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Island Harbour Marine

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Overview





Island Harbour Marina is located off the south coast of England within The Solent and on the east side of the River Medina on the Isle of Wight. It is situated in a rural part of the island’s countryside about two and a half miles above the island’s principal port of Cowes. At low water the final approaches to the marina dry and it maintains its depths via lock gates at its entrance.

Island Harbour Marina is located off the south coast of England within The Solent and on the east side of the River Medina on the Isle of Wight. It is situated in a rural part of the island’s countryside about two and a half miles above the island’s principal port of Cowes. At low water the final approaches to the marina dry and it maintains its depths via lock gates at its entrance.

Set upriver, in the middle of the island and behind lock gates the marina offers complete protection from all conditions. Safe access may be had in all reasonable conditions during daylight.



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Keyfacts for Island Harbour Marine



Last modified
August 24th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableShop with basic provisions availableSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this location


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesNavigation lights to support a night approach

Considerations
Restriction: rising tide required for accessNote: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

50° 43.511' N, 001° 16.793' W

This is set at the entrance to Island Harbour Marine's lock gates.


What are the key points of the approach?

The entry and the run-up thorough The Solent and Southampton Water are covered in
The Solent and Isle of Wight Route location Coastal Overview. The approaches and run up the fairway are detailed in the Folly Inn Click to view haven entry.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Island Harbour Marine for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Folly Inn - 0.3 miles N
  2. Newport - 0.8 miles SSW
  3. East Cowes Marina - 1.1 miles NNW
  4. Shepards Wharf - 1.3 miles NNW
  5. Osborne Bay - 1.4 miles NNE
  6. Cowes Yacht Haven - 1.4 miles NNW
  7. Wootton Creek (Fishbourne) - 1.6 miles ENE
  8. Cowes Harbour - 1.6 miles NNW
  9. Thorness Bay - 2.1 miles WNW
  10. Ryde Roads - 2.3 miles ENE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Folly Inn - 0.3 miles N
  2. Newport - 0.8 miles SSW
  3. East Cowes Marina - 1.1 miles NNW
  4. Shepards Wharf - 1.3 miles NNW
  5. Osborne Bay - 1.4 miles NNE
  6. Cowes Yacht Haven - 1.4 miles NNW
  7. Wootton Creek (Fishbourne) - 1.6 miles ENE
  8. Cowes Harbour - 1.6 miles NNW
  9. Thorness Bay - 2.1 miles WNW
  10. Ryde Roads - 2.3 miles ENE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?


Island Harbour Marina is a commercial marina on the east bank of the River Medina in the small hamlet of Binfield. The marina is located approximately ½ way between the Isle of Wight’s principal port of Cowes and its County Town of Newport but set in a rural secluded valley. Its site is pleasantly undeveloped and surrounded by the river on one side and green pastoral fields on the other.

The marina is located on the east or port side of the river a little under three miles upriver and southwards of the entrance’s No. 1 and No. 2 buoys where the Medina is tidal. Sufficient operational depth is maintained within the marina via lock gates. It has 200 berths in all and can cater for boats up to 15.2 metres (50ft) LOA with a draft of 2.1 metres.

The river is navigable for boats up to 1.8 metres draught to Folly Inn after which it quickly dries. Access to the marina, located ½ a mile above the Folly Inn, is dependent on the state of the tide and the requisite draught.

The following are guidelines are based on the tide times for Cowes:
  • • Up to 0.91 metres (3 ft.) should have access 5 hours before and 4½ hours after high water during Spring tides. They should only be restricted by office hours during Neap tides.

  • • Up to 1.22 metres (4 ft.) should have access +/- 4½ hours either side of a high water Spring tides and be only restricted by 1 hour during Neaps.

  • • Up to 1.52 metres (5 ft.) should have access +/- 3½ hours either side of all tidal cycles.

  • • Up to 1.83 metres (6 ft.) should have access 3 before and 3½ hours after high water Spring tides. Access should be 2 before and 2 ½ hours after high water during Neap tides.

  • • Up to 2.0 metres (6½ ft.) should have access +/- 2 hours either side of a high water of all tidal cycles.

  • • Up to 2.1 metres (6¾ ft.)+/- 2 hours either side of a high water during Spring tides but check with the marina office during Neaps.

Tidal heights can vary depending upon atmospheric conditions and it is advisable to add a safety margin of at least ½ hour to the above times especially so on a falling tide. If operating on the margins, or in any doubt, it is always best to check with the Harbour Office.

In all cases is recommended that advances bookings are made with the marina call sign [Island Harbour] on VHF Ch. 80 or +44 1983 539 994 or via email on info@island-harbour.co.uk Vessels intending on berthing in the marina should notify the Lock Control Tower when in Folly Reach, on the approaches to the Folly Inn.





Convergance Point The approaches to Cowes and the run up the River Medina fairway are detailed in the Folly Inn Click to view haven entry.


Just above the Folly Inn the river widens out into Folly Lake, but also shoals with less than a metre available in its deepest parts at low water Springs. Best water is to be found by following the lines of mooring piles south of the Folly Inn then steering straight for the green starboard navigational buoy directly opposite the lock gates and the marina holding pontoon.




The channel, which previously went out at 45° from the holding pontoon, now runs parallel to the outer waiting pontoon. Bring the starboard-hand buoy abeam and then turn 90° degrees to port in towards the lock and keep on this line until abeam of the holding pontoon or the vessel has entered the lock gates. Beware of the mudbanks either side of the entry channel and stay within the channel markers.



The lock is 24.4 metres long and 9.1 metres wide. All movements through it are directed from a prominent white overlooking control tower, along with red or green traffic lights.




Haven location Berth as directed by the lock keeper.






Why visit here?
The area that Island Harbour Marina occupies began life as the two mill ponds for a tide mill called the East Medina Mill. However this was not the first mill here and it is believed in around the year 1250 monks dammed the site and built the first mill on this spot. It is believed that the abbey transported its wool to Southampton from a quay alongside the mill.

East Medina Mill was built in 1790 by William Porter and the mill itself stood above the current marina lock gates. Porter was a baker from Newport and he built the mill in partnership with a Newport hairdresser called William Gregory. The mill house was a substantial building being about 25 metres long 10 metres wide and was made up of five floors. Corn was unloaded from vessels of up to 70 tons that could come alongside the mill’s quay. Then its undershot wheel, two sets of barley stones, one American wheat cutter, one oat cutter, and three pairs of French stones would grind through thirty loads of wheat per week. The resultant flour was left to dry on the mills flat roof before being bagged and placed in the storehouse, in the southern half of the mill, to await loading back into the boats alongside the quay. Alongside the storehouse there was also a bake house that produced breads and biscuits. At the time of the mill’s construction the Medina served as a mooring place for Australia bound convict transports. It is believed that these ships purchased ‘ship’s biscuits’ from the mill earning it the local name of the ‘Botany Bay Mill’.

East Medina Mill’s water wheel was excellently placed and when it impounded a Spring tide into its two mill ponds they produced sufficient flow for the mill to operate for six hours. The mill was a total success and became one of the great English tide mills but William Porter was not to benefit from his great endeavour, far from it. Being overly ambitious his East Medina Mill was part of a three mill project, with a corresponding mill on the western bank of the Medina called ‘West Medina Mill’, locally nicknamed 'Port Jackson', and the Yarmouth Mill being built at the same time. Porter had vastly over-stretched himself and 'The Newport Bank', who was financing all the mills, became nervous from the outset. They foreclosed on the loan in 1791 and Porter was declared bankrupt before the completion of his mills. He died a few years later in 1794 leaving his pregnant wife and four small children destitute.

After Porter’s bankruptcy William Roach took on the lease of the mills and in 1797 bought them outright. The mills were too remain in his family for eight generations over the next 140 years. In their time as millers they shared their mills with King George III's troops. From the outset East Medina Mill was a barracks and hospital for Hessian mercenaries from Germany and Prussia. During their tenure eighty four of their number fell victim to typhus and were buried in the Whippingham Church. A memorial was placed in the church’s graveyard, close to the Folly Inn, in 1906. West Medina Mill barracked the Dutch soldiers of Count Bentinck's regiment. Notably amongst the deployments of these troops was the quelling of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. In the early 1800s Napoleonic wars East Medina Mill was used to hold French prisoners of war.


In 1930 the mill was badly damaged by a terrible storm that ripped off most of its roof and sent it flying into cottages as far as 100 metres away. In 1933, the ageing John Roach, last in the line of the milling family, sold the mill to the local Council but stayed on as a tenant until September 1937 when he finally ceased operations there. He owned and continued milling in West Mill and Lower Shide Mills until he finally retired a couple of years later at the age of 78. The Borough of Newport used the East Mill as a storehouse for waste material but allowed it to fall into a state of disrepair. In 1945 a major fire was to destroy half of the building and what remained was abandoned until 1950 when it was finally demolished.




In the 1960s the brothers Alan and Colin Ridett enlarged the original millponds and turned them into a marina. They bought the Paddle Steamer Medway Queen, which arrived in 1965 to act as the marina's first clubhouse. Over the intervening half century the marina changed hands a number of times, with the current owners buying it in January 2013. During this time the marina has been known by a succession of names, such as Binfield Marina, Wight Marina, Medina Yacht Harbour. It took its current name Island Harbour Marina in 1987.


The derelict paddle ship immediately outside the marina is not the remains of the Paddle Steamer Medway Queen but that of PS Ryde. Island Harbour has long been associated with a number of paddle steamers operating as floating nightclubs and restaurants. PS Ryde was commissioned and run by Southern Railway as a passenger ferry that crossed the Solent between the mainland and the Isle of Wight from 1937 to 1969. During this time PS Ryde saw wartime service that included active duty during D Day at Omaha Beach. After her ferry service ended in 1970 PS Ryde was rescued from the breakers yard and extensively re-fitted as a restaurant and nightclub. She was badly damaged by a fire in 1977 which led to her temporary closure. However, she re-opened and carried on until 1989, when her deteriorating condition forced her to close for the last time. Abandoned on moorings from that time, scrapping started in 2010 but was halted. The new owners of the marina are currently looking into the feasibility of still saving her.




From a sailing perspective Island Harbour Marina offers unparalleled protection in a very unusual and idyllic rural setting. Surrounded by green fields and riverbank walks it is a world away from the bustle of Cowes. The marinas extensive open grassy areas make it ideal for barbecues, children and family pets. Younger children may also make use of the children’s’ play area, and older ones may note the marina’s close proximity to the IOW Music Festival ground. Those who just want to relax will find a very pleasant restaurant and bar with good food and a nice atmosphere on site. A new riverbank cycle-way has recently been completed between the marina and Newport with further plans for it to be extended to the Folly Inn in the future.


What facilities are available?
All pontoons are fully serviced with water and power. A new customer shower block, completed in June 2015, provides excellent shower and toilet facilities. It also has laundry facilities, free wireless broadband internet access, and rubbish and waste oil disposal facilities. The marina has an arrangement with ‘Wight Cycle Hire’ for daily bike rental.

Full boatyard facilities can be found ashore including a chandlery and an on-site boat builder and repair workshop that can cater for most issues. The yard has a 50-ton travel hoist and a hardstanding area that can hold about 100 boats ashore fully furnished with water and electricity. There is an on-site restaurant and a small basics shop.

Petrol and diesel can be had on the river approaches, and are available from Lallow's Boatyard, between Cowes Yacht Haven and Shepards Wharf or more conveniently from Cowes Harbour Fuels barge close south of the chain ferry, +44 1983 200716. Cowes Harbour Fuels also supply Calor gas. The Town Quay has scrubbing berths next to the Harbour Office. Cowes as a whole offers almost any conceivable marine service or facility a vessel could require.

Newport, the County Town of the Island, with its abundance of pubs, shops and restaurants, is a pleasant 30 minute walk along the new river-way cycle-path. A Waterbus provides a river link between Cowes, East Cowes, The Folly, Island Harbour and Newport along the River Medina. VHF Ch. 77 M: +44 7974 864 627


Any security concerns?
The entire marina, gates and carpark areas are continuously monitored by a CCTV system.


With thanks to:
Michael Harpur S/Y Whistler. Photography Michael Harpur, Razzladazzla, Gareth James and Ian Taylor.


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The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with the approaches to the River Medina and the run up to the marina as well as Island Harbour Marina.

This short Island Harbour Marina video shows aerial views of the marina that include vies of the lock entry.




This East Cowes Marina video presents the run up the river, in a RIB, from Prince Consort North Cardinal to East Cowes Marina.





About Island Harbour Marine

The area that Island Harbour Marina occupies began life as the two mill ponds for a tide mill called the East Medina Mill. However this was not the first mill here and it is believed in around the year 1250 monks dammed the site and built the first mill on this spot. It is believed that the abbey transported its wool to Southampton from a quay alongside the mill.

East Medina Mill was built in 1790 by William Porter and the mill itself stood above the current marina lock gates. Porter was a baker from Newport and he built the mill in partnership with a Newport hairdresser called William Gregory. The mill house was a substantial building being about 25 metres long 10 metres wide and was made up of five floors. Corn was unloaded from vessels of up to 70 tons that could come alongside the mill’s quay. Then its undershot wheel, two sets of barley stones, one American wheat cutter, one oat cutter, and three pairs of French stones would grind through thirty loads of wheat per week. The resultant flour was left to dry on the mills flat roof before being bagged and placed in the storehouse, in the southern half of the mill, to await loading back into the boats alongside the quay. Alongside the storehouse there was also a bake house that produced breads and biscuits. At the time of the mill’s construction the Medina served as a mooring place for Australia bound convict transports. It is believed that these ships purchased ‘ship’s biscuits’ from the mill earning it the local name of the ‘Botany Bay Mill’.

East Medina Mill’s water wheel was excellently placed and when it impounded a Spring tide into its two mill ponds they produced sufficient flow for the mill to operate for six hours. The mill was a total success and became one of the great English tide mills but William Porter was not to benefit from his great endeavour, far from it. Being overly ambitious his East Medina Mill was part of a three mill project, with a corresponding mill on the western bank of the Medina called ‘West Medina Mill’, locally nicknamed 'Port Jackson', and the Yarmouth Mill being built at the same time. Porter had vastly over-stretched himself and 'The Newport Bank', who was financing all the mills, became nervous from the outset. They foreclosed on the loan in 1791 and Porter was declared bankrupt before the completion of his mills. He died a few years later in 1794 leaving his pregnant wife and four small children destitute.

After Porter’s bankruptcy William Roach took on the lease of the mills and in 1797 bought them outright. The mills were too remain in his family for eight generations over the next 140 years. In their time as millers they shared their mills with King George III's troops. From the outset East Medina Mill was a barracks and hospital for Hessian mercenaries from Germany and Prussia. During their tenure eighty four of their number fell victim to typhus and were buried in the Whippingham Church. A memorial was placed in the church’s graveyard, close to the Folly Inn, in 1906. West Medina Mill barracked the Dutch soldiers of Count Bentinck's regiment. Notably amongst the deployments of these troops was the quelling of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. In the early 1800s Napoleonic wars East Medina Mill was used to hold French prisoners of war.


In 1930 the mill was badly damaged by a terrible storm that ripped off most of its roof and sent it flying into cottages as far as 100 metres away. In 1933, the ageing John Roach, last in the line of the milling family, sold the mill to the local Council but stayed on as a tenant until September 1937 when he finally ceased operations there. He owned and continued milling in West Mill and Lower Shide Mills until he finally retired a couple of years later at the age of 78. The Borough of Newport used the East Mill as a storehouse for waste material but allowed it to fall into a state of disrepair. In 1945 a major fire was to destroy half of the building and what remained was abandoned until 1950 when it was finally demolished.




In the 1960s the brothers Alan and Colin Ridett enlarged the original millponds and turned them into a marina. They bought the Paddle Steamer Medway Queen, which arrived in 1965 to act as the marina's first clubhouse. Over the intervening half century the marina changed hands a number of times, with the current owners buying it in January 2013. During this time the marina has been known by a succession of names, such as Binfield Marina, Wight Marina, Medina Yacht Harbour. It took its current name Island Harbour Marina in 1987.


The derelict paddle ship immediately outside the marina is not the remains of the Paddle Steamer Medway Queen but that of PS Ryde. Island Harbour has long been associated with a number of paddle steamers operating as floating nightclubs and restaurants. PS Ryde was commissioned and run by Southern Railway as a passenger ferry that crossed the Solent between the mainland and the Isle of Wight from 1937 to 1969. During this time PS Ryde saw wartime service that included active duty during D Day at Omaha Beach. After her ferry service ended in 1970 PS Ryde was rescued from the breakers yard and extensively re-fitted as a restaurant and nightclub. She was badly damaged by a fire in 1977 which led to her temporary closure. However, she re-opened and carried on until 1989, when her deteriorating condition forced her to close for the last time. Abandoned on moorings from that time, scrapping started in 2010 but was halted. The new owners of the marina are currently looking into the feasibility of still saving her.




From a sailing perspective Island Harbour Marina offers unparalleled protection in a very unusual and idyllic rural setting. Surrounded by green fields and riverbank walks it is a world away from the bustle of Cowes. The marinas extensive open grassy areas make it ideal for barbecues, children and family pets. Younger children may also make use of the children’s’ play area, and older ones may note the marina’s close proximity to the IOW Music Festival ground. Those who just want to relax will find a very pleasant restaurant and bar with good food and a nice atmosphere on site. A new riverbank cycle-way has recently been completed between the marina and Newport with further plans for it to be extended to the Folly Inn in the future.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Folly Inn - 0.3 miles N
East Cowes Marina - 1.1 miles NNW
Osborne Bay - 1.4 miles NNE
Wootton Creek (Fishbourne) - 1.6 miles ENE
Ryde Roads - 2.3 miles ENE
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Newport - 0.8 miles SSW
Shepards Wharf - 1.3 miles NNW
Cowes Yacht Haven - 1.4 miles NNW
Cowes Harbour - 1.6 miles NNW
Thorness Bay - 2.1 miles WNW

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Island Harbour Marine.




























The following videos may be useful to help first time visitors familiarise themselves with the approaches to the River Medina and the run up to the marina as well as Island Harbour Marina.

This short Island Harbour Marina video shows aerial views of the marina that include vies of the lock entry.




This East Cowes Marina video presents the run up the river, in a RIB, from Prince Consort North Cardinal to East Cowes Marina.






A photograph is worth a thousand words. We are always looking for bright sunny photographs that show this haven and its identifiable features at its best. If you have some images that we could use please upload them here. All we need to know is how you would like to be credited for your work and a brief description of the image if it is not readily apparent. If you would like us to add a hyperlink from the image that goes back to your site please include the desired link and we will be delighted to that for you.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.