England Ireland Find Havens
England Ireland Find Routes
Boat
Maintenance
Comfort
Operations
Safety
Other








Arklow is situated on Ireland’s east coast about midway between Dublin and the country’s southeasternmost corner Carnsore Point. It is an active provincial town and a commercial and fishing port. The port offers a small marina and ample fishing quays where a boat can come alongside and, in fine weather, it is possible to anchor outside.

Arklow is situated on Ireland’s east coast about midway between Dublin and the country’s southeasternmost corner Carnsore Point. It is an active provincial town and a commercial and fishing port. The port offers a small marina and ample fishing quays where a boat can come alongside and, in fine weather, it is possible to anchor outside.

Arklow’s inner harbour offers complete protection and is the very definition of a ‘hurricane hole’. A vessel could endure any weather condition unperturbed inside the basins of its Fish Harbour or marina. Access is straightforward as there are no immediate off-lying dangers and the entrance is deep and lit so it may be entered day or night on any state of the tide.
Please note

Access is easy in normal offshore winds but the opposite is the case with onshore winds from the northeast round to southeast. The most challenging of these is the north-easterly and it is well established that a stranger should not attempt entry in Force 6 from these quarters. Watch out for lobster pot markers as you come inshore.




2 comments
Keyfacts for Arklow



Last modified
May 20th 2019

Summary

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaMSD (marine sanitation device) pump out facilitiesHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaHandicapped access supported


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large city

Considerations
Note: fish farming activity in the vicinity of this location



 +353 87 2588078     HM  +353 402 32466      personnel@asl.ie      Ch.12, 16
Position and approaches
Expand to new tab or fullscreen

Haven position

52° 47.600' N, 006° 8.200' W

At the end of the South Pier at the harbour entrance beneath the light Fl WR 6s 10m 13M

What is the initial fix?

The following Arklow initial fix will set up a final approach:
52° 47.790' N, 006° 7.830' W
This waypoint is six hundred metres northeast of the entrance.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in eastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Dublin Bay to Rosslare Harbour Route location.

  • Vessels approaching from the east need to round the Arklow Bank situated about seven miles offshore. It is well marked and has a wind farm with conspicuous 106 metre high turbines at its centre.

  • The entrance channel is approached from the northeast. Sit off until it is possible to see down the length of its first 200 metres.

  • On final approaches the helmsman should make allowances for tidal streams that run across the mouth of the entrance.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Arklow for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Courtown Harbour - 5.9 miles SSW
  2. Wicklow Harbour - 7.4 miles NNE
  3. Cahore (Polduff) - 8.4 miles S
  4. Greystones - 13.4 miles N
  5. Bray Harbour - 15.5 miles N
  6. Sorrento Point - 17.7 miles N
  7. Dalkey Sound - 17.9 miles N
  8. Wexford Harbour - 18.4 miles SSW
  9. Dún Laoghaire Harbour - 18.8 miles N
  10. Rosslare Bay (or South Bay) - 20.1 miles SSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Courtown Harbour - 5.9 miles SSW
  2. Wicklow Harbour - 7.4 miles NNE
  3. Cahore (Polduff) - 8.4 miles S
  4. Greystones - 13.4 miles N
  5. Bray Harbour - 15.5 miles N
  6. Sorrento Point - 17.7 miles N
  7. Dalkey Sound - 17.9 miles N
  8. Wexford Harbour - 18.4 miles SSW
  9. Dún Laoghaire Harbour - 18.8 miles N
  10. Rosslare Bay (or South Bay) - 20.1 miles SSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



What's the story here?
Riverside pontoon
Image: Brian Lennon


Arklow is a provincial town with a small commercial and fishing port on the mouth of the Avoca River. Located about 1.2 miles north of Arklow Head, the harbour is entered between two parallel piers that lead into the river. Within the entrance are commercial quays and a fishing harbour basin, on the south side of the river, and a small marina further above on the northeast side of the river immediately before it abruptly shoals.

Berthing options include pontoon berths in the Fishing Harbour, depths of 2.8 metres, port side basin 600 metres within the entrance. It may also be possible to come alongside a fishing vessel here. Alternatively, the 60-berth Arklow Marina, 200 metres above, has depths of 2.8 metres. It is on the starboard side and though it is small and confined it has a river pontoon immediately above its entrance. In offshore winds vessels may anchor outside the harbour. This would become uncomfortable when the wind becomes south of southwest, or east of north.


The Fish Harbour basin with just Arklow Marina in the backdrop
Image: Michael Harpur


Arklow is easily entered in offshore winds or light onshore winds. This will most likely be the case as the prevailing winds here are south-westerly and heavy easterlies are unusual. Particularly so in the summer cruising season. If these are the conditions encountered, a heavy following wind from the northeast round to southeast will make an entry challenging. In these conditions, a vessel will be pitching into a lee shore and there is little margin for error.

The more the wind comes around to the southeast the more the pitching develops into a roll as the wind moves round onto the beam when the vessel aligns on the final entry path into the harbour. Because the south pier extends out 50 metres further than the north pier a vessel will not be thrown onto the north pier but it can be a challenging few moments.

Pontoon in the Fish Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


The more the heavy weather goes northeast, that is blowing directly into the harbour entrance, the more challenging it is. In a strong northeasterly the helmsman should continue to remain guarded after passing between the piers as 200 metres upriver the vessel has still to round hard to starboard with a following seaway. After this, the seaway immediately abates.


The small inner basin of Arklow Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


Vessels that draw 2.5 metres or more should also consider tides when entering during heavy offshore winds. The least depth in the entrance channel is 3.2 metres and it would be best advised to come in at half-tide or above to avoid striking the bottom on the trough of a wave.

A seasoned skipper will know the behaviour of their vessel in these circumstances. If it has however blown a steady northeasterly of Force 6 or more for the preceding six hours the unfamiliar would best be advised not to attempt Arklow’s entrance. Heavy conditions from the east and southeast are less dangerous but nonetheless challenging on entry.


How to get in?
Arklow
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use southeast Ireland's coastal overview Dublin Bay to Rosslare Harbour Route location for seaward approaches. Arklow Head, a mile south of the entrance to the harbour, will be conspicuous from seaward. It is located 2.2 miles north of Kilmichael Point. Arklow Rock, a conspicuous 123 metres high hill, rises close southwest of the head. The hill is being reduced by quarrying and a private Roadstone Jetty, situated 400 metres north of Arklow Head, is used to transport the stone.

Arklow as seen from the northeast with Arklow Head in the backdrop
Image: Michael Harpur


The Roadstone Jetty extends 250 metres from the shore and is protected by a breakwater which extends out much further and is often unlit. This jetty should not be approached or used by leisure craft and vessels approaching at night should make a note not to confuse the jetty lights for those of the harbour entrance.

Roadstone Jetty – position: 52° 46.800’N, 006° 08.840’W

Vessels approaching Arklow should maintain a constant watch for fishermen's pots. They are usually indicated by coloured jerry cans and should be expected approximately 3 miles to the north and 1 mile to the south of the harbour.


A white factory stands prominent on the shore close northwest of the north pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Initial fix location Well before the initial fix Arklow will have already been made obvious by a 25-metre high white factory with a 44-metre high chimney on the shore close northwest of the north pier. At night a light Fl WR 6s 10m 13M is shown from a framework tower on the south pierhead and LFl.G.7s 7m 10M on the North Pier. If these are not seen it is most likely due to a maintenance issue.

The framework tower on the head of the south pierhead
Image: Michael Harpur


The harbour’s entrance channel is 55-metre wide and northeast facing. Before a final approach is made in any challenging conditions, sit off until it is possible to see right down the first 200 metres of the harbour’s entrance channel. This is as far as the first bend where the river curves to the right or northwest.

Yacht exiting Arklow Harbour's entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


Once the alignment is assured come straight in mid-channel closely monitoring and giving due allowance to the tidal stream that runs across the mouth of the entrance.
Please note

Be particularly watchful on an ebb tide that sets south-eastward across the harbour entrance. This pushes an approaching vessel towards the South Wall. The rising north-westbound bound current is less of an issue as the North Wall is stepped back.




The first bend after which are the approaches to the docks and basins
Image: Michael Harpur


Immediately within the entrance favour the north side as there are three Groynes extending perpendicularly from the South Pier. These breakwaters protect the harbour from heavy north-easterly conditions. At night the heads of these breakwaters are marked by a beacon Fl R. Once in and around the first bend and approaching the dock area it immediately becomes well sheltered. There is a 3-knot harbour speed limit and you can elect to go to the Fish Harbour basin or the marina.


Arklow's Fish Harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location The first berthing opportunities are in Fish Harbour. This is a basin on the south side of the river about 600 metres in from of the harbour mouth. It has a new pontoon here supporting 20 berths with depths of 2.8. On the seaward quay of the basin a yacht may lie alongside a fishing boat, many of which are scarcely used or laid-up, but keep clear of the pilot launch.


Yacht approaching pontoon inside the fish harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Within the basin, it is all soft mud and generally has up to 2.8 metres but the southern side dries. The entrance is 14 metres wide and has at least a depth of 1.7 metres. Approach the entrance mid-river and swing hard to come in through the entrance.


The turning basin and Arklow Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


Beyond the Fish Harbour and close south of the marina is a turning basin. It is 122 metres long and 107 metres wide and situated a ⅓ of a mile above the entrance. Before this, the river shallows abruptly from the southwest side and a sandbank has emerged with a danger mark just before the local small boat moorings. This danger mark is, as often as not, laying on its side in the dry and indistinguishable so keep a sharp eye out. The marina and pontoon are therefore best approached between the middle of the river and the northern bank.


The river pontoon immediately north of the marina entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


The entrance to Arklow Marina is to starboard about 100 metres further upriver from the Fish Harbour entrance, immediately at the west end of the commercial North Quay. It is made conspicuous by a tall red mast light immediately upriver of the Marina entrance. A pontoon is situated upriver of the marina entrance on the north quay which has 30 berths.


The entrance to Arklow Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


The small inner harbour has 42 berths set into a small basin that is constrained and has little turning space. It has limited capacity and can only cater for medium-sized boats of 10-12 metres or less. Larger vessels are best advised to berth alongside the 100 metres long pontoon on the north bank. Do not proceed beyond the end of the pontoon as depths quickly shoal towards the bridge.


Arklow Marina's small inner harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


Those planning to anchor off should avoid anchoring 400 metres north of the entrance where a submarine pipeline extends due east for about half a mile from the coast. Beyond this, there is an area of spoil ground.


Why visit here?
Arklow, in Irish 'An tInbhear Mór' meaning 'the broad estuary', was founded by the Vikings. Its name is derived from the conjunction of the Old Norse words Arnkell-lág. These mean 'Arknell's Low' or 'meadow of Arnkell' with Arknell being a Viking chieftain and ‘low’ or ‘meadow’ being his claimed bounty of taken land.

The Vikings settled here in the ninth century making it one of the earliest of the raiders Irish towns. Their original settlement was on the low-lying floodplain on the north side of Arklow, an area that is now known as Arklow Town Marsh. The Norse influence dominated for more than two centuries until the Normans arrived.

Lead by Theobald Walter the Normans quickly took control of the town building Ormonde Castle on the site of the overwhelmed Viking fortification; the remains of which are located on Parade Ground today. The Anglo-Norman King Henry II, king of England, granted Theobald Fitzwalter the town of Arklow along with a large amount of the hinterland in 1185. It remained in the hands of his family, the Butlers, throughout medieval times. In 1264 the Dominicans were granted a large tract of land that is now known as Abbeylands. On this, they built an Abbey that became known as the Priory of the True Cross or Holy Cross.

During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms in September 1649, Oliver Cromwell and his army arrived at Arklow on route to take Wexford. After an initial contact that destroyed the well-aged Ormonde Castle, he accepted the surrender of the town sparing it the carnage that was to occur in Wexford. Arklow, however, would not escape so lightly 150 years later when it was to be the site of one of the bloodiest and pivotal battles of the 1798 United Irishmen rebellion.

The battle took place on the 9th of June when a force of United Irishmen from Wexford, estimated to be made up of 10,000 small farm hands, launched an assault on the town. Arklow stood between Wexford, the seat of rebellion, and its spread into Wicklow and onward onto the streets of the capital Dublin. The advance was anticipated and a force of 1,700 men was hastily sent from Dublin to heavily fortify the town with barricades and artillery placements on all the approaches.

With little or no arms, training or leadership, the rebels led by a priest Fr. Michael Murphy were no match for the British forces, who prevailed. The rebel casualties, including Fr. Michael Murphy, were estimated to be about 1,000. No casualties were recorded on the British side, but it is thought to be in the region of 100 dead and wounded. The defeat at Arklow, following two previous bloody repulses at New Ross and Bunclody, enclosed the rebellion within the borders of County Wexford. With its advance halted, the revolt retrenched and was gradually subdued by encroaching British armies.

Founded by sea raiders on a river estuary Arklow always retained a strong maritime tradition through its trials and tribulations. The Avoca River played a vital role in this by providing a transport conduit for the import and export of minerals to service the upstream mining activities. The port itself focused on fishing, but improvements in the late 19th century enabled an extensive fleet to service the trade from the Avoca mines that exported quarried stone from Arklow Rock, and chemicals for the Arklow Manure Company, and Kynoch’s munitions factory. The town at one time had the largest fishing fleet based in the Irish Sea and a thriving shipbuilding industry.

Notable vessels from its livery include the national sail training vessel Asgard II, and Gypsy Moth III the yacht that Sir Francis Chichester raced solo across the Atlantic in 1960, and which was considered a better vessel than his circumnavigating Gypsy Moth IV. This maritime tradition provided the main source of employment and influenced the location of houses, the development of local schools, shops and services.

Recent times have seen large reductions in cargo and fishing and the shipyards have closed. However the presence of the port and associated maritime heritage contributes greatly to the character of the town. It retains its national shipping significance by being the headquarters of Arklow Shipping that maintains 37 cargo ships which is the largest fleet in Ireland.

Today Arklow is a thriving commuter town with many residents travelling daily to work in Dublin. With a population of 13,009, as reported in the 2011 census, it is the third largest town in the county. The old Viking area of Arklow Town Marsh is a proposed Natural Heritage Area of ecological importance and artefacts from its Viking period are on display in Dublin’s National Museum of Ireland. The Abbey was destroyed in 1796 but the site is currently maintained as Abbeylands Park which is the location of the historic town, castle, church and graveyard. Two memorials commemorate the 1798 battle, one on Parade Ground and one on Coolgreany Road. Arklow’s maritime heritage is well remembered in its Maritime Museum, located at the Bridgewater Shopping Centre.

From a boating point of view, Arklow is an excellent place to wait out foul weather, provision up and attend to repairs in perfect security from all weather conditions. The safe berth it offers also makes it an ideal location to visit many local beauty spots of County Wicklow including Glenmalure, Glendalough and Avoca.


What facilities are available?
Diesel fuel is available from the fisherman’s dock, and water and electricity are available at the marina plus shower and toilet facilities. The pontoon at the Fisherman's Harbour has no toilets, showers or WiFi. It has water and power but no hoses. The town has a boatyard, a chandlery close to the river opposite the marina, and engineers but no sailmaker. Bottled gas is available locally in the town, along with all the shops, pubs and restaurants you would expect from a large provincial town, all within walking distance of the marina & dock. There are two superstores almost overlooking the marina.

Arklow has excellent transport links. Rail connections are provided by Iarnród Éireann along the Dublin-Rosslare railway line, including commuter and intercity services in and out of the capital. Bus Éireann provides several routes through Arklow, including the 002, 006, 133 and 384 services. Wexford Bus also operates several services day and night linking Arklow with Dublin Airport. It is also adjacent to the N11/M11 Dublin to Rosslare motorway.


Any security concerns?
There are no specific issues in Arklow, but as with any small provincial town lock up as you would do normally when the vessel is unattended.


With thanks to:
Paul Barrett, local boatman of many years and Brian Lennon. Photography with thanks to Michael Harpur, Brian Lennon, 私の写真, Karhallarn and David Quinn.


Expand to new tab or fullscreen
Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.



























Arklow Aerial Overview


About Arklow

Arklow, in Irish 'An tInbhear Mór' meaning 'the broad estuary', was founded by the Vikings. Its name is derived from the conjunction of the Old Norse words Arnkell-lág. These mean 'Arknell's Low' or 'meadow of Arnkell' with Arknell being a Viking chieftain and ‘low’ or ‘meadow’ being his claimed bounty of taken land.

The Vikings settled here in the ninth century making it one of the earliest of the raiders Irish towns. Their original settlement was on the low-lying floodplain on the north side of Arklow, an area that is now known as Arklow Town Marsh. The Norse influence dominated for more than two centuries until the Normans arrived.

Lead by Theobald Walter the Normans quickly took control of the town building Ormonde Castle on the site of the overwhelmed Viking fortification; the remains of which are located on Parade Ground today. The Anglo-Norman King Henry II, king of England, granted Theobald Fitzwalter the town of Arklow along with a large amount of the hinterland in 1185. It remained in the hands of his family, the Butlers, throughout medieval times. In 1264 the Dominicans were granted a large tract of land that is now known as Abbeylands. On this, they built an Abbey that became known as the Priory of the True Cross or Holy Cross.

During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms in September 1649, Oliver Cromwell and his army arrived at Arklow on route to take Wexford. After an initial contact that destroyed the well-aged Ormonde Castle, he accepted the surrender of the town sparing it the carnage that was to occur in Wexford. Arklow, however, would not escape so lightly 150 years later when it was to be the site of one of the bloodiest and pivotal battles of the 1798 United Irishmen rebellion.

The battle took place on the 9th of June when a force of United Irishmen from Wexford, estimated to be made up of 10,000 small farm hands, launched an assault on the town. Arklow stood between Wexford, the seat of rebellion, and its spread into Wicklow and onward onto the streets of the capital Dublin. The advance was anticipated and a force of 1,700 men was hastily sent from Dublin to heavily fortify the town with barricades and artillery placements on all the approaches.

With little or no arms, training or leadership, the rebels led by a priest Fr. Michael Murphy were no match for the British forces, who prevailed. The rebel casualties, including Fr. Michael Murphy, were estimated to be about 1,000. No casualties were recorded on the British side, but it is thought to be in the region of 100 dead and wounded. The defeat at Arklow, following two previous bloody repulses at New Ross and Bunclody, enclosed the rebellion within the borders of County Wexford. With its advance halted, the revolt retrenched and was gradually subdued by encroaching British armies.

Founded by sea raiders on a river estuary Arklow always retained a strong maritime tradition through its trials and tribulations. The Avoca River played a vital role in this by providing a transport conduit for the import and export of minerals to service the upstream mining activities. The port itself focused on fishing, but improvements in the late 19th century enabled an extensive fleet to service the trade from the Avoca mines that exported quarried stone from Arklow Rock, and chemicals for the Arklow Manure Company, and Kynoch’s munitions factory. The town at one time had the largest fishing fleet based in the Irish Sea and a thriving shipbuilding industry.

Notable vessels from its livery include the national sail training vessel Asgard II, and Gypsy Moth III the yacht that Sir Francis Chichester raced solo across the Atlantic in 1960, and which was considered a better vessel than his circumnavigating Gypsy Moth IV. This maritime tradition provided the main source of employment and influenced the location of houses, the development of local schools, shops and services.

Recent times have seen large reductions in cargo and fishing and the shipyards have closed. However the presence of the port and associated maritime heritage contributes greatly to the character of the town. It retains its national shipping significance by being the headquarters of Arklow Shipping that maintains 37 cargo ships which is the largest fleet in Ireland.

Today Arklow is a thriving commuter town with many residents travelling daily to work in Dublin. With a population of 13,009, as reported in the 2011 census, it is the third largest town in the county. The old Viking area of Arklow Town Marsh is a proposed Natural Heritage Area of ecological importance and artefacts from its Viking period are on display in Dublin’s National Museum of Ireland. The Abbey was destroyed in 1796 but the site is currently maintained as Abbeylands Park which is the location of the historic town, castle, church and graveyard. Two memorials commemorate the 1798 battle, one on Parade Ground and one on Coolgreany Road. Arklow’s maritime heritage is well remembered in its Maritime Museum, located at the Bridgewater Shopping Centre.

From a boating point of view, Arklow is an excellent place to wait out foul weather, provision up and attend to repairs in perfect security from all weather conditions. The safe berth it offers also makes it an ideal location to visit many local beauty spots of County Wicklow including Glenmalure, Glendalough and Avoca.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Courtown Harbour - 5.9 miles SSW
Cahore (Polduff) - 8.4 miles S
Wexford Harbour - 18.4 miles SSW
Rosslare Bay (or South Bay) - 20.1 miles SSW
Rosslare Europort (Rosslare Harbour) - 20.5 miles SSW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Wicklow Harbour - 7.4 miles NNE
Greystones - 13.4 miles N
Bray Harbour - 15.5 miles N
Sorrento Point - 17.7 miles N
Dalkey Sound - 17.9 miles N

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Arklow.






































Arklow Aerial Overview



A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


Add your review or comment:


Colin Ingram wrote this review on May 27th 2010:

We visited this harbour on 21st May, mooring on the long visitor's pontoon. When we departed, we went over a patch equivalent to 1.0m at CD just opposite the moored Lightship and about 15m from it. We expected it because we watched one of the local race yachts go aground on it when he went out at LW the previous day. Keeping close by the Lightship would avoid this patch. Also, as shown in your photos, there is a powerboat frequently moored on the port side of the marina entrance, which makes entering the marina rather sporting for beamy craft ... The Arklow marina folk and locals were very friendly and helpfull !!

Average Rating: Unrated


Robin Anderson wrote this review on Dec 5th 2013:

Took shelter in Arklow from September gale in 2013. Easy to enter - shallow not far off the marina entrance so keep close to starboard on final approach to marina. Moored on the pontoon just outside the marina which was very full with local boats and is very tight for turning space. The harbour area is sadly very run down but the showers etc are good and there is a large new modern shopping mall a short walk away. The town is on the other side of the bridge and is good for provisions. Good marina staff and helpful Harbour Master.

Average Rating: Unrated

Please log in to leave a review of this haven.



Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.