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Sruthan Quay

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Overview





Sruthan Quay is located on the west side of Cashla Bay on the northern shore of Galway Bay, about twenty miles west of Galway Docks. It offers a drying quay in a remote setting with good anchorage off its head and visitor moorings.

Sruthan Quay is located on the west side of Cashla Bay on the northern shore of Galway Bay, about twenty miles west of Galway Docks. It offers a drying quay in a remote setting with good anchorage off its head and visitor moorings.

The anchorage affords good shelter and protection in most conditions though sometimes it can be subject to swell and best avoided in developed southerly conditions. Safe access is possible in all reasonable conditions, at all stages of the tide, night or day via a well-marked and dredged approach channel.



1 comment
Keyfacts for Sruthan Quay
Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaPost Office in the areaBus service available in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementNavigation lights to support a night approachSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pier

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
September 2nd 2021

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with safe access.

Facilities
Water available via tapTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaPost Office in the areaBus service available in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementNavigation lights to support a night approachSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pier



Position and approaches
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Haven position

53° 16.258' N, 009° 34.833' W

this is the position at the head of the quay.

What is the initial fix?

The following Rossaveal initial fix will set up a final approach:
53° 11.515' N, 009° 46.722' W
This is the position in the North Sound of Galway Bay midway between Inishmore (Aran Islands) to the south, and Golam Head (Lettermullen Island) off the mainland to the north.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location for seaward approaches and the Rossaveel Harbour Click to view haven provides directions for local approaches. Do not cut in from the narrows and only turn for the quay when opposite the Rossaveel turn-buoy.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Sruthan Quay for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Rossaveel - 0.5 miles ESE
  2. Greatman's Bay - 1.6 miles WNW
  3. Kiggaul Bay - 3.2 miles WSW
  4. Dinish & Furness Islands - 3.8 miles W
  5. Kilkieran Bay - 3.9 miles WNW
  6. Kilronan - 6.1 miles SSW
  7. Spiddle - 6.2 miles E
  8. Inishmaan - 6.3 miles S
  9. Inisheer - 7.7 miles S
  10. Bertraghboy Bay - 7.7 miles NW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Rossaveel - 0.5 miles ESE
  2. Greatman's Bay - 1.6 miles WNW
  3. Kiggaul Bay - 3.2 miles WSW
  4. Dinish & Furness Islands - 3.8 miles W
  5. Kilkieran Bay - 3.9 miles WNW
  6. Kilronan - 6.1 miles SSW
  7. Spiddle - 6.2 miles E
  8. Inishmaan - 6.3 miles S
  9. Inisheer - 7.7 miles S
  10. Bertraghboy Bay - 7.7 miles NW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Sruthan Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Sruthan Quay is located on the northwestern shore and near the head of Cashla Bay which opens to the north side of the North Sound approach into Galway Bay. It is a drying quay with a large slipway at its head. The quay dries to its head and there are visitors’ moorings off the quay as well as a good anchorage. It is used by small and moderately sized open fishing boats, leisure craft and local Galway Hookers, a distinctive form of native Irish sailboat.


Sruthan Quay at low water
Image: Michael Harpur


Sruthan Quay has good shelter and protection in most conditions. The narrows between Curraglass Point and Lion Point provides the upper part of Cashla Bay with good protection. It can sometimes be subject to swell, even in calm weather, and is untenable in south or southeasterly gales. During these times it is simply a matter of crossing over to Rossaveel.


The view into Cashla Bay from the slipway
Image: Michael Harpur


There are 8 visitors’ moorings are available off the quay, yellow buoys moored in 3 metres LAT and rated to 15 tonnes. Many of the visitors moorings will here have local boats on them. If occupied there is a good anchorage about 100 metres off the quay in about 2.5 metres depth.


How to get in?
Sruthan Quay on the northwest side if Cashla Bay
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Mizen Head to Loop Head Route location for seaward approaches and the Rossaveel Harbour Click to view haven provides directions for local approaches.

Do not be tempted to cut directly in for Sruthan Quay from the head of the narrows between Curraglass Point and Lion Point. There are two awash pinnacle rocks, marked by the port Sruthan Buoy, in this path. These lay at the outer end of a spit that also extends from the western shore with a number of unmarked below water rocks.

The safest approach to avoid all of these is not to turn for the quay until abreast of the last starboard buoy marking the turn-point for the approach to Rossaveel. At the top half of the tide, with a sufficient rise, a shallow draught craft may however pass over the below water rocks lying between the outer pinnacle rocks and the western shore.

Sruthan Quay as seen from the southeast
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Pick up a visitor mooring or anchor according to draught 100 to 200 metres off the quay at Sruthan.


Vessels moored off of Sruthan Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


There is also the opportunity to temporarily come alongside the quay although it dries at low water. Vessels that can take to the bottom can dry out where space is available. If coming alongside keep an eye out for small stone pillars that can be left in the water as a support for the outer bilge of a hooker when work is being undertaken on a boat here.


Why visit here?
Sruthán Quay, in Irish Céibh a Srutháin, takes its name from its stream. 'Sruthán' is a common term for a 'stream' with a streamlet, often called 'sruffane'. The sound of 'th' is often changed to that of 'f' in the Galway area, converting its sound to 'sruffan' or 'sruffaun' in common use.


Sruthan Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Cashla Bay is covered in the Rossaveel Harbour entry. What Sruthán Quay offers is the potential to moor up close to the bay's classic working boats, the Galway Hookers. The quay is an important centre for this type of boat. Obvious jokes aside, Galway Hookers, Irish 'húiceár', are Galway’s traditional wooden sailing boats, that featured on the city’s coat of arms. In their day they were known as 'pucans' and 'gleotogs' and the term 'hookers' was an English description.


A Galway Hooker under full sail
Image: Andreas Riemenschneider via CC BY-ND 2.0


The iconic vessel has a broad jet-black hull, due to the pitch used for waterproofing, while the sails flying from a single thick mast are typically a distinctive rust colour. Small, tough and highly manoeuvrable, these wooden boats were the basis of local seafaring during the 19th-century and they continued to be used into the 20th-century. During this period the Galway Hooker was the primary method of transport between the Aran Islands and the mainland. They were also used along the Atlantic coast to ferry peat, cattle and beer. Nowadays they are mainly heritage vessels built and maintained by enthusiasts who keep them in a beautiful state of repair. The vessels are raced in numerous regattas along the Connemara coast and present a glorious sight when under sail.


Galway Hookers racing
Image: Andreas Riemenschneider via CC BY-ND 2.0


From a boating perspective, Sruthan Quay had all the advantages of Cashla Bay, one of the most sheltered anchorages on this part of the coast with easy access in reasonable conditions. However, being in a completely out of the way location it does not have the busy fishing boats and high-speed ferry traffic associated with Rossaveel across the water.


What facilities are available?
There are limited facilities at Sruthan Quay but freshwater is available, with a petrol station and a shop close by. At nearby Carraroe (1-mile southwest) and Costelloe (1.5 miles east), there are further grocery shops, post offices, and pubs and hotels. Rossaveel, opposite, Fresh Water, Diesel, Marine Engineering.

A local bus service connects Carraroe to Galway city approx. 25 miles away.


Any security concerns?
Neve an issue know to occur at Sruthan Quay.


With thanks to:
With thanks to Padraic O'Toole, Rossaveel Marina.







A Galway Hooker called 'American Mor', the Big American.


About Sruthan Quay

Sruthán Quay, in Irish Céibh a Srutháin, takes its name from its stream. 'Sruthán' is a common term for a 'stream' with a streamlet, often called 'sruffane'. The sound of 'th' is often changed to that of 'f' in the Galway area, converting its sound to 'sruffan' or 'sruffaun' in common use.


Sruthan Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Cashla Bay is covered in the Rossaveel Harbour entry. What Sruthán Quay offers is the potential to moor up close to the bay's classic working boats, the Galway Hookers. The quay is an important centre for this type of boat. Obvious jokes aside, Galway Hookers, Irish 'húiceár', are Galway’s traditional wooden sailing boats, that featured on the city’s coat of arms. In their day they were known as 'pucans' and 'gleotogs' and the term 'hookers' was an English description.


A Galway Hooker under full sail
Image: Andreas Riemenschneider via CC BY-ND 2.0


The iconic vessel has a broad jet-black hull, due to the pitch used for waterproofing, while the sails flying from a single thick mast are typically a distinctive rust colour. Small, tough and highly manoeuvrable, these wooden boats were the basis of local seafaring during the 19th-century and they continued to be used into the 20th-century. During this period the Galway Hooker was the primary method of transport between the Aran Islands and the mainland. They were also used along the Atlantic coast to ferry peat, cattle and beer. Nowadays they are mainly heritage vessels built and maintained by enthusiasts who keep them in a beautiful state of repair. The vessels are raced in numerous regattas along the Connemara coast and present a glorious sight when under sail.


Galway Hookers racing
Image: Andreas Riemenschneider via CC BY-ND 2.0


From a boating perspective, Sruthan Quay had all the advantages of Cashla Bay, one of the most sheltered anchorages on this part of the coast with easy access in reasonable conditions. However, being in a completely out of the way location it does not have the busy fishing boats and high-speed ferry traffic associated with Rossaveel across the water.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Greatman's Bay - 1.6 miles WNW
Kiggaul Bay - 3.2 miles WSW
Dinish & Furness Islands - 3.8 miles W
Kilkieran Bay - 3.9 miles WNW
Bertraghboy Bay - 7.7 miles NW
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Rossaveel - 0.5 miles ESE
Spiddle - 6.2 miles E
Galway Docks - 11.9 miles E
South Bay & Rincarna Bay - 13.9 miles E
Kinvara Bay - 14.2 miles ESE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Sruthan Quay.
























A Galway Hooker called 'American Mor', the Big American.



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Add your review or comment:


PETER CRAVEN wrote this review on Sep 19th 2018:

This haven is a stone's throw from Rossaveal marina but is of course free. There are visitor moorings available. While sheltered and apparently well inland the haven can become a bit rocky from the swell coming up from the south

Average Rating: **

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