England Ireland Find Havens
England Ireland Find Routes
Boat
Maintenance
Comfort
Operations
Safety
Other








Cobh is situated on the south coast of Ireland within Cork’s extensive natural harbour. This haven is located on the southern shoreline of Great Island, opposite Haulbowline Island. It offers a seasonal pontoon in the heart of Cobh town.

Cobh is situated on the south coast of Ireland within Cork’s extensive natural harbour. This haven is located on the southern shoreline of Great Island, opposite Haulbowline Island. It offers a seasonal pontoon in the heart of Cobh town.

Being well within the 'Cove of Cork' the pontoon berth offers complete protection. Safe access is assured in all reasonable conditions by Cork Harbour, one of the most easily approached, well-marked and safest natural harbours in the world.
Please note

Although the Lower Harbour is very well marked for night navigation, owing to Cobh’s lights and the vast amount of markers, first-time visitors should prefer a day entry as it may prove challenging at night.




Be the first
to comment
Keyfacts for Cobh



Last modified
July 15th 2020

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore based toilet facilitiesHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaInternet via a wireless access point availableDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Approved port for vessels requiring clearance to lawfully enter the countryMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesNavigation lights to support a night approachUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
None listed



Position and approaches
Expand to new tab or fullscreen

Haven position

51° 50.925' N, 008° 17.850' W

This is the position of the pontoon off The Quays.

What is the initial fix?

The following Cork Harbour initial will set up a final approach:
51° 46.580' N, 008° 15.460' W
This waypoint is a mile out from the entrance and near the Outflow Marker Fl(Y) 20s. It is set on the alignment of 354° (T) of the Dogsnose leading lights that are situated on the east side of Cork Harbour entrance. This waypoint sets up an east channel approach but a vessel may alter course to and enter via the west channel.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s coastal overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Use the directions provided for Cork City Marina Click to view haven for the entry and run up through Cork Harbour.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cobh for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Spike Island - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Cuskinny - 0.7 miles ENE
  3. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.8 miles W
  4. Glenbrook - 0.9 miles WNW
  5. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles S
  6. Drake’s Pool - 1.8 miles SSW
  7. White Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Aghada - 2 miles E
  9. East Ferry Marina - 2 miles ENE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 2.5 miles ENE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Spike Island - 0.4 miles SSE
  2. Cuskinny - 0.7 miles ENE
  3. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.8 miles W
  4. Glenbrook - 0.9 miles WNW
  5. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles S
  6. Drake’s Pool - 1.8 miles SSW
  7. White Bay - 1.9 miles SSE
  8. Aghada - 2 miles E
  9. East Ferry Marina - 2 miles ENE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 2.5 miles ENE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



What's the story here?
Cobh
Image: John Finn


Cobh is a sizable town with a population of about 1300 that stands on the south side of Great Island in the middle of Cork Harbour. It is situated on a narrow rising hill that overlooks the harbour. With the town centre rising steeply to be crowned by the Cathedral of St. Colman, one of the tallest buildings in Ireland, it presents a dramatic appearance when approached from seaward. The town is home to the harbour’s Port Operations Centre and the port's harbour pilot launches are based at the Camber pier at the town’s eastern end. It is also home to Ireland's only dedicated cruise terminal and it overlooks Haulbowline Island the HQ of the Irish Naval Service on the opposite side of Cobh Road.


The Quays Bar & Restaurant pontoon
Image: Gary Bembridge via CC BY SA 2.0


A few small quays and boat harbours line the shore abreast the town but it has until recently surprisingly limited berthing options. There has been a recreational berthing pontoon owned by The Quays Bar & Restaurant External link that has a large outdoor seating area above. There is no fee for the berth, but users should reciprocate pontoon use by providing good custom to the 'The Quays' which is an ideal location to enjoy the scenery of Cobh Harbour. A vessel may overnight with permission of The Quays manager, Landline+353 (0) 21 4813539, E-mailadmin@thequays.ie, open daily during the season 12pm-11pm. But always remember a vessel berthed here is staying at their good graces.


Phase One of the Cove Sailing Club marina
Image: Cove Sailing Club


Fortunately, Cove Sailing Club has opened a new marina (opened July 2020) at Whitepoint to the west of Cobh town. This is the first 30-berth-phase of the two-phase build that will result in a 74-berth marina of which there will be a minimum of ten berths available to visitors. The marina can cater for vessels of up to 15 metres LOA and support depths of up to 11 metres. It is located in the area between the current cruise terminal and White Point. The Cove Sailing Club web site External link provides a separate rate card page External link with visitor instruction. The club may also be contacted by E-mailinfo@covesailingclub.ie.



For overnight berthing call the club mobile Mobile+353 (0) 87 117 8363 and you will be provided details on where to berth and access to and from the marina.

There is also one other possibility for those with a capable outboard and tender and that is to anchor Cuskinny, just over 1 mile east and out of the hustle and bustle, that would most likely present a more restful option for those a less interested in nightlife.


How to get in?
St Colman's Cathedral can be seen from the entrance to and throughout Cork Harbour
Image: Tourism Ireland


Convergance Point The run up the Lower Harbour to Cobh Road is best described in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry. St Colman's Cathedral standing on a high point overlooking the town makes the town conspicuous for many miles. The pontoon is in Cobh Road opposite Haulbowline Island.


Yachts alongside in the pontoon
Image: Adrian Hon via CC BY 2.0


The distinctive yellow Sirius Arts Centre will be seen and 'The Quays Bar & Restaurant' above the gangplank. The pier immediately east of this is only for tour boats to Spike Island. To the west is the deep-water liner pier and then the marina is in the area between the terminal and White Point.


Cove Sailing Club beyond the cruiser terminal
Image: Cove Sailing Club


Haven location Berth as arranged with the club or the restaurant. Berth numbers for Cove Sailing Club's pontoons are available on their detailed marina planExternal link.

Cove Sailing Club’s Marina Plan
Image: Cove Sailing Club



Why visit here?
Cobh has had many names down through the ages. The current Cobh, in Irish 'An Cóbh', has no Irish language meaning and is a gaelicisation of the English name of 'Cove'. This name was first recorded in 1750 for the area, and prior to that the settlement was known as 'Ballyvoloon' that overlooked 'The Cove', which became the ' The Cove of Cork', and then simply 'Cove'.


Early warship off Haulbowline Island
Image: Public Domain
In 1849 the area was renamed 'Queenstown' to commemorate a visit by Queen Victoria in that year. This remained the town's name until 1922 when, with the foundation of the Irish Free State, it was renamed Cobh once again.

Cobh has an extraordinarily strong maritime heritage that touches all phases of Irish history. Most notably Haulbowline Island that it overlooks comes directly from 'a warship of the line's' command 'Haul bow lines' meaning 'prepare to go about' as it was a bustling base that was commanded by an Admiral of the fleet