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Dublin



Listed locations follow the Dublin coastline in a clockwise direction. Their positions may be seen on a satellite image at the bottom of this page. Alternatively, if you're looking for shelter, facilities or a type of location within this county, try our find resources tool.

Balbriggan Harbour
A good location with straightforward access. 0 metres LWS. Balbriggan Harbour is a small fishing port on the east coast of Ireland, situated on the north County Dublin coastline, about three miles northwest of Skerries and six miles south of the River Boyne. It offers a small artificial harbour that dries out well beyond its head. It is only suitable for vessels that are prepared to work the tides and take to bottom in the harbour. get full information »

Skerries Bay and Harbour
A tolerable location with straightforward access. 4 metres LWS. Skerries Bay and Harbour are situated on the east coast of Ireland four miles to the southeast of Balbriggan and twelve miles north of Howth. It offers a bay anchorage with the options of anchoring or picking up moorings off a popular small coastal town. Shallow draft vessels, or vessels that can take-to-the-hard, may come alongside its drying harbour wall or dry on its beach. get full information »

Loughshinny
A good location with straightforward access. 2.4 metres LWS. Loughshinny is a small cove on the east coast of Ireland, on the north coast of County Dublin and situated a mile and a half north of Rush Point and a similar distance south of Shenick Island, the southernmost of the Skerries Islands. Within the cove, there is a small boat fishing pier that dries at low water. Mooring possibilities include anchoring in the middle of the cove, drying out alongside the pier or a short stay alongside the head of the pier at high water. get full information »

Rush Harbour
An exposed location with straightforward access. 2 metres LWS. Rush Harbour is situated on the east coast of Ireland, on the north coast of County Dublin and immediately north of the rocky Rush Point. It offers an anchorage, off a village that has a small drying boat pier where boats that can take to the hard may come alongside and dry out. get full information »

Rogerstown Inlet
A good location with attentive navigation required for access. 1 metres LWS. Rogerstown Inlet is located on the east coast of Ireland, on the north coast of County Dublin, with the estuary's mouth separating the beaches of Donabate and Rush. It offers the potential of picking up vacant local moorings for shallow to moderate draft vessels if available by arrangement with the local sailing club. Boats that can take-to-the hard may also come alongside a small drying pier. get full information »

The Boat Harbour, Lambay Island
An exposed location with straightforward access. 2 metres LWS. Lambay Island is a small island on the east coast of Ireland situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. This secluded anchorage is off the island's drying boat harbour located on the island's western and mainland facing side. get full information »

Saltpan Bay, Lambay Island
A good location with straightforward access. 5 metres LWS. Lambay Island is a small island on the east coast of Ireland situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. Saltpan Bay, formerly Swallow Cove, is situated on the north side of the island close off the northwest point. get full information »

Seal Hole Bay, Lambay Island
A tolerable location with straightforward access. 3 metres LWS. Lambay Island is a small island on the east coast of Ireland situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. Seal Hole Bay is located off the middle of the east side of the island. get full information »

Talbot’s Bay, Lambay Island
A tolerable location with straightforward access. 5 metres LWS. Lambay Island is a small island off the east coast of Ireland situated two miles off the coast of North County Dublin and approximately six miles north of Howth. Talbot's Bay is located close south to the westernmost point of the island. get full information »

Malahide
A completely protected location with straightforward access. 0.8 metres LWS. Malahide is located on Ireland’s east coast approximately ten miles north of Dublin City and four miles north of Howth. It is a small vibrant seaside town and harbour that has a sailing club and a large scale fully serviced marina. get full information »

Carrigeen Bay, Ireland’s Eye
A tolerable location with straightforward access. 2 metres LWS. Ireland’s Eye is a small uninhabited island located off the north shore of the Howth peninsula immediately outside Howth Harbour on Ireland's east coast. Carrigeen Bay is situated on the west side of the island and offers a secluded anchorage. get full information »

Howth
A completely protected location with safe access. 2 metres LWS. Howth is an artificial harbour on Ireland's east coast that lies on the north side of the Howth Peninsula that is the northeast point of entrance to Dublin Bay. Protected by Ireland’s Eye, a rocky island that lies close offshore, the harbour is a centre for fishing and yachting and it offers excellent leisure boat facilities. It receives visitors in a marina operated by Howth Yacht Club and it is possible to anchor outside the pier in fair weather conditions. get full information »

Balscadden Bay
A good location with straightforward access. 3 metres LWS. Balscadden Bay is situated on the east coast of Ireland to the north of Dublin Bay and close southeast of Howth Harbour at the beginning of the harbour's east pier. The anchorage is a good location if a berth is unavailable in Howth Harbour and a perfectly serviceable anchorage outside in any event. get full information »

Dublin Port
A completely protected location with safe access. 7 metres LWS. Dublin Port is on the east coast of Ireland at the heart of the capital city. Boats visiting Dublin may berth at Poolbeg Yacht Club Marina on the south side of the river immediately downstream of the East Link Bridge or at the Dublin City Moorings further upriver. Anchoring is prohibited in the harbour area. get full information »

Dún Laoghaire Harbour
A completely protected location with safe access. 3 metres LWS. Dún Laoghaire is situated on the east coast of Ireland within the southern end of Dublin Bay. It is a busy town and extensive port that is the primary centre for yachting in Ireland. The harbour offers an 820 berth marina plus the moorings and jetty’s that belong to the four large local clubs based there. Anchoring is prohibited in the harbour area itself but it is possible to anchor outside. get full information »

Dalkey Island
An exposed location with straightforward access. 2 metres LWS. Dalkey Island lies off the east coast of Ireland on the southern point of the entrance to Dublin Bay and about two and a half miles southeast of Dún Laoghaire Harbour. The anchorage is in Dalkey Sound off the northwest corner of the uninhabited and interesting Dalkey Island. get full information »

Sorrento Point
An exposed location with straightforward access. 4 metres LWS. Sorrento Point is situated on the east coast of Ireland, immediately south of Dublin Bay, at the northern end of Killiney Bay and to the southwest of Dalkey Island. It offers an anchorage in a beautiful setting close to a popular beach. get full information »




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