 metres off the head of the pier.


Why visit here?
Arthurstown, in Irish: Colmán, derives its name from Arthur Chichester who was a descendant of Arthur Chichester 2nd Earl of Donegal. As noted in the Buttermilk Point entry, the lands in this area were originally purchased by the Etchingham family after the Dissolution of Dunbrody Abbey in the sixteenth century. The estates came to the Chichester family in 1660 by the marriage of Arthur Chichester 2nd Earl of Donegal to Jane Etchingham, the only child of John Etchingham.

It was during the first quarter of the 1800s that the Anglo-Irish soldier, politician and courtier Arthur Chichester, the 1st Baron Templemore (8 January 1797 – 26 September 1837), built Dunbrody Park and the estate village of Arthurstown, providing the village with his name. In Samuel Lewis’s 1837 'A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland'; ARTHURSTOWN, or KING'S-BAY contained 170 inhabitants. It is situated on Waterford harbour, three miles below the junction of the rivers Barrow, Suir, and Nore, and derives its origin and name from its proprietor Arthur, the present Lord Templemore whose seat is here, and who has been mostly responsible for the estate and the building that has taken place within the last few years.


Arthurstown’s pier was constructed in 1829
Image: Michael Harpur


The village became a hub upon which other services, such as a hospital, police barracks, court-house, coastguard station etc., were developed around. Estate revenue was earned via tolls on village markets for agricultural produce. With the aid of a Fishery Board grant, Chichester constructed Arthurstown’s pier in 1829. This was to facilitate trade and to encourage his tenants to become involved in the fishing industry. The pier provided additional estate revenue via tolls levied on all pier transactions; principally coal from South Wales, slates from Bangor; and the exportation to Waterford of corn, pigs, butter, eggs, honey, and poultry.


Arthurstown Pier has remain little changed since construction
Image: Michael Harpur


Samuel Lewis astutely observed at the time It has a commodious quay, with a gravelly strand open to Waterford harbour; and a pier of millstone grit found in the quarries here, 306 feet in length, and originally intended for the accommodation of the boats employed in the fishery. Vessels of 100 tons' burden can come up close to the pier, but the entrance has lately become partially choked with an accumulation of mud, which requires speedy removal, and the adoption of a plan calculated to prevent a recurrence of the obstruction. The bay is subject to a heavy sea during the prevalence of south, south-west, and northwest winds. Advice as good then, as it is today.


Arthurstown as seen from the pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Today Arthurstown is a quaint holiday village that noticeably increased in size during Ireland’s Celtic Tiger years with the addition of several holiday homes. Dunbrody House also referred to as Dunbrody Country House Hotel and Restaurant was occupied by the Chichesters until they sold it in the late twentieth century. Set upon two hundred acres of parkland the beautiful Irish Georgian manor is just a 10-minute walk from the pier.

From a boating perspective, it is a pleasant beach and offers a quiet spot to stop off. There is a pub a short stroll from the pier and a coastal walk to Ballyhack. Arthurstown does have excellent road access making it an ideal set down and collection point, however, the car ferry traffic uses this route from Wexford and it can be busy.


What facilities are available?
Apart from a pier with a high tide slipway and its excellent R733 regional road, that runs along the eastern shore of the Waterford Harbour estuary, there are no other services available at Arthurstown.


Any security concerns?
There are no reported security issues in the area.


With thanks to:
John Carroll, Ballyhack, County Wexford, Ireland. Photography with thanks to Humphrey Bolton, Burke Corbett and Michael Harpur.


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