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Youghal

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Overview





Youghal is a historic port town located on the south coast of Ireland, on the Waterford / Cork border, and just inside a river estuary. There is an anchorage off the town quay basin that dries plus an alternate anchorage on the opposite side of the river.

Complete protection from all conditions may be found in the estuary. With strong southerly conditions a roll tends to develop in the anchorage off the town quay but at such times shelter may be easily obtained by moving to the opposite side of the river. Although there are many obstructions in Youghal Bay, including a bar outside the entrance, two well-marked channels lead across it providing straight forward access night or day.
Please note

southerly winds raise a heavy sea in Youghal Bay. Neither channel should be approached in south-easterly or southerly conditions in anything above force five. The entrance is subject to strong tidal currents and it is best to arrive here on the flood and depart on the ebb.




1 comment
Keyfacts for Youghal
HM  +353 87 2511143     Moorings  +353 868 050726      Ch.12
Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Now Force

Summary

A completely protected location with attentive navigation required for access.

LWS draught

3 metres (9.84 feet).

Today's tide estimates

LW 00:30 (0.2m) HW 06:56 (4m)
LW 13:27 (0.1m) HW 19:20 (4m)
We are now on Springs

Swell today




Approaches
3 stars: Attentive navigation; daylight access with dangers that need attention.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity
Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area

Last modified
May 30th 2017; suggest a correction?

Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 57.114' N, 007° 50.548' W

Off the town basin beside the Town Hall.

What are the initial fixes?

The following waypoints will set up a final approach:

(i) Youghal West Bar initial fix

51° 54.855' N, 007° 50.380' W

This waypoint is 1.7 nautical miles out from the sectored light in the middle of the white sector, of the West channel. It is 400 metres west of the Bar Rocks Cardinal Marker and a course of 360° (T) from here leads into the entrance.

(ii) Youghal East Bar initial fix

51° 55.835' N, 007° 48.530' W

This waypoint is 1.7 nautical miles out from the sectored light in the middle of the white sector, of the East channel. It is half a mile north of the Blackball Ledge cardinal marker and a course of 300° (T) from here leads into the entrance.
Please note

Initial fixes only set up their listed targets. Do not plan to sail directly between initial fixes as a routing sequence.




What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in the westbound Route location or eastbound Route location sequenced 'Rosslare to Cork' coastal description; southern approaches may use either description.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Youghal for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Knockadoon Harbour - 2.5 miles SSW
  2. Ardmore Bay - 2.9 miles E
  3. Ballycotton - 5.9 miles SW
  4. Dungarvan Town Quay - 7.3 miles NE
  5. Helvick - 7.8 miles ENE
  6. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 7.9 miles NE
  7. Northeast of Great Island - 8.7 miles WSW
  8. East Ferry Marina - 9.1 miles WSW
  9. Aghada - 9.3 miles WSW
  10. Cuskinny - 10.4 miles WSW
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Knockadoon Harbour - 2.5 miles SSW
  2. Ardmore Bay - 2.9 miles E
  3. Ballycotton - 5.9 miles SW
  4. Dungarvan Town Quay - 7.3 miles NE
  5. Helvick - 7.8 miles ENE
  6. Ballynacourty (The Pool) - 7.9 miles NE
  7. Northeast of Great Island - 8.7 miles WSW
  8. East Ferry Marina - 9.1 miles WSW
  9. Aghada - 9.3 miles WSW
  10. Cuskinny - 10.4 miles WSW
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


How to get in?
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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Youghal, pronounced yawl is a seaside resort town situated at the head of Youghal Bay, in the estuary of the River Blackwater. Being built on the western edge of what is a steep riverbank, the historically strategic town has a distinctive long and narrow layout. Its comparatively small harbour consists of a number of quays fronting the town.

The town is entered over a bar from Youghal Bay. The bay has many dangers and little shelter and a close examination of the chart alongside the coastal description is highly recommended.



Youghal Bay is entered between Knockadoon Head, with Capel Island situated immediately offshore, and Ram Head that is located about 7 miles northeast.



Towers stand on Ram Head and Capel Island making them readily identifiable. Youghal Harbour is located at the head of the bay and set within the mouth of the River Blackwater. The entrance opens between high bluff shores and is easily recognised in daylight.

The approach to the harbour is encumbered by rocks, which are marked by buoys, and a bar. ‘The Bar’ is composed of sand and has as little as 1.5 metres of water over it. It sweeps round the entrance of the harbour, between East Point and Molly Goggin’s Corner, in the form of a horse-shoe.



Two channels cross the bar, known as the East and West Bars. Both channels are supported at night by a sectored light situated on the western side of the entrance. The light sectors are as follows; White 183°-273° (90°).Red 273°-295° (22°).White 295°-307° (12°). Red 307°-351° (44°). White 351°-003° (12°)

Youghal - Fl WR 2.5s 24m 17/13M position 51° 56.571'N, 007° 50.535'W

Leisure vessels may choose either the East or West channel of which the East is thought to be the better.
Please note

Vessels approaching from the west, and intending to cross the Youghal West Bar, may find the better sailing approach with the wind from that quarter. The East Bar has slightly more water. It is best to plan to come in to Youghal on the tide and exit on the ebb. It may get a bit rough at the mouth of the harbour when the ebb strikes a southerly. With offshore winds and in moderate weather it is possible to anchor to wait for the tide on the south side of the bay. With northerly winds vessels may anchor half a mile offshore off Whiting Bay in 10 or 12 metres where a sandy bottom will be found.





Initial fix location Vessels approaching from the west, and intending to cross the Youghal West Bar, may round Cable Island at any convenient distance, then haul up north to the West Bar initial fix that is set 200 metres to the west of the Bar Rocks Cardinal.

Bar Rocks – South Cardinal Q (6) + LFl 15s position: 51° 54.855'N, 007° 50.053'W

Pass the Bar Rocks marker to starboard, by night entering the white sector of the Youghal Light. It marks a patch of rocks a third of a mile north by northeast with 0.6 metres over them at low water. They consist of three irregular patches extending 800 metres in length, and 100 metres wide. From there continue in to pass the West Bar that has a least depth of 1.8 metres situated just under a mile south of the lighthouse.


Initial fix location Vessels approaching from the east, and intending to cross the East Bar, should use Youghal East Bar initial fix set half a mile north of the Blackball East Cardinal.

Blackball – East Cardinal Q (3) 10s position: 51° 55.334'N, 007° 48.529'W

This cardinal marks a ledge on the outer edge of the bay called Black Ball Ledge. It has 3.4 metres at low water over it and is there for the benefit of commercial shipping.

The east channel, running closely along the north shore, is considered the best channel as it is the deeper of the two with a least charted depth of 2.8 metres. Stay in the channel however as a shallow 1.8 metres section lies immediately south of the channel and is located a mile to the southwest of the East Point.

The initial fixes are both set 1.7 nautical miles out from the sectored light and in the middle of the white sectors. From either point proceeding towards the lighthouse, and sectored light, will lead to the entrance that will be plainly seen all the way.

Convergance Point Once across the bars the water deepens to 3 metres, and then 6 to 7 metres in the entrance fairway of the harbour.



A vessel should then steer along the western shore of the estuary, keeping off a distance of 150 metres.



Although the channel appears wide, it is narrow and all the depth is on the town side of the river. The east side of the channel dries in the area located to the south of Ferry Point, off the eastern shore, and the very shallow Dutchman’s Ballast lies south of this drying area.




Haven location The harbour consists of a number of quays fronting the town on the west bank of the river. There are three primary places to anchor.
(i) Off the town at Buttimer Quay beside the Town Hall
(ii) Upriver of the town quay alongside the Red Bank
(iii) North of Ferry Point where the yacht club is located.



The first is off the town basin, Buttimer Quay, beside the Town Hall, where it is possible to come ashore and land the dinghy in the basin. The bottom of this ancient anchorage is foul and the use of a tripping line is highly advisable. This location offers convenient access to the town but it can get rough here in a southerly. More so with wind on tide and especially so on a Spring ebb.



The Town Quay has a pontoon adjacent to the pier for charter boats, that can be used on occasions for loading and obtaining water, at night it is marked by a light (FR). In the northern harbour a local sailing school has a pontoon that is identified by a special mark with Fl Y 4s and it is best to seek local advice regarding this.
Please note

Expect a fast running tide alongside the town quays that can make anchoring difficult. Expect spring rates of to attain up to 2.6 knots.





A quieter berthing option is to proceed beyond the Town Quays and Green’s Quay to the area west of the Red Bank. Vessels continuing up to this area should take a mid-channel approach to pass a drying bank that lies 100 metres east of Green Quay.



Although it is possible to anchor out to the northeast of Green’s Quay it is best to head up to the area just northwest of the Pontoon Marker. Ships use Green’s Quay with surprising frequency and they turn about the bank to come alongside the north end of the quay. Any vessels anchored in this area will either impede the turn or at least be disturbed by the wash from the movement. It is far better to be well out of the way of these ship movements.



In the event of strong southerlies there is the option to anchor in quieter waters north of Ferry Point. This is on the opposite shore at the north side of the point where the yacht club is situated. It is truly a great place to spend a night but this location takes a little sounding out to find. There is a hole of water here no bigger than a hundred metres wide with about 8 metres depth. It is something that requires some depth sounder work but once located it is an ideal place to settle down in perfect security and away from the noise of the town.

Two visitor moorings are available in the harbour, one off the jetty and one off the big apartment block. These are provided by Aquatrek Sea Skills the local ISA/RYA training centre. For details (daytime) contact John Griffin Mobile +353 868 050726 or John Innes Mobile +353 868593482



Upriver from Youghal the River Blackwater is famed for the picturesque beauty of its banks. Although possessing considerable natural advantages it is little used for navigation as about a mile above the town a bridge spans the river with a vertical clearance of 6.5 metres. Vessels with a low airdraft that draw up to 3.7 metres can reach Strancally Castle, located 9 miles above Youghal, where they may lie afloat. As the tide in this part of the river maintains a rise of 4 metres on springs, vessels may ascend above Camphire to Dromana, where there are some deep gullies, with from 3 to 3.5 metres of water.


What's the story here?
Youghal derives its name from the Irish Eochaill meaning "yew woods", which were once plentiful in the area. Set into the estuary of the River Blackwater and standing on the downward slopes of the hills on the west side of the harbour, this is a town of considerable antiquity of which a sizable majority is still well preserved today.

Evidence of early human occupation dates back to the Neolithic period as can be discerned by the findings at nearby Newport. Many of the buildings of the town date back to the 5th century. The Church of Coran, thought to have been founded by St Declan around 450 in the town's western suburbs, and St Mary's Collegiate Church date back to then. The church was rebuilt in Irish Romanesque style circa 750, and a great Norman nave was erected in circa 1220. It is one of the few remaining medieval churches in Ireland to have remained in continuous use as a place of worship.

From the end of the 8th century Ireland’s coastline was subject to Viking raids and Youghal was no exception. During the 9th century it is thought that a Viking settlement was established here. They used it as a base to execute raids on the monastic sites along the south coast of Ireland. This settlement is likely to have been small and may not have been a permanent foundation. It would have been well fortified and probably contained a church. It was however far from insurmountable and in 864 it is known to have been attacked and destroyed by the powerful Deisi clan. Today a stone in St Mary's Collegiate Church still bears a historic etched outline of a longboat that dates back to the period.

In 1173 a sea battle took place at the mouth of the River Blackwater. A fleet of Irish and Vikings clashed with Normans returning to their Waterford base with stolen plunder from Lismore. The Irish and Vikings were defeated and the Norman period began in Youghal. In 1177 King Henry II gave the Youghal area to Robert Fitzstephen, who in 1215 passed it on to his half-brother Maurice Fitzgerald ancestor of the Earls of Desmond. The property was conveyed to the Earls of Ormond in the 14th Century and passed back to the Earls of Desmond in 1420. The town was granted a charter of incorporation around 1209 and soon attracted settlers from Britain. By 1350 Youghal was a fine walled town and one of the main medieval ports in Ireland that traded with ports all over Europe.

By then the town walls, with at least 12 towers, surrounded the important settlement. The walls date from at least the 13th century; as early as 1275 King Edward I granted a charter to raise taxes for their repair and extension. In 1462 Youghal was created one of the Irish 'cinque ports' granting the town special military and trading privileges. Various other privileges were given to Youghal during the medieval period, confirming it as one of the principal ports in Ireland, and it was a port capable of provisioning vessels of all types. A beacon tower was constructed in the late 12th century to the south of the town and the light was tended by the nearby Franciscan convent of St. Anne.

The town was badly damaged on November 13th 1579 during the Second Desmond Rebellion, when it was sacked by the forces of Gerald Fitzgerald, 15th Earl of Desmond. Desmond had the town's garrison massacred and English officials hanged, and his soldiers then looted the town. It was Sir Walter Raleigh that came to suppress this rebellion and in return for his success Queen Elizabeth I granted him large tracts of land in the Youghal area. He received 40,000 acres which included the important towns of Youghal and Lismore making him one of the principal landowners of Munster. Youghal was the home of Sir Walter Raleigh for short periods during the seventeen years in which he held land in Ireland.

Amongst his acquaintances in the area was the poet Edmund Spenser who, like Raleigh, had been granted land in Munster. They both had limited success in inducing English tenants to settle on their Irish estates. Sir Walter Raleigh is however credited with introducing the potato to Ireland. As noted by Nicholas Hilliard, circa 1585 ’’Sir Walter Raleigh was Mayor of Youghal in 1588 and 1599 and lived at Myrtle Grove, the Warden's Residence of the Collegiate Church. The first potatoes in Europe were planted in the gardens of Myrtle Grove in 1585. Myrtle Grove's South Gable is where Edmund Spencer is reputed to have written part of his poem The Faerie Queen. The house is not open to the public, except during the summer months when tours are organised.’’ Another incident recalls how Raleigh was smoking, in the garden of Myrtle Grove, when his servant, never having seen tobacco before, threw water over him fearing that he had been set alight.

This is only a taste of the town’s history that has been designated an Irish Heritage Port by the Irish Tourist Board. This is very fitting as the down town area of Youghal is a treasure trove of historic buildings and monuments all set within ancient town walls that are among the best preserved in Ireland.
The walls are standing firm and the first record of these are in the charter of 1275, granted by King Edward I, for their repair and extension. In 1777, the town's Clock Gate was built on the site of Trinity Castle, part of the town's fortifications. The Clock Gate served the town as gaol and public gallows until 1837; prisoners were executed by being hanged from the windows. Tynte's Castle is a late 15th-century urban tower house. There are also 17th-century almshouses, constructed by Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork. The Collegiate Church of Ireland, St. Mary's Collegiate Church in the town,, still contains many monuments including the tomb of Richard Boyle himself. The Mall House and its promenade were built in 1779, and are now used as Youghal's Town Hall. The town's Water Gate was built in the 13th century to provide access through the town walls to the docks. Also known as Cromwell's Arch, it was from here that Oliver Cromwell left the country in 1650, having over-wintered in the town following his campaign in Ireland.

Built over a short space and on the edge of a steep riverbank, the town has a distinctive long and narrow layout that is a pleasure to experience on foot. The first stop should be to the tourist office so that a plan can be made to take full advantage of this historic town as there are a host of things to see. Youghal is also adjoined by a number of fine safe beaches with the 5km long front beach holding two Blue Flags for water quality.


What facilities are available?
Once alongside the main town you will be right in the centre of it for shopping. With a town catering for a population of about 7,000, and a catchment area about 10,000, it is an excellent location to provision. Bus Eireann operates a regular service from Youghal to Cork with buses leaving approximately every hour between 07:00 and 23:00. Cork Airport is the nearest airport in the region and is located about 40 minutes drive away from Youghal.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to a vessel anchored or on moorings in Youghal.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photographs: With thanks to John Finn, Raymond Norris, Will McGoldrick, David Brookes, John Berry, Montclaire Kimberley Acadamy, Eugene Mehegan and Youghal on Panoramio.


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The above plots are not precise and indicative only.










































This short video provides a taste of Youghal’s history.






Add your review or comment:


Rodolphe Thimonier wrote this review on Jun 19th 2016:

Nice anchorage almost in city center. Yet the anchorage North of Ferry Point is shallow and the best spots are already occupied by local boats. So, from a draft of 2m, you shall have to anchor almost in the middle of the river, where the tidal currents are strong (several knots on a spring tide) and the boat is exposed to southerly winds/swell. However, the holding is good and the place enjoyable.

Average Rating: ***

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