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Brighton

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Overview





Brighton is a seaside resort on the south coast of England situated forty miles eastward of the Isle of Wight. It is a busy cosmopolitan city that offers visiting craft a large-scale marina complex.

Brighton is a seaside resort on the south coast of England situated forty miles eastward of the Isle of Wight. It is a busy cosmopolitan city that offers visiting craft a large-scale marina complex.

Brighton Marina offers complete protection from all conditions. The harbour’s well marked and the wide entrance provides safe access at all stages of tides, night and day, in all reasonable conditions except for a southeast gale. It is, however, not that deep and vessels carrying anything more than a moderate draft should check the available depth at low water.



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Keyfacts for Brighton



Last modified
January 25th 2019

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationPleasant family beach in the areaCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingMSD (marine sanitation device) pump out facilitiesHaul-out capabilities via arrangementMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesScuba diving cylinder refill capabilitiesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableHandicapped access supportedShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinityA secure location

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

50° 48.504' N, 000° 6.382' W

This is at the head of the West Breakwater that exhibits a light Q.R. 10m7M. The harbours southeast facing entrance is situated immediately to the north.

What is the initial fix?

The following Brighton Marina intial fix will set up a final approach:
50° 48.482' N, 000° 6.304' W
This is immediately outside the harbour\'s southeast facing entrance.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in the southeast England’s Coastal Overview for North Foreland to the Isle of Wight Route location.

  • Contact the marina on final approaches.

  • Moderatly deep craft should confirm the available depth in the entrance at low water.

  • Keep to the west side of the entrance channel for best water.



Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Brighton for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Shoreham - 3.4 miles W
  2. Newhaven - 4.1 miles ESE
  3. Littlehampton - 10.2 miles W
  4. Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 10.4 miles E
  5. Dell Quay - 16.7 miles W
  6. Chichester Marina - 16.9 miles W
  7. Birdham Pool Marina - 17 miles W
  8. Bosham - 17.8 miles W
  9. Itchenor - 17.9 miles W
  10. Chalkdock Point - 18.1 miles W
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Shoreham - 3.4 miles W
  2. Newhaven - 4.1 miles ESE
  3. Littlehampton - 10.2 miles W
  4. Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 10.4 miles E
  5. Dell Quay - 16.7 miles W
  6. Chichester Marina - 16.9 miles W
  7. Birdham Pool Marina - 17 miles W
  8. Bosham - 17.8 miles W
  9. Itchenor - 17.9 miles W
  10. Chalkdock Point - 18.1 miles W
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?
Brighton Marina as seen from the west
Image: Michael Harpur


Brighton is a seaside resort city on the south coast of England situated nine miles west of Newhaven. It is part of the city of Brighton and Hove with a population in excess of a quarter of a million, which makes for a sizable and cosmopolitan city. The extensive Brighton Marina, a large artificial harbour protected by two curved breakwaters, fronts the shore at the east end of the city and this is the only landing place the city offers.

The very large marina complex is operated by Premier Marinas and has up to 1,200 berths with ample reserved for visitors. It is capable of receiving boats up to 41 metres carrying a draft of 2.3 metres. The entrance channel is dredged to – 1.7 metres C.D. but storms cause shoaling on its eastern side between annual dredges. If operating on the margins the marina office will be delighted to advise on the current position. Brighton Marina Reception may be reached on VHF: Channel 80 or 37, P: +44 1273 819919.

Contact the marina office when approaching and the staff will allocate a berth. If it has not been possible to make contact go to pontoons No. 10 and 11 and make contact with the Marina Reception which is located on the first floor of the West Jetty. Marina staff will then allocate an appropriate berth.

Brighton and it's marina is conspicuous from many miles to seaward
Image: Ian Stannard via CC BY-SA 2.0


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in the southeast England’s Coastal Overview for North Foreland to the Isle of Wight Route location. The extensive marina will be seen to the east of the city enclosed by the arms of two curved breakwaters.

The outer West Breakwater that is 630 metres long and has a white round structure at its head, red bands, exhibiting a light Q.R. 1 sec 9.6m 7M. Within it is the 1220 metres long East Breakwater that has a beacon at its extremity, white pillar, green bands, QG 1 sec 8.3m 7M. The complex pierhead lights can be seen for several miles to seaward.

Vessels approaching from the west should give the head of the western breakwater a wide berth to avoid being surprised by a vessel exiting from behind the West Breakwater.

From the initial fix, the entrance faces southeast and lies between the heads of two breakwaters. Keep to the West Breakwater side of the channel if operating on the margins with a moderately deep craft until the East Breakwater Head is coming abeam.


Yacht approaching the inner entrance
Image: Peter Trimming via CC BY-SA 2.0


The entrance channel then bends eastward and is buoyed by red and green markers to the inner entrance. The inner entrance is flanked by the West Quay, on the north side, 2F Vert Red, and South Quay, 2F Vert Green opposite.


Visitors reception pontoons immediately inside the inner entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Beth as directed by the marina office. Alternatively come alongside the marina's reception pontoons, immediately within the inner entrance; No. 10 lies to port and or No. 11 is directly ahead. Make arrangements with the marina office based at the root of these pontoons on West Jetty.


Outer Harbour Pontoon Schema
Image: Michael Harpur


In addition to the outer marina, there is an inner basin with additional berths that can be entered through locks on the east side of the marina as best advised by the staff. The minimum depth in the inner basin is 2.4 metres and small craft up to a draught of 3.0 metres can be accepted.

Yacht anchored off the beach
Image: Garry Knight

It is possible in settled conditions or offshore winds to anchor off the beach ⅓ of a mile southwestward of the head of West Pier or the same distance southwestward of the Palace Pierhead.


Why visit here?
Brighton gets its name from Bristelmestune which was first recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book. The name means ‘farmstead or village (tún) of a man called Beorhthelm’ and the name Brighthelmstone was in use as late as 1823. The town's name Brighton, was first recorded in 1660 and it became the official name in 1810.

Brighton was once a small fishing town
Image: CC0


Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The Saxons landed in Sussex in the 5th-Century AD and they founded the kingdom of Sussex including the village of Brighton. Beorhthelm’ would have been a Saxon who lived in a village above the cliffs. Soon fishermen came to live under this cliff on the foreshore and it is thought they leveraged a small inlet at Pool Valley from which boats could be hauled up to safety.


Boats on Brighton Beach today
Image: Simon Carey via CC BY-SA 2.0
Strangely, on this inhospitable sweep of coastline open to the prevailing south-westerly gales, fishing became the mainstay of the early settlement. By Doomsday in 1086 Brighton was a large fishing village, which is evident from the rent of 4000 herrings. By 1285 it had a separate constable for overseeing the rent and by 1333 it was assessed to be half the assessment of Shoreham. By then Brighton had developed into a small town with four streets, North Street, West Street, East Street and South Street along with fishermen's huts along the shore. The Church of St Bartholomew in Brighton was first recorded in 1185. However, the community was not without its challenges.


The coast at Brighton was constantly being eroded by the sea. In 1340 a writer noted that the sea had recently 'swallowed' 40 acres of farmland. It was also vulnerable to attacks from the French who raised the fledgeling town to the ground in 1514 and attacked again, less successfully, in 1545. Then it was noted the French... 'came forth into the seas and arrived on the coast of Sussex before Brighthamstead and set certain of his soldiers on land to burn and spoil the country, but the beacons were lit and the inhabitants thereabout came down so thick, that the Frenchmen were driven to fly with loss of diverse of their numbers so that they did little hurt there'.

The Tudor landsmen and the fishing community did not, however, get along. In 1580 commissioners sent to decide disputes between the fishermen and landsmen found that from time immemorial Brighton had been governed by two headboroughs sitting in the borough court, and assisted by a council called the Twelve. This constitution disappeared before 1772, when commissioners were appointed. Nevertheless, the little town continued to prosper as a fishing town because of the fishery and fishing-related trades such as boatbuilding and sail, rope and net-making.


Brighton Beach Looking West - John Constable
Image: Michael Harpur


The fishing fleet at this time boasted eighty fishing boats, made up of a fleet of small inshore boats and large distant fishing vessels. These were manned by four hundred mariners who used ten thousand nets. The larger boats were up to forty tons and would go on 'fares' for weeks or months ranging down the English Channel but also up the east coast as far as Yarmouth and Scarborough. The smaller inshore boats fished locally and were drawn up on the beach after each trip.

Brighton, the front and the chain pier seen in the distance
Image: Frederick William Woledge (CC0)



But in the latter half of the 17th-Century, the fishing industry went into a long decline. This was caused in part by the encroachment of the sea, a suffering economy, declining population and a series of wars with France and Holland. Of these, the wars had the most detrimental effect as the enemies navies prevented fishing vessels from plying their trade. There was also the fear of attack as in 1694 a writer noted... 'Our poor town of Brighton has been this day suddenly surprised by 4 French ships and pestered by them since 11 am. As yet they have not done us much harm, having positioned themselves so near to us as to shoot over the town'. Two more French vessels arrived but the townsfolk took up arms and assembled to drive the French off.


Brighton Palace Pier Aerial View
Image: Ian Stannard via CC BY-SA 2.0


The 18th-century saw Brighton rediscover itself and blossom into an elegant vacation spot where England's elite relaxed in fashionable spas and hotels under the restorative influence of the sea air. Its popularity increased after the visit of George IV, Prince of Wales, to the Duke of Cumberland in 1783. This new direction was ensured by his building of the Pavilion in 1784-1787, and his adoption of it as his principal residence. His association with Mrs Fitzherbert at Brighton was the starting-point of its fashionable reputation.


Brighton Palace Pier
Image: CC0


By then, in the 1770s, travel from London to the coast had become possible within a day. By 1841, following the arrival of the railways, it was a morning trip from London to Brighton. Ease of access from London, Portsmouth, and the French coast, of which Brighton had become a boarding point for boats travelling across the channel, all helped to ensure the success of the resort. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. Many of the cities major attractions were built in the Victorian era and they remain to be enjoyed to this day: Charming Regency terraces, the delightful Palace Pier, the Metropole Hotel, now a "Hilton", the Grand Hotel, and the Royal Pavilion which was the exotic summer home of George IV, one of the country's most flamboyant and eccentric kings.

Royal Pavilion
Image: Peter Tarleton via CC BY-SA 2.0


The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining the town of Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000.

Lewes Crescent Regency buildings dating back to the 1820s
Image: Paul Gillett via CC BY-SA 2.0


Today Brighton is the largest and best-known seaside resort on the English Channel. Although Brighton's famous five mile long pebbly beaches are now lined with souvenir shops and amusement arcades, it remains a culturally vibrant city renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas and a large cultural, music and arts scene. Its large LGBT population has lead to its recognition as the 'unofficial gay capital of the UK. Brighton has also been called the UK's 'hippest city' and 'the happiest place to live in the UK'.


Sunset as seen from Brighton
Image: Joao Paulo Fernandes


From a sailing point of view, it is an ideal location to visit for a wide range of reasons. Protection is complete, entry and exit from the seaward is direct, it is totally uncomplicated in almost all weather conditions, and securing a berth in the marina is rarely ever a problem. Provisioning in every boating context, food, fuel, repairs, spares are all excellent and easily attended to. Leisure facilities are all immediately above the pontoons and one of England's most wonderfully vibrant cosmopolitan cities lies alongside. Finally, the city has excellent transport connections should there be a need to make arrangements for a change of crew, whilst leaving the vessel in complete security. Brighton Marina, has it all.


What facilities are available?
The marina and city offer all facilities. Water and electricity, up to £5 included in the berthing fee, on the pontoons, toilets and shower blocks and launderette. The marina amenity blocks are situated on both the East and West Jetties. WiFi is available via hotspots located throughout the marina for a charge.

Self-Serve diesel and petrol are available 24x7. Enter a payment card at the payment point, select the amount of fuel and grade required and wait for authorisation of the transaction, remove the nozzle from the pump and begin dispensing fuel. Self-service holding tank pump-out facilities are available on the West Jetty via arrangement with the Marina Reception for advice and tokens. Calor gas and camping gas exchanges are also available at the marina office. Brighton Marina Yacht Club, located afloat in the heart of Brighton Marina and surrounded by members’ boats, welcomes visitors.

There is a well-stocked chandler onsite and a wide range of specialist services from rigging to marine electronics, GRP repairs, cosmetic work and engineering. Should a vessel need to come out there is a 60-tonne boat hoist, 15-tonne Roodberg boat mover and a static crane used for mast work and engine lifts, plus a new mast rack. The marina has established itself as a quality boatyard and a one-stop shop for all boating needs.

An Asda superstore, and restaurant, with an ATM is located locally for provisioning. Almost anything else can be found in the city.

The nearest mainline station is Brighton with regular connections to Chichester and Portsmouth, and London is under an hour away. Brighton and Hove bus service operates a number 7 bus approximately every 15 minutes 24 hours a day, from Brighton Town Centre (North Street or Queens Road), to the Marina Village.


Any security concerns?
Access to the marina’s berthing is also protected with key fob activated security gates at the entrances to the east and west jetties. Premier Marinas operate 24-hour security patrols and 32 CCTV cameras protect the marina and its shoreside facilities. The marina is patrolled daily between 7am and 7pm and a Berthing Master patrols the marina twice at night.


With thanks to:
eOceanic


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.




Brighton Marina, Sussex, England.
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Brighton Marina, Sussex, England.
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Pontoon's No. 7, 8 & 9
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Pontoon's No. 20
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Brighton Marina Yacht Club (BMYC) afloat in the heart of Brighton Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Cafés, wine bars and restaurants overlooking the marina
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur


Cafés, wine bars and restaurants overlooking the marina
Image: eOceanic thanks Michael Harpur




Brighton Marina Aerial


About Brighton

Brighton gets its name from Bristelmestune which was first recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book. The name means ‘farmstead or village (tún) of a man called Beorhthelm’ and the name Brighthelmstone was in use as late as 1823. The town's name Brighton, was first recorded in 1660 and it became the official name in 1810.

Brighton was once a small fishing town
Image: CC0


Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The Saxons landed in Sussex in the 5th-Century AD and they founded the kingdom of Sussex including the village of Brighton. Beorhthelm’ would have been a Saxon who lived in a village above the cliffs. Soon fishermen came to live under this cliff on the foreshore and it is thought they leveraged a small inlet at Pool Valley from which boats could be hauled up to safety.


Boats on Brighton Beach today
Image: Simon Carey via CC BY-SA 2.0
Strangely, on this inhospitable sweep of coastline open to the prevailing south-westerly gales, fishing became the mainstay of the early settlement. By Doomsday in 1086 Brighton was a large fishing village, which is evident from the rent of 4000 herrings. By 1285 it had a separate constable for overseeing the rent and by 1333 it was assessed to be half the assessment of Shoreham. By then Brighton had developed into a small town with four streets, North Street, West Street, East Street and South Street along with fishermen's huts along the shore. The Church of St Bartholomew in Brighton was first recorded in 1185. However, the community was not without its challenges.


The coast at Brighton was constantly being eroded by the sea. In 1340 a writer noted that the sea had recently 'swallowed' 40 acres of farmland. It was also vulnerable to attacks from the French who raised the fledgeling town to the ground in 1514 and attacked again, less successfully, in 1545. Then it was noted the French... 'came forth into the seas and arrived on the coast of Sussex before Brighthamstead and set certain of his soldiers on land to burn and spoil the country, but the beacons were lit and the inhabitants thereabout came down so thick, that the Frenchmen were driven to fly with loss of diverse of their numbers so that they did little hurt there'.

The Tudor landsmen and the fishing community did not, however, get along. In 1580 commissioners sent to decide disputes between the fishermen and landsmen found that from time immemorial Brighton had been governed by two headboroughs sitting in the borough court, and assisted by a council called the Twelve. This constitution disappeared before 1772, when commissioners were appointed. Nevertheless, the little town continued to prosper as a fishing town because of the fishery and fishing-related trades such as boatbuilding and sail, rope and net-making.


Brighton Beach Looking West - John Constable
Image: Michael Harpur


The fishing fleet at this time boasted eighty fishing boats, made up of a fleet of small inshore boats and large distant fishing vessels. These were manned by four hundred mariners who used ten thousand nets. The larger boats were up to forty tons and would go on 'fares' for weeks or months ranging down the English Channel but also up the east coast as far as Yarmouth and Scarborough. The smaller inshore boats fished locally and were drawn up on the beach after each trip.

Brighton, the front and the chain pier seen in the distance
Image: Frederick William Woledge (CC0)



But in the latter half of the 17th-Century, the fishing industry went into a long decline. This was caused in part by the encroachment of the sea, a suffering economy, declining population and a series of wars with France and Holland. Of these, the wars had the most detrimental effect as the enemies navies prevented fishing vessels from plying their trade. There was also the fear of attack as in 1694 a writer noted... 'Our poor town of Brighton has been this day suddenly surprised by 4 French ships and pestered by them since 11 am. As yet they have not done us much harm, having positioned themselves so near to us as to shoot over the town'. Two more French vessels arrived but the townsfolk took up arms and assembled to drive the French off.


Brighton Palace Pier Aerial View
Image: Ian Stannard via CC BY-SA 2.0


The 18th-century saw Brighton rediscover itself and blossom into an elegant vacation spot where England's elite relaxed in fashionable spas and hotels under the restorative influence of the sea air. Its popularity increased after the visit of George IV, Prince of Wales, to the Duke of Cumberland in 1783. This new direction was ensured by his building of the Pavilion in 1784-1787, and his adoption of it as his principal residence. His association with Mrs Fitzherbert at Brighton was the starting-point of its fashionable reputation.


Brighton Palace Pier
Image: CC0


By then, in the 1770s, travel from London to the coast had become possible within a day. By 1841, following the arrival of the railways, it was a morning trip from London to Brighton. Ease of access from London, Portsmouth, and the French coast, of which Brighton had become a boarding point for boats travelling across the channel, all helped to ensure the success of the resort. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. Many of the cities major attractions were built in the Victorian era and they remain to be enjoyed to this day: Charming Regency terraces, the delightful Palace Pier, the Metropole Hotel, now a "Hilton", the Grand Hotel, and the Royal Pavilion which was the exotic summer home of George IV, one of the country's most flamboyant and eccentric kings.

Royal Pavilion
Image: Peter Tarleton via CC BY-SA 2.0


The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining the town of Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000.

Lewes Crescent Regency buildings dating back to the 1820s
Image: Paul Gillett via CC BY-SA 2.0


Today Brighton is the largest and best-known seaside resort on the English Channel. Although Brighton's famous five mile long pebbly beaches are now lined with souvenir shops and amusement arcades, it remains a culturally vibrant city renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas and a large cultural, music and arts scene. Its large LGBT population has lead to its recognition as the 'unofficial gay capital of the UK. Brighton has also been called the UK's 'hippest city' and 'the happiest place to live in the UK'.


Sunset as seen from Brighton
Image: Joao Paulo Fernandes


From a sailing point of view, it is an ideal location to visit for a wide range of reasons. Protection is complete, entry and exit from the seaward is direct, it is totally uncomplicated in almost all weather conditions, and securing a berth in the marina is rarely ever a problem. Provisioning in every boating context, food, fuel, repairs, spares are all excellent and easily attended to. Leisure facilities are all immediately above the pontoons and one of England's most wonderfully vibrant cosmopolitan cities lies alongside. Finally, the city has excellent transport connections should there be a need to make arrangements for a change of crew, whilst leaving the vessel in complete security. Brighton Marina, has it all.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Shoreham - 3.4 miles W
Littlehampton - 10.2 miles W
East Head - 19 miles W
Chalkdock Point - 18.1 miles W
Itchenor - 17.9 miles W
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Newhaven - 4.1 miles ESE
Sovereign Harbour (Eastbourne Marina) - 10.4 miles E
Rye Harbour - 21.2 miles ENE
Folkestone - 32.1 miles ENE
Dover - 35.5 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Brighton.




































Brighton Marina Aerial



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