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Teignmouth

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Overview





Teignmouth is situated in the northwest corner of Lyme Bay, on the north side of the entrance to the River Teigh on England's south coast. It offers visiting boats two mid-river pontoon close to the town’s back beach.

Situated in a landlocked harbour, the pontoons offer complete protection from all conditions. Approaches require attentive navigation owing to strong currents and a shifting sandbar, with a metre or less in places that require a rise of the tide to make an approach. The harbour is not accessible in any developed onshore conditions or swell from the northeast around to south, particularly on the ebb. In settled weather, it is well marked all the way with lit lateral marks and the bar presents little issue. Newcomers should not attempt to enter at night owing to strong tidal streams in the entrance.
Please note

Despite being a harbour for centuries, Teignmouth should never be considered a harbour of refuge as there are frequently changing sandbanks Teignmouth.




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Keyfacts for Teignmouth
Facilities
Slipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: can get overwhelmed by visiting boats during peak periodsNote: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2.8 metres (9.19 feet).

Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
January 28th 2019

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Slipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: may be subject to a sand barNote: can get overwhelmed by visiting boats during peak periodsNote: harbour fees may be charged



HM  +44 1626 773165     HM  +44 7796 178456      thc@teignmouthharbour.com     teignmouthharbour.com      Ch.12 [Teignmouth Harbour Radio]
Position and approaches
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Haven position

50° 32.392' N, 003° 30.053' W

This is in the middle of the entrance about 40 metres south of Point Light beacon, OC.G.6s&F.G.(vert).

What is the initial fix?

The following Teignmouth Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
50° 32.315' N, 003° 29.000' W
This a ½ mile out, on the 5-metre contour and the recommended 265°T transit of the Lucette Lighted Beacon, Oc.R.6s4m3M, front, situated on the training wall, lined up between with 2 white stripes painted on the seawall behind.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern England’s coastal overview from Portland Bill to Start Point Route location.

  • Pick up the 265°T transit of the Lucette Lighted Beacon, Oc.R.6s4m3M, front, with 2 white stripes painted on the seawall behind to lead in across The Bar.

  • Pass over the bar passing a green starboard, Fl.G.2s, and a red port buoy, Fl.R.2s, that mark the outer entrance to the channel then a green conical buoy, Fl G 2s, inside the bar.

  • Pass north of the Philip Lucette Light-beacon and around The Point, marked near its southwest extremity by a starboard light-beacon, OC.G.6s&F.G.(vert).

  • Inside the channel bends north by northeast for circa 400 metres up to the pontoons and is marked by light-buoys on either side. Watch the tidal sweep on this turn.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Teignmouth for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Watcombe Cove - 1.7 miles S
  2. Babbacombe Bay - 2.2 miles S
  3. Anstey’s Cove - 2.4 miles S
  4. Hope Cove (Tor Bay) - 2.8 miles S
  5. Torquay - 3.1 miles SSW
  6. The Bight - 3.1 miles NNE
  7. Exmouth - 3.4 miles NNE
  8. Starcross - 3.5 miles NNE
  9. Starcross Yacht Club - 4.2 miles NNE
  10. Paignton - 4.2 miles SSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Watcombe Cove - 1.7 miles S
  2. Babbacombe Bay - 2.2 miles S
  3. Anstey’s Cove - 2.4 miles S
  4. Hope Cove (Tor Bay) - 2.8 miles S
  5. Torquay - 3.1 miles SSW
  6. The Bight - 3.1 miles NNE
  7. Exmouth - 3.4 miles NNE
  8. Starcross - 3.5 miles NNE
  9. Starcross Yacht Club - 4.2 miles NNE
  10. Paignton - 4.2 miles SSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Teignmouth visitor pontoons close to the Back (or River) Beach
Image: Michael Harpur


Teignmouth is a seaside town, commercial harbour and fishing port situated on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign. Its entrance lies between The Ness, a bold headland of red sandstone, located on the south side, and The Point, a low southward extending sand spit tongue that is marked near its southwest extremity by a light beacon. The town is situated mainly on a small peninsula leading down to The Point.

The harbour has three main quays, 119 to 140 metres long, which provide berths, for vessels with drafts up to 5 metres. Visitors are welcomed and accommodated on two mid-channel visitor pontoons that lie close to the shore close off the Back (or River) Beach.

The harbour is approached over The Bar, that has as little as 0.1 metres CD and is ever changing from the effects of southerly gales. The Harbour Authority aims to maintain a dredged channel with a least depth 1 metre above CD but depths may vary and it is advisable to check before an approach is made. Vessels carrying 2 metres should have no problem making an approach in high water ±0300 but do not push it any later as this would not be a place to ground on a falling tide. Outside of strong winds or a big swell from northeast round to south, and particularly so the ebb, the bar usually presents no problems but be watchful of the sweep of the tidal streams at the entrance.


Berths are limited and it can get busy during the season
Image: Michael Harpur


The pontoons for visiting yachts have no provision to get ashore so a tender has to be launched to land. The moorings are managed by Teignmouth Harbour Office, VHF Ch. 12 [Teignmouth Harbour Radio], Landline+44 1626 773165, Emergency Mobile+44 7796 178456, or E-mailthc@teignmouthharbour.com, open Hours Mon - Fri (09:00 - 17:00). Mooring Charge (2019) is £1.50/m per day/night.

No anchoring is permitted within the harbour area. In settled or offshore weather it is possible to anchor outside the harbour to the southeast of Teignmouth Pier, circa 200 metres north of the first starboard buoy. But this is a ⅓ of a mile offshore as the shoal water extends a long way outside the sand heads. Another closer alternative is 200 metres southeast of The Ness. Both provide good sand holding and in the right conditions make for a good tide wait or overnight stay locations. Carry a riding light.


How to get in?
Teignmouth as seen from The Ness with Spratt Sand breaking
Image: Public Domain


Convergance Point Use southwestern England’s coastal overview from Portland Bill to Start Point Route location for seaward approaches. Teignmouth is located about midway between Exmouth and Torbay and a vessel keeping more than a ¼ of a mile off the shore will not encounter any dangers.


The entrance to Teignmouth between The Point and The Ness
Image: Michael Harpur


The entrance to the harbour can be readily identified by The Ness, a bold 50-metre high headland of red sandstone with pines at summit located on the south side of the entrance. A yellow can buoy, Fl Y 5s, marking the seaward end of outfall will be encountered 1.3 miles east by southeast of The Ness. Some racing buoys may also be encountered on closer approaches.


St. Michael's Tower and flagstaff as seen over the town
Image: Michael Harpur


St. Michael's Church, with a tower and flagstaff standing in the northeast part of the town, is also highly conspicuous from the approaches.


The Point at High Water
Image: Michael Harpur


Before making an approach on Teignmouth there are some points to note which may appear confusing and some other details that are worth checking with the Harbour Master:

  • • The 2FR Lights on the shore about 400 metres to the north-northeast of The Point and on the south end of The Den, bearing 334° should not be taken as leading lights. They show the dangers off the Ness and all vessels should keep well east of this line.

  • • The harbour pilots place additional buoys in the approaches that are changed regularly and used for commercial ship pilotage purposes. They have no navigational significance other than providing guidance marks for their use, i.e. they may not mark the edge of the fairway. However, they may prove useful from time to time so it is worth taking guidance from the Harbour Master regarding these.

  • • Check the situation with depth across the bar along the Harbour Master's alignment prior to entry.

  • • Check that no commercial vessels are exiting or entering for your planned approach. The active harbour has almost 500 coaster movements each year. Commercial shipping will be totally constrained by their draught so the channel has to be kept clear during these times.




Commercial vessel exiting Teignmouth
Image: Michael Harpur


The bar, which has been known to dry, lies between the drying southeast edge of Spratt Sand sandbank, on the north side and extending from The Point, and East Pole Sand, extending from the Ness, on the south side of the entrance. The sandbanks dry on either side to from -0.5 to -2.0 metres and the distance apart can be as little as 60 metres between them through which is normally a narrow channel. The harbour office intends to maintain their channel in this with a depth of 1 metre CD.
Please note

The area alter according to rough onshore weather and charts cannot be entirely relied upon to accurately show such shifts.



The tide is the real issue to be mindful of in the entrance as it has no great strength until near The Point. Expect an in-going stream of from ¼ to 1½ knots in the direction of the channel on The Bar. However at The Point, from half tide to nearly high water, it sweeps around at the rate of 4 to 5 knots, causing strong eddies near the beach on both sides. Inside The Point, at half tide, the flood flows over the east end of The Salty, and at or near high water makes nearly a straight course from The Point to the bridge in a northwest direction causing a cross set. This can even get lumpy with a westerly wind coming down the estuary so be prepared for a short burst of excitement and some determined steerage.

In much the same way the course of the ebb stream depends entirely upon the state of the tide. From the bridge, the first quarter ebb runs over the low part of The Salty for Shaldon pool, but as the tide falls, or a little after half ebb, it drives through the channel with considerable velocity, much influenced by the quantity of fresh water in the river. Even though the river is lit it is the strong tides that make it inadvisable for a stranger to make a night entry, or in daylight, to leave when ebb is running strongly.


The Ness and the Philip Lucette Light-beacon at high water with the seawall
covered

Image: Michael Harpur


Initial fix location From the initial fix it should be possible to pick up the 265° T transit of the Lucette Lighted Beacon, Oc.R.6s4m3M, front, situated on the training wall. It is located on the south or Shaldon side of the river, 250 metres west by northwest of The Ness. The Lucette mark should be brought between 2 white stripes painted on the seawall behind, just below the bus shelter, and this sets the 265° T transit that leads in across The Bar. The Harbour Authority aims to maintain a dredged channel with a least depth 1 metre above CD along this transit.

Following this alinement, with a maximum speed of 6kn on the approaches and 5kn off The Ness & Teignmouth beaches, passing:

  • • Between a green starboard, Fl.G.2s, and a red port buoy, Fl.R.2s, that mark the outer entrance to the channel.

  • • South of a green conical buoy, Fl G 2s, located inside the bar.

  • • North of the Philip Lucette Light-beacon situated on the middle of the training wall. Best water can be found here on the south side of the entrance abreast of the training wall.


Latticework starboard light-beacon as seen from The Point
Image: Michael Harpur

  • • Turn northwest from Lucette, tending to stay in the deeper water in the middle of the bend of the river entrance to pass close south of The Point, marked near its southwest extremity of a green latticework starboard light-beacon, OC.G.6s&F.G.(vert) with a tide gauge.

  • • At Shaldon Pool, close southwest of The Point where depths of up to 9 metres will be found, the tide will be running strongest. Steer hard northward with some power to follow the channel as it bends north by northeast.

  • • Continue between The Salty, a hard bank of gravel and sand on the west side, and The Point for circa 400 metres to the visitor pontoon. This section is marked by two lit port buoy and one starboard Fl.R.2s, Fl.G.2s, Fl.R.2s in sequence marking the deep channel.


The run up to the pontoons from inside the entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


From The Point there is at least 2.7 metres as far as the commercial wharves. The visitor pontoons are moored in the river on the starboard side of the channel just beyond the second port buoy, Fl.R.2s, and about 100 metres south of the New Quay.

Teignmouth visitor pontoons
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Beth where possible, rafting is permitted. Monitor the tides on approaches as it tends to set across the berths. Vessels rafting on the outside should use strong docking lines as the tidal streams in the harbour run strong especially for last half of the ebb. Contact the harbour master as soon as possible.
Please note

It may be difficult to slip the berth because of the cross tide. If you are experiencing some difficulty the Harbour Master is delighted to help.




Teignmouth visitor pontoons
Image: Michael Harpur


Land by tender on the beach or at the public landing steps and pontoon are on the Fish Quay which is to the side of the New Quay Inn. This is a 'short stay' pontoon that is intended as a facility to put people ashore easily. It is requested that anyone using this landing area should mover the tender off within a short time. It is really a 'set down' facility that is used extensively by the local Angling or Diving boats.

Fish Quay and New Quay
Image: Michael Harpur



Why visit here?
Teignmouth, first recorded in 1253 as Tengemutha when it was granted a charter for a market, derives its name is from its river. Teign is a Celtic word derived from Téag, meaning ‘sweeper flooder’, and when joined with the Old English ‘mútha' it aptly means 'mouth of the sweeping flooder'.

Settlements go back much earlier than this as, historically, villages and then towns grew up at the mouth of most rivers of any size. Evidence of Saxon settlement here dates back to at least 682. A battle was recorded to have occurred between the Ancient Britons and Saxons at Haldon in 927 and further Danish raids were recorded to have occurred on the River Teign estuary in 1001.

The New Quay at Teignmouth in 1827
Image: Public Domain
The town originally developed as two villages, East and West Teignmouth, separated by a stream called the Tame, which emptied into the Teign through marshland by the current fish quay. Neither village is mentioned in the Domesday Book, but East Teignmouth was recorded being granted a market by charter in 1253 and one for West Teignmouth followed a few years later. East Teignmouth possessed the Church of St Michael as early as 1044 which was granted by Edward the Confessor to Leofric, bishop of Exeter, and an allusion to salterers in the same grant proves the existence of the salt industry at that date.

In 1272, when Edward I came to the throne, Teignmouth was a little fishing town and was just beginning to establish itself as a port mainly been used for local activity. The meeting of river and sea provided a site for a harbour including quays and safe anchorages, with the river itself offering a route inland. In 1326, the threat of invasion called for all ships over 50 tons to be called for service. Teignmouth supplied 8 such ships and 163 men. This was the second highest in the county which indicate that Teignmouth by then must have been a significant port then, second in Devon only to Dartmouth. It was attacked by French pirates in 1340 who razed it to the ground. The village had its retaliation when it sent 7 ships and 120 men to the expedition against Calais in 1347.


The esplanade with Den Crescent and the Assembly Rooms behind, circa 1860
Image: Public Domain


Teignmouth’s relative importance waned during the 15th-century, and it did not figure in an official record of 1577 in the 16th-century. This may have been due to silting up of the harbour caused by tin mining on Dartmoor. This and its unusual navigation that serves to make mariners nervous to this day, the shifting sandbar and the fast flowing tidal streams at The Point. These aspects would have been particularly concerning for vessels relying on sail although many sailing ships would have been towed in and out of the harbour by a rowing boat.


The esplanade with Den Crescent and the Assembly Rooms behind, circa 1860
Image: Public Domain


Teignmouth was growing fast again during the 17th century. Clay had started to be exported from the Teign Valley and where it once had been taken on horseback from the Bovey Basin to Exeter or Topsham, now it travelled by horse-drawn barge to East Teignmouth. Many traders started to favour Teignmouth as its tolls were much less than what was charged by the ports of the River Exe. Wool was also being exported from West Teignmouth and it is possible that smuggling was the town's hidden but most significant trade at this time, though cod fishing in Newfoundland was also of great importance. In the latter part of the century, the Lords of the two town Manors, East and West Teignmouth, were to suffer greatly during the Civil War in England, for both had been royalists. Then in 1690, Teignmouth saw the last invasion of Britain when French troops landed on English soil to attack the town.

A Broad Gauge Train leaving Teignmouth with Shaldon Bridge and the Ness in the
background, circa 1854

Image: Public Domain
At the time French Admiral Anne Hilarion de Tourville, who had defeated an Anglo-Dutch fleet at the Battle of Beachy Head Click to view haven, anchored his fleet in Torbay. On the day after Beachy Head, which remains to this day one of the biggest defeats of the British navy, William of Orange decisively defeated Louis' ally, King James II, at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. Possibly enraged one hearing the news of this defeat some of Tourville's galley travelled up to Teignmouth. The Lord Lieutenant, from the inhabitants, described what then occured ... on the 26th day of this instant July 1690 by Foure of the clocke in the morning, your poor petitioners were invaded to the number of 1,000 or thereabouts, who in the space of three hours tyme, burnt down to the ground the dwelling houses of 240 persons of our parish and upwards, plundered and carried away all our goods, defaced our churches, burnt ten of our ships in the harbour, besides fishing boats, netts and other fishing craft ...


East Teignmouth in the mid 19th-century
Image: Public Domain
The most remarkable fact about the incursion, despite the general ransack, fire and destruction, no lives were lost. Soo after Tourville returned to Le Havre to refit and land his sick having entirely failed to exploit his naval victory. Louis was so furious with the turn of events, and seeing the burning of the town as symbolic of futility, he relieved Tourville of command. Back in England, a church brief was authorised for the collection of £11,000 for the aid of the town. Churches from as far afield as Yorkshire contributed and the collections enabled the further development of the port. All the original buildings that were destroyed were rebuilt and some still remain today. The only building that survived the fire was the Jolly Sailor situated near to the docks today.


Teignmouth Pier
Image: Public Domain


The Newfoundland fisheries continued to provide the main employment into the early 19th-century when, most fortuitously for the town, as the fisheries declined the prospect of tourism arose during Georgian times. Initially, Teignmouth Pier was a landing stage to enable steamboat passengers to get to the shore. In 1787 a tea house was then built on the Den which was an area of level ground facing the beach where the local fishermen dried their nets. Tourists soon took to lounging outside the tea house captivated by the fishermen pulling the nets out to dry, or more to point the muscular women who hauled nets, then known as the ‘Amazons of Shaldon, who were described as being ‘naked to the knee’. By 1803 Teignmouth was described as a ‘fashionable watering place and the resort had firmly established itself as a popular seaside destination by 1817. By 1825, Den Crescent had the central collonaded Assembly Rooms, which was later a cinema, and a crescent of three-storey houses had been built with balconies and sea-view windows that provided views all the way to Portland Bill on a clear day.


Teignmouth's Back (River) Beach as seen from the south
Image: Michael Harpur


Devon maps from this period show Teignmouth in large and bold letters and nearby Torquay marked as Torre in small letters. The railway arrived in 1846 brought with it the Victorians who came to escape the ‘big smoke’ cities they lived and worked in so they may ‘get away for their ails. A two mile esplanade was constructed and The Pier was built in 1865 which initially served to segregate male and female bathers. Teignmouth was well on its way to being the successful resort that it is today. Its seaward side facing onto the glorious sweep of the bay, with houses running down to the water’s edge on the opposite Teignmouth estuary and River Back Beach.


Teignmouth's sandy beach and beach huts
Image: Michael Harpur


In the 20th-century Teignmouth will be remembered by cruisers to be the homeport of Donald Crowhurst (1932 – July 1969) and his boat Teignmouth Electron. For those who do not know the story, he was a businessman and amateur sailor who entered the single-handed, round-the-world Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. His hope was that a win would publicise and change the fortunes of his Navicator radio detection finder business and that the cash prize would save it from bankruptcy. But the unseasoned weekend sailor, in an equally untested and unprepared vessel, quickly encountered difficulty. He then secretly abandoned the race while reporting false positions, in an attempt to appear to complete a circumnavigation without actually circling the world. The boat was by chance found adrift in the Atlantic and log evidence suggest that this attempt ended in mental breakdown, possible insanity and suicide.


Teignmouth's seaward beach
Image: Public Domain


Today the town is popular with families and young children, where there are picturesque beach huts, quiet sheltered waters, soft sand, and coloured fishing boats bobbing on the tide. Though bombed during the second world war the town retains much of its historic features. St Michael's church in East Teignmouth, rebuilt in 1824, retains a Norman doorway and other ancient portions of St James', in West Teignmouth, the south porch and tower are Norman. French Street with its museum, named in memory of the last invasion of England remembers the event. Historic Georgian buildings are plenty and Teignmouth's Victorian pier is one of only two piers left on the southwest coast of England. But what the town retains most is its resort feel with its stunning beaches, pier, fresh local food and, above all, its rolling carnival atmosphere.


Teignmouth is full of activity
Image: Michael Harpur


From a sailing point of view, Teignmouth needs careful timing for an entry, but it is truly a wonderful place to visit for it is seaside fun personified. For a family boat, this is one of the best locations to visit on the south English coast. If you don't have family aboard, don't worry, pop across to the Ship Inn, 100 metres from the visitor pontoons, have a pint and stick your toes in the sand and take in all the action.


Come ashore, unfold a deck chair and let it all happen
Image: Michael Harpur


If the riot of activity all becomes too much, with the aid of a stalwart outboard, cross over to the much more sedate village of Shaldon, just across the estuary, that is said to be the prettiest village in Devon. Alternatively, the upper river estuary extends three miles up to Newton Abbot from Shaldon Bridge. This is an outstanding stretch of the river and is well worth a trip. There are public landing steps at the Newton Abbot town quay, which can be approached on the top of the tide. From a boat perspective, it is an ideal place to provision, attend to some repairs or change crew via its excellent transport links. So there is something for everyone here.


What facilities are available?
A freshwater tap is situated at Polly Steps. There are public showers and toilets below the Beachcomber Café opposite the pier which is a short distance from the river beach which are free of charge. These are open between 8 am and 8 pm during the high season (May to Sept) and 9 am to 6 pm during the low season (Oct-April).

Brunswick Street has public toilets open during daylight hours. Near the lifeboat station on the lower level of The Point car park toilets and are open during daylight hours. A Launderette is available on Brunswick Street which is open from 7 am until 6 pm seven days a week P:+44 1626 770703.

Diesel and petrol are available in the town and can be obtained by Jerry Can from Tesco Express which is a 15-minute' walk from the harbour and Morrisons which is a further 10-minute walk. Large quantities by arrangement with a fuel tanker. There are a number of bins provided for the disposal of rubbish. Limited oil disposal facilities are available at Polly Steps. The key is held at the Harbour Office. The town has a chandler, Seaquest Marine P:+ 441626 879977 that exchanges Calor Gas. A scrubbing hard can be found on the south side of New Quay

There are two public launching sites within the town. The main site is at Polly Steps which is just upriver from the docks and is accessed via the rear of the dock complex. This is a concrete slipway and has facilities for parking of cars £5 per day (2017) and trailers £10 per day run by Teignbridge District Council. During the summer toilets and fresh water are available. Launching is restricted at low water. The second site at Gales Hill beach is situated immediately downriver from the dock complex.

The town has many engineers and electronic repair capabilities in its boatyard and specialist service providers.

Boatyards:

Riverside, Teignmouth 01626 772324 + repairs
Shaldon Marine 07521 047986
Mariners Weigh, Shaldon 01626 873698 + repairs

Repairs:

Addicott Electrics (Teignmouth) 01626 774987
BT Marine Propellers 01626 778008
GEMS Marine (Teignmouth) 07790 018497
Mechanical/Servicing 01626 879879
Seaworthy Marine 01626 879977 / 07788774997
Teign Dive Centre 01626 773965 / 07971 293011

Transport:

Teignmouth has a wide range of shops, supermarkets and small outlets in the town where fresh provisions can be obtained. There are also many interesting pubs and wine bars as well as plenty of places for eating out or takeaway. All are within an easy walking distance of the harbour and river beach.

Buses connecting Teignmouth to the main towns in Devon area available from the centre of the town and runs approximately every 15-20 minutes on weekdays and Saturday and every 30-45 minutes on a Sunday. The main bus route which passes through the town is Number 2 bus that travels from Exeter through to Newton Abbot and back. There is also the number 22 bus which travels to Torquay and back via Shaldon. This bus stops outside the Seaview Diner and Post office.

Teignmouth train station is a short 5-minute walk from the harbour with regular links to all major cities, plus a full local service with trains running every 15-30 minutes on a weekday and Saturday and one every hour on a Sunday.

Exeter International Airport is just 18 miles away.


With thanks to:
eOceanic


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




Teignmouth, Devon, England
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Teignmouth's Ship Inn
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Dinghy moorings off Teignmouth's Back (River) Beach
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Teignmouth's Back (River) Beach
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Bobbing boats Teignmouth's Back (River) Beach
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Bobbing boats Teignmouth's Back (River) Beach
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Children at play at the Back (River) Beach
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Teignmouth shows its Georgian legacy
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Boats on the beach near The Point
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Beach hut near The Point
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Small boat exiting under The Ness
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Masonry groyne near the head of The Point
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


The stone tower front mark of the bearing 334° showing the dangers off the Ness
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


The stone tower front mark at dusk
Image: eOceanic thanks Public Domain

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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.