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Scraggane Bay

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Overview





Scraggane Bay is located on the west coast of Ireland on the north side of the Dingle Peninsula, Co. Kerry. It is a remote anchorage on the tip of the headland that separates Tralee Bay from Brandon Bay where there is a small fishing pier.

The anchorage offers good protection from all conditions except from the northeast. It can be subject to northwest swell when its outer fringing rocks cover at high water. In such cases Fenit, less than ten miles away, provides all round protection. Access to Scraggane Bay is straightforward in daylight at any stage of the tide.



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Keyfacts for Scraggane Bay
Facilities
Water available via tapShop with basic provisions availableShore based toilet facilities


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: overfalls, tidal rips or breakers in the vacinity

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3 metres (9.84 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
May 15th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapShop with basic provisions availableShore based toilet facilities


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: overfalls, tidal rips or breakers in the vacinity



Position and approaches
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Haven position

52° 18.624' N, 010° 2.000' W

This is the position of the head of the pier that is situated in the northwest end of Scraggane Bay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Scraggane Bay initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 19.080' N, 010° 1.640' W
This is on the 10 metre contour south of the south eastern extremity of Illauntannig Island and is immediately outside the mouth of the bay. A course of due south, for 300 metres, leads into the bay.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Scraggane Bay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Illauntannig - 0.7 miles NNE
  2. Castlegregory - 1.9 miles SSE
  3. Brandon Bay - 3.3 miles WSW
  4. Barrow Harbour - 3.7 miles E
  5. Fenit Harbour - 4.2 miles ESE
  6. Dingle Harbour - 8.5 miles SW
  7. Smerwick Harbour - 9 miles WSW
  8. Kilbaha Bay - 10.4 miles NNE
  9. Ventry Harbour - 10.5 miles SW
  10. Ross Bay - 10.9 miles NNE
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Illauntannig - 0.7 miles NNE
  2. Castlegregory - 1.9 miles SSE
  3. Brandon Bay - 3.3 miles WSW
  4. Barrow Harbour - 3.7 miles E
  5. Fenit Harbour - 4.2 miles ESE
  6. Dingle Harbour - 8.5 miles SW
  7. Smerwick Harbour - 9 miles WSW
  8. Kilbaha Bay - 10.4 miles NNE
  9. Ventry Harbour - 10.5 miles SW
  10. Ross Bay - 10.9 miles NNE
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


How to get in?
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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Scraggane Bay is located at the head of the peninsula that separates Brandon Bay
from Tralee Bay

Image: © William Glasgow Howe


Scraggane Bay located within a bight at the head of the peninsula that lies directly south of Illauntannig and separates Brandon Bay from Tralee Bay. There is a pier on the west side with two slipways. The small village of Fahamore, on the Brandon Bay side of the peninsula, is accessible via a short walk from Scraggane Bay pier. It provides an anchorage amongst fishing boats plus a pier.


Initial fix location From the Scraggane Bay initial fix head south into the bay. The bay is entered between Doonagaun Island, a small island off the north end of Scraggane Point on the west side, and the reefs and shallows that extend from Rough Point on the east side. Rough Point may be also distinguished by an old telegraph tower standing on the point and Doonagaun Island is low but always visible. Doonagaun Island has deep water close by and it is best to prefer this side of the entrance keeping between 100 and 200 metres off the island upon approach.

Once inside the entrance proceed south for ¼ of a mile to anchor outside of the moored fishing vessels.

Anchor according to draught and conditions. 2 metres will be found with the pierhead bearing 287° and the east side of Illauntannig bearing 023°. 3 metres can be found 150 metres east from the pier and shallower draft vessels will find about 1 metre with swinging room just southeast of the pier.

Continuing further southward of the pier requires a high great degree of care. A reef of large boulders extends from the pier to occupy the southwest corner of the bay. Likewise, a shoal occupies nearly the entire southern half of the bay with a small central part awash at low water springs.

The anchorage as seen from the pier
Image: © Dwane Doyle


Haven location The pier and slip are actively used by fishermen mooring and slipping large lobster crates. The lobster crates are generally moored, almost submerged, off the pier and amongst the fishing vessels. There is also a very active dive school operating from the pier. As the pier is busy, subject to swell, and has a foul bottom it should be avoided by leisure craft. It does provide a very good slip for landing provided a sharp watch is maintained for lobster crates.
Please note

Occasional gusts may come down from the mountains. Some swell may enter the harbour when the outer reefs, that lie between Scraggane Point and Doonagaun, cover at high water.



Slip at Scraggane pier
Image: Terry Ballard



What's the story here?
Scraggane Bay, in Irish An Scragán or "Scraggies", as it is colloquially known, is a small fishing port that is home to a fleet of about twenty fishing trawlers. The main local catch consists of lobster, flat-back crab, spider crab, Atlantic crayfish, Atlantic salmon and mackerel.


Visitors will also see the unusual aspect of this fleet, as nearly all the fishermen use traditional Irish curraghs for trawler tenders. This is because the master curragh builder Monty O'Leary is located across the peninsula, in Fahamore, busily constructing curraghs, or Naomhóg.


The Curraghs of Ireland from Mariner's Mirror, 1938
Image: CC0


The traditional curragh was constructed with ribs made of sally rods with the ends being brought up through holes in a strong gunwale frame. Over the ribs were placed longitudinal pieces of thin deal and this was then covered with canvas or hides. This was all then blackened and made water-tight with bitumen (tar). The ancient boats could be managed with great dexterity as the traditional design provided qualities that are only seen today in modern craft made from advanced technologies. The boat’s elasticity enabled a curragh to recoil from a shock that would stove-in a heavy structured vessel and their lightness provided such buoyancy that they floated like ducks on the water.

These craft are still in use today but are more likely to have an outer skin of fibreglass to replace the hide. They still look delicate but are surprisingly strong and resilient when used on the often rough Atlantic coast. Having the boats constructed in the area has made this bay a centre for curragh enthusiasts and this love of the boats reaches a climax each July. Then the bay hosts a currach racing regatta where currach racing teams from Ireland’s entire western seaboard, from Kerry to Galway, come to compete in the All-Ireland Currach racing series.

An Irish fisherman using a Curragh
Image: Terry Ballard


Fahamore derives its name from the Irish An Faiche Mor meaning ‘The Big Green’; a reference to the big open space in front of the famous Spillane’s Pub. The local economy of the village and bay area is underpinned by tourism through holiday home rentals, pubs and restaurants, and particularly for watersport enthusiasts as Scraggane Bay is used extensively for flat water windsurfing. The areas consistent wind and protection from the Atlantic waves makes it sailable in almost any condition, regardless of wind direction. This capability was recently observed by the Sunday Times when it voted it the No.1 windsurfing destination in the World. Scuba diving, sea angling and walking are other popular leisure activities here. Those who enjoy a hike should plan a visit to the 14ft high standing stone with a cross situated in a field at Candiha at the southern end of the bay.

From a cruising perspective, Scraggane Bay is another interesting and very pleasant anchoring opportunity in this area of outstanding natural beauty. For when the sun shines here, this area looks more like the Caribbean than the west coast of Ireland.


What facilities are available?
There is a water tap on the pier outside a basic but well cared for public lavatory. The small village of Fahamore, at Brandon Bay less than 10 minutes’ walk, has pubs and some basic shopping serving about 50 houses.


Any security concerns?
Never an incident known to have occurred in Scraggane Bay.


With thanks to:
Mark Murray, Yacht 'Motivator'.


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