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Rossaveal

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Overview





Rossaveal, or Rossaveel, is tucked into the east corner of Cashla Bay on the northern shore of Galway Bay about twenty miles west of Galway Docks. It is a fishing harbour and village that offers a small marina which welcomes visitors. Alternatively, it may be possible to lie alongside a friendly fishing boat, for a short stay, or anchor just off the harbour approaches in the lower end of the bay during a settled period.

Nestled deep in the north end of a bay the harbour affords complete shelter. Safe access is possible in all reasonable conditions, at all stages of the tide and night or day via a well-marked and dredged approach channel.
Please note

The harbour is normally very busy and noisy with ferries to the Aran Islands, and it is recommended that you call the marina in advance to reserve a berth.




2 comments
Keyfacts for Rossaveal
Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsideShop with basic provisions availableFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3.7 metres (12.14 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
October 16th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water available via tapDiesel fuel available alongsideShop with basic provisions availableFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaBus service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 16.060' N, 009° 33.622' W

This is the position of the No.2 pierhead.

What is the initial fix?

The following Rossaveal Initial Fix will set up a final approach:
53° 12.916' N, 009° 34.812' W
This is on the 30 metre contour and in the white sector light of the directional light situated on Lion Point a white square concrete tower on a column, 4 metres in height, which leads into Cashla Bay.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location.

  • Steer a course of 10° towards Lion Point indicated by a directional light situated there to pass
    between Killeen Point and Cannon Rock Starboard Buoy, Fl.G.5s. Cannon Rock.

  • Follow the buoys into the inner bay passing the contraction to less than 400 metres between Curraglass Point on the west and Lion Point and proceed northward.

  • Turn south-eastward into the entrance channel, which is marked Rossaveel Pier's leading lights in line 116°T, to pass in through the inner beacons to the quaysides.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Rossaveal for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Sruthan Quay - 0.5 miles WNW
  2. Greatman's Bay - 2.1 miles WNW
  3. Kiggaul Bay - 3.6 miles WSW
  4. Dinish & Furness Islands - 4.2 miles W
  5. Kilkieran Bay - 4.3 miles WNW
  6. Spiddle - 5.8 miles E
  7. Kilronan - 6.1 miles SSW
  8. Inishmaan - 6.2 miles S
  9. Inisheer - 7.5 miles S
  10. Fanore Bay - 8 miles SE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Sruthan Quay - 0.5 miles WNW
  2. Greatman's Bay - 2.1 miles WNW
  3. Kiggaul Bay - 3.6 miles WSW
  4. Dinish & Furness Islands - 4.2 miles W
  5. Kilkieran Bay - 4.3 miles WNW
  6. Spiddle - 5.8 miles E
  7. Kilronan - 6.1 miles SSW
  8. Inishmaan - 6.2 miles S
  9. Inisheer - 7.5 miles S
  10. Fanore Bay - 8 miles SE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
Rossaveel Harbour on the northeastern shore of upper Cashla Bay
Image: © Eoin Faherty


Rossaveel, Ros An Mhíl Harbour is located on the north side of the North Sound approach to Galway Bay. It is located seven miles to the east of Golam Head and nineteen miles from Galway Docks and on the northeastern shore of upper Cashla Bay. It is a Gaeltacht village fishing harbour and the main ferry port for the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

The fishing piers support depths from 3.7 to 5.8 CD and can take vessels of up to 4 metres LOA. The harbour has a marina with three visitor berths, 13, 14 and 15 metres long, that carry a draft of 2.0 metres CD. A fourth visitor berth is 16 metres long with 3.7 metres CD. The least depth in the approach channel is 3.7 metres C.D. It is also possible to anchor west of a Martello Tower in the outer part of the bay just off the approaches or come alongside an accommodating fishing boat.

It is always best to contact the harbour master in advance, VHF Ch 16 and all working channels when manned, P: + 353 (0) 91 560506/7, E: johnc.donnelly@agriculture.gov.ie to confirm availability.

Rossaveel Marina
Image: Ian Capper via CC BY-SA 2.0


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location. The bay, about 2 miles east of Greatman’s Bay, is entered between Killeen Point and Cashla Point about 1.2 miles east. Cashla Bay extends for about 3 miles northward and is easy to access. At the visible head of the bay two small but remarkable features will be seen; Round Hill on the left, and Mount Ballagh on the right, backed by the superb chain of mountains called the Twelve Pins, or Benna Beola, that stretch between Lough Corrib and the Killary Bays.

At night look for a sectored light on a white column on a concrete structure on Aillecluggish Point, close northeast of Killeen Point on the west side of the entrance, visible 216°-W-000°-R-069°, which shows red over Carrickmarian and Narien Spit, dangers that lie ½ a mile south of from Killeen Point on the western side of the approach channel.

Cashla Bay - West of entrance Fl (3) WR 10s 8m W6M, R3M position: 53° 14.230’N, 009° 35.180’W


Initial fix location From the initial fix steer a course of 10° towards Lion Point, where the directional light is situated.
The light, a white square concrete tower on a column, 4 metres in height, indicates an entry path into Cashla Bay to the west of Cannon Rock and to proceed up to the pass between Lion and Curraglass Points - G005°-008.5° (3.5°), W008.5°-011.5° (3°), R011.5°-015° (3.5°).

Following this lead then passes between Killeen Point and Cannon Rock Starboard Buoy, Fl.G.5s. Cannon Rock, that dries to 1.7 metres and has a perch, is fringed by foul ground and lies in the centre of the outer approach and is marked by a starboard hand buoy. Once past Carrickadda, ½ mile north by northeast of Cannon Rock, take a central course up the narrowing bay.

Tóin an Chnoic overlooking the lower bay
Image: © Eoin Faherty


This leads into the outer anchorage west of Tóin an Chnoic (Tonacrick) Martello Tower that stands on the eastern shore under Rossaveel Hill. Above it, the bay, which is a mile wide at the entrance, contracts to less than 400 metres between Curraglass Point on the west and Lion Point on the east, where it again expands and turns to the east.

The inner part of Cashla Bay is approached by a north track passing through the narrows marked by
the Ship Rock, FL R 3s, port light buoy and a starboard hand light buoy, FL G 3s, at Lion Point. Once through the narrows, there is excellent shelter and the track then leads north past the Struthan, QR, port hand light buoy and then to a starboard hand light buoy, QG.

Lion Point Starboard Buoy
Image: Ian Capper via CC BY-SA 2.0


This marks the turning point into the entrance channel, which is marked by Rossaveel Pier's leading lights in line 116° T. The front, a white mast Oc 3s 7m 3M and the rear, 90m from the front, Oc 3s 8m 3M.

Rossaveel Pier - Front light Oc 3s 7m 3M position: 53°16.023’N, 009°33.393’W

The harbour is then entered through inner beacons to the quaysides. The ferries use pontoon berths in the southeast basin and fishing boats use Piers No. 1 & 2 to the southwest.


Rossaveel Harbour
Image: © Eoin Faherty


Haven location The Marina is directly to the north of the ferry berth facilities and provides for approximately 40 pleasure craft of various sizes.

Rossaveel Marina
Image: Peter Craven


It may be possible to come alongside an accommodating fishing boat temporarily in the harbour or, as aforementioned, anchor off the Martello Tower, with excellent stiff mud and shell holding ground. The anchorage is exposed to southerly winds.


Why visit here?
Rossaveal, in Irish Ros an Mihl which means peninsula of the whale or sea monster, is a small Gaeltacht (Irish speaking) village on the south coast of the Connemara district of County Galway.

Situated in the west of Ireland, the Connemara region is a large peninsula bounded on the north, west and south by the Atlantic Ocean. Rossaveal and Cashla Bay are part of the south district of Connemara, a region that is highly popular with tourists coming from within the country as well as foreigners, some using the nearby city of Galway with its many amenities as their base. Although it is one of the most popular regions of Ireland for tourism, the weather in Connemara could disappoint many visitors, sometimes very mild and humid, but because of the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually rather wet and windy especially in winter when storms happen frequently. The region is almost constantly battered by westerly winds, witness the bent trees in areas most often hit by the strong winds, but you must take the time to appreciate the beauty and wildness of the region's landscape.

The south Connemara coast and its many islands, with the stunning backdrop of Knockmorden, the Maumturks, and The Bens – the Twelve Pins of Connemara are a wonderful place to spend exploring. Amongst the granite landscape of Cashla Bay, Greatman's Bay, Kilkieran Bay and Bertraghboy Bay the coast is studded with rocks and islands, and the intricate passages amongst them make for fascinating day-sailing. Seven causeways or bridges link islands to each other and to the mainland.

Rossaveal is a small harbour village where regular ferries leave for the Aran Islands which are visible from the south Connemara coastline. The Islands are a day trip or more, but it's a trip well worth making to explore Iron Age forts, see the traditional Aran hand-knitted sweaters, and watch craftsmen build currachs the traditional fishing boats used by the Islanders.

Rossaveal is in the heart of the Connemara Gaeltacht, an area where Irish is still the first language, and where generations of Irish schoolchildren have come for a week or two during their summer break to learn the language. It is also vaguely the area where a popular Irish language TV soap opera Ros na Run is set. For the visiting sailor, Rossaveal has a grocery shop for the restocking of provisions, fuel, water and electricity and toilets are available, and a pub and restaurant are a short distance from the quay.

One of the main attractions for berthing in Rossaveal is its close proximity to Galway city. Being only 20 miles away and served by local buses, it is easily reached for shopping expeditions or for exploring its culture without having to sail all the way in. Furthermore with Galway Airport at Carnmore only 4 miles north of the city Rossaveal makes a convenient location for a crew change. If a quicker journey than by ferry to the Aran Islands is required, Connemara Regional Airport at Inverin, 5 miles south of Rossaveal, has daily flights.

Cashla Bay is one of the most sheltered anchorages on this part of the coast with easy access in most conditions and it has the added advantage of being lit with two fixed lights and a number of lit and unlit buoys making a day or night entry possible.

It should be noted however that Cashla Bay contains the port for the ferries to the Aran islands and with tourist activity plus many fishing vessels it is normally very busy and noisy. If seclusion and scenery are sought after, the neighbouring Greatman's Bay may be preferred although it lacks facilities.


What facilities are available?
Water and shore power on the pontoons, freshwater and fuel on the quays, toilets on shore. A slipway and some marine engineering services are available. There is a grocery shop 0.5 mile from the quay and a pub and restaurant about a mile away.

There is a bus service, route 24, that connects Rossaveal with Galway city, and Galway city airport at Carnmore is just 24 miles away. There is also the Connemara regional airport (a.k.a. Minna airport) 5 miles to the south of Rossaveal at Inverin.


With thanks to:
eOceanic & Peter Craven


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Bird's Eye View Of Rossavea



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Add your review or comment:


Paul Harrison wrote this review on Sep 14th 2015:

€20 a night for marina in 2015. Toilets and Shower ashore at no extra charge. simple, but good hot water and no time limit. Slip available.

Average Rating: ****


PETER CRAVEN wrote this review on Sep 19th 2018:

There is now a brand new marina with 100+ on the north side of the existing marina. (Not yet on the Google Earth satellite image (19/09/18). Power and water are available at each berth. Cost per night for 8m was €16.00. Harbour Master's mobile - John Donnelly - is 087 235 9735. Marina supervisor is Padraig 086 418 1342.
Fuel can be got from Gearoid Walsh 087 252 5088 who will deliver in his tanker for an extra €10. He is also a mine of local sailing information.


Average Rating: Unrated

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