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Aughris Hole

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Overview






Please note

eOceanic has been made aware of this haven. We are looking for a sailor with first-hand experience to provide their direct personal insights so that we may complete our write up. In advance of this we have posted these preliminary research notes. Do you know this location? Please contact us or click the 'Report a Mistake or Omission' button below to help share this location with the sailing community.


Aughris hole is a small bay on the northwest coast of Ireland in County Sligo, on the east side of Aughris Head which has detached rocks, uncovered at low water, extending some distance to the westward of Carrickfadda rock, its eastern limit. A vessel should therefore anchor well over towards the western shore.

Aughris hole is a small bay on the northwest coast of Ireland in County Sligo, on the east side of Aughris Head which has detached rocks, uncovered at low water, extending some distance to the westward of Carrickfadda rock, its eastern limit. A vessel should therefore anchor well over towards the western shore.

It affords tolerable shelter to offshore winds, but is subject to a heavy ground swell with westerly gales. Due to the numerous rocks in and around the bay attentive navigation is required.



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Keyfacts for Aughris Hole



Last modified
May 30th 2017

Summary

A tolerable location with attentive navigation required for access.

Facilities
Hot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration



Position and approaches
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Haven position

54° 16.384' N, 008° 45.248' W

this is the position at the pier at Aughis harbour.

What is the initial fix?

The following Sligo initial fix will set up a final approach:
54° 18.188' N, 008° 41.669' W
This is at the centre of Sligo Bay between Raghly Point and Aughris Head



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Aughris Hole for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Brown Bay - 2.9 miles NE
  2. Ballysadare Bay - 3.6 miles ESE
  3. Rosses Point - 4.2 miles ENE
  4. Sligo - 6 miles E
  5. Inishmurray - 6.2 miles NNE
  6. Mullaghmore - 9.8 miles NE
  7. Kilcummin - 9.9 miles W
  8. Killala Bay - 10.2 miles WSW
  9. Teelin - 13.4 miles N
  10. White Strand Bay - 14.5 miles N
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Brown Bay - 2.9 miles NE
  2. Ballysadare Bay - 3.6 miles ESE
  3. Rosses Point - 4.2 miles ENE
  4. Sligo - 6 miles E
  5. Inishmurray - 6.2 miles NNE
  6. Mullaghmore - 9.8 miles NE
  7. Kilcummin - 9.9 miles W
  8. Killala Bay - 10.2 miles WSW
  9. Teelin - 13.4 miles N
  10. White Strand Bay - 14.5 miles N
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?
Route location The 'Erris Head to Malin Head' coastal description provides approach information to the suggested initial fix. Vessels approaching from the south should select the northeast bound Route location sequenced description; vessels approaching from the north should select the southwest bound Route location sequence; western approaches may use either description.

Aughris Hole is situated on the southern shore of Sligo Bay, located immediately to the east of Aughris Head, in County Sligo, on the west coast of Ireland.

Aughris Hole is a small inlet, open to the north, which lies between Dromore Bay and Ballysadare Bay, and provides shelter in offshore winds from the southeast to the southwest, but is subject to heavy groundswell in winds from the west particularly with the flood.

Having given Aughris Head a wide berth to avoid the fringing rocks along the coast, the shore is clean to the stone quay in Aughris Hole. This is used by the local fishermen, and off which there is an anchorage in 2.7 metres in sand and stones. The quay gives no protection from the troublesome west winds and no yacht should attempt to go alongside, but in calm conditions it is suitable for a dinghy landing and has an improved slipway alongside. It is advisable to anchor well over towards the west shore in order to avoid detached rocks which extend some distance from Carrickfadda on the east side of the entrance. At low water a ridge of stone and rock protects the anchorage from the east, but it is important to note that submerged rocks extend halfway from this ridge to the west shore.


Why visit here?
Aughris, Irish : Eachrois meaning 'point of the horses', is a small settlement on the western shore of Aughris Bay. Now largely abandoned, the tiny clachan-type village is located close to the coast and the remaining houses cluster near to the harbour and the pub. A clachan is a type of small traditional settlement usually defined as lacking a church, post office or other formal building, that most likely dates from medieval times and which is usually a cluster of small single storey cottages used by fishermen and farmers.

The small harbour is used by the local inshore fishermen, and the olde worlde traditional Irish pub is situated on unspoiled Aughris Beach with the Atlantic waves rolling in facing the front door and the Ox mountains overlooking the rear, whilst the peaks of Knocknarea and Benbulben complete for attention to the east. The pub with its thatched roof is a popular watering hole for the many keen anglers and walkers who visit the area.

The Aughris Cliff Walk is a 3 mile walk following a clearly defined path along an imposing cliff wall that offers amazing views. On the way you will see St. Patrick's well, and a variety of sea birds nesting on the cliff face, and although not a long walk it's great for a blast of clean fresh air.

Aughris Hole is ideal for a lunch time stop in suitable conditions, with the opportunity to get off the boat for a bracing walk and a spot of lunch and a drink at the pub. There are no other facilities available at this location, but the nearby villages of Skreen, Templeboy, and Dromore West on the main road have shops and a post office.

The West Sligo area is the part of County Sligo bordered by the Ox Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean, and is still part of the unspoilt North West which has so far escaped the over development and rapid urbanisation experienced by the more populous regions of Ireland. Sligo is a microcosm of all that Ireland has to offer, cliffs, mountains, lakes, lush green fields and boglands, and despite its proximity to both Ballina and Sligo City, West Sligo is a collection of delightful communities and villages along the Atlantic coastline which have retained all their charm and authenticity throughout centuries of political turmoil and change, and recent economic growth.


What facilities are available?
there are no facilities at this location except for the pub and restaurant. Further along the main road at the villages of Templeboy and Dromore West there are shops for provisions, a post office and a petrol filling station adjacent to a supermarket.


With thanks to:
inyourfootsteps.com site research.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.








The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with area around Aughris.

The following video presents a photo montage of various scenes around Aughris and the bay.



About Aughris Hole

Aughris, Irish : Eachrois meaning 'point of the horses', is a small settlement on the western shore of Aughris Bay. Now largely abandoned, the tiny clachan-type village is located close to the coast and the remaining houses cluster near to the harbour and the pub. A clachan is a type of small traditional settlement usually defined as lacking a church, post office or other formal building, that most likely dates from medieval times and which is usually a cluster of small single storey cottages used by fishermen and farmers.

The small harbour is used by the local inshore fishermen, and the olde worlde traditional Irish pub is situated on unspoiled Aughris Beach with the Atlantic waves rolling in facing the front door and the Ox mountains overlooking the rear, whilst the peaks of Knocknarea and Benbulben complete for attention to the east. The pub with its thatched roof is a popular watering hole for the many keen anglers and walkers who visit the area.

The Aughris Cliff Walk is a 3 mile walk following a clearly defined path along an imposing cliff wall that offers amazing views. On the way you will see St. Patrick's well, and a variety of sea birds nesting on the cliff face, and although not a long walk it's great for a blast of clean fresh air.

Aughris Hole is ideal for a lunch time stop in suitable conditions, with the opportunity to get off the boat for a bracing walk and a spot of lunch and a drink at the pub. There are no other facilities available at this location, but the nearby villages of Skreen, Templeboy, and Dromore West on the main road have shops and a post office.

The West Sligo area is the part of County Sligo bordered by the Ox Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean, and is still part of the unspoilt North West which has so far escaped the over development and rapid urbanisation experienced by the more populous regions of Ireland. Sligo is a microcosm of all that Ireland has to offer, cliffs, mountains, lakes, lush green fields and boglands, and despite its proximity to both Ballina and Sligo City, West Sligo is a collection of delightful communities and villages along the Atlantic coastline which have retained all their charm and authenticity throughout centuries of political turmoil and change, and recent economic growth.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Ballysadare Bay - 3.6 miles ESE
Sligo - 6 miles E
Rosses Point - 4.2 miles ENE
Brown Bay - 2.9 miles NE
Inishmurray - 6.2 miles NNE
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Killala Bay - 10.2 miles WSW
Kilcummin - 9.9 miles W
Belderg Harbour - 17.4 miles W
Porturlin Bay - 20.8 miles W
Portacloy Bay - 22.5 miles W




The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with area around Aughris.

The following video presents a photo montage of various scenes around Aughris and the bay.




A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.