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Crosshaven

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Overview





Situated on the south coast of Ireland, within Cork’s extensive natural harbour, Crosshaven is a national centre for Irish sailing activity. It offers a choice of marinas and moorings alongside a village with good access to Ireland’s second-largest city of cork.

Approached through Cork's Lower Harbour and upriver Crosshaven offers complete protection from all conditions. Safe access is assured in all reasonable conditions by Cork Harbour, one of the most easily approached, well-marked and safest natural harbours in the world.



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Keyfacts for Crosshaven
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
4 metres (13.12 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
July 7th 2020

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsidePetrol available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaSlipway availableLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingHaul-out capabilities via arrangementBoatyard with hard-standing available here; covered or uncoveredScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaRigging services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationMarina or pontoon berthing facilitiesAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 48.321' N, 008° 17.988' W

The northeastern most berth of Royal Cork Yacht Club marina.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s coastal overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Use the directions provided for Cork City Marina Click to view haven for the entry and run up through Cork Harbour.

  • Round Ram's Head stand off about 400 metres.

  • Pick up the fairway's two pairs of later buoys and the single one in the river mouth.

  • Keep over to the quay and south side on final approches.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Crosshaven for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Drake’s Pool - 0.8 miles W
  2. White Bay - 1.1 miles E
  3. Spike Island - 1.2 miles N
  4. Ringabella Bay - 1.3 miles S
  5. Cobh - 1.6 miles N
  6. Cork Harbour Marina - 1.6 miles NNW
  7. Cuskinny - 2 miles NNE
  8. Glenbrook - 2.1 miles NNW
  9. Robert's Cove - 2.4 miles S
  10. Aghada - 2.6 miles NE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Drake’s Pool - 0.8 miles W
  2. White Bay - 1.1 miles E
  3. Spike Island - 1.2 miles N
  4. Ringabella Bay - 1.3 miles S
  5. Cobh - 1.6 miles N
  6. Cork Harbour Marina - 1.6 miles NNW
  7. Cuskinny - 2 miles NNE
  8. Glenbrook - 2.1 miles NNW
  9. Robert's Cove - 2.4 miles S
  10. Aghada - 2.6 miles NE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Crosshaven, the heart of sailing in Cork
Image: Michael Harpur


Crosshaven is a village set on the southern hillside overlooking the mouth of the Owenboy River, also spelt 'Owenabue', that is protected from the north by the wooded Currabinny peninsula. It is located just inside the entrance to Cork Harbour and the river is accessed from the western side of the protected Lower Harbour. Originally a fishing village, the economy of the area is driven today by the tourism industry. The village is now the principal centre for the boating industry in Cork and it boasts many clubs, recreational boating resources and marina berths. It is most famous in boating circles for being the home of the Royal Cork Yacht Club (RCYC), the oldest sailing club in the world who, in turn, has elevated Crosshaven onto the international stage by hosting their much enjoyed biannual Regatta of Cork Week.


Crosshaven is famous for being at the heart of the Cork Week Regatta
Image: Tourism Ireland


The harbour has three marinas and a town quay which are all located on the south bank of the river close inside the entrance. They are, in order, Crosshaven Boatyard Marina, the Town Pier, Salve Marine and immediately above it is the Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina that is about a ¼ of a mile above Crosshaven Boatyard.


Crosshaven Boatyard with Salve behind and Royal Cork Yacht Club upriver
Image: Michael Harpur


With three large fully serviced marinas that may also provide moorings, berths in Crosshaven can generally be considered to be available on demand. It is nevertheless advisable to contact the chosen marina before arrival to make the necessary arrangements. All the marinas use Ch. M, but VHF radio cannot be entirely relied upon in Crosshaven as the surrounding hills tend to block the signal. Hence an advance phone call during working hours is more reliable. If arriving outside normal working hours, typically 09.00 – 21.00 hours during the season, simply come alongside the marina's designated Visitors’ berth and report your arrival as early as possible. All three marina's berths are fully serviced with shore power, water and they can all provide diesel.


Crosshaven Boatyard Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


Crosshaven Boatyard Marina The 100 berth Crosshaven Boatyard Marina is the first of three marinas at Crosshaven. It can accommodate yachts up to 35 metres LOA carrying up to 4 metres draught. The marina may be contacted by Landline+353 (0) 214 831161, VHF Ch M, Websitecrosshavenboatyard.com, E-mailinfo@crosshavenboatyard.com. The yard provides a wide range of mechanical, electronic & engine services plus a limited chandlery.


Salve Marine Crosshaven
Image: Michael Harpur


Salve Marine Crosshaven Situated 300 metres upriver northwest and just beyond town quay Salve Marine Crosshaven has the most convenient access to the village. The 56 berth marina can accommodate vessels from 8 metres to 50 meters LOA, carrying draughts of up to 4.2 metres. It also has a limited number of swing moorings. The marina may be contacted by Landline+353 (0) 214 831 145, E-mailsalvemarine@eircom.net, VHF M [Salve Marine], working channel 01.


Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina
Image: Michael Harpur


Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina The final marina is Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina that is located a ¼ of a mile above Crosshaven Boatyard and immediately upriver of the Salve Marine. It is reached by passing between the outermost Salve Marina pontoon and the moored craft on the north side of the river. The marina is home to the oldest yacht club in the world. Founded at the Cove of Cork, now Cobh, in 1720 it holds the title of the oldest sailing club in the world and it has had its headquarters in the village since 1966. The Royal Cork Yacht Club is on the forefront of all branches of sailing activity in the area as is no better illustrated by being the organiser of the prestigious biannual Regatta of Cork Week.

The marina has 200 berths fully serviced berths and there are also a host of RCYC moorings available upriver of their pontoons. The marina may be contacted by Landline+353 (0) 21 483 1023, VHF M [Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina], Websitewww.royalcork.com.


How to get in?
The mounded Currabinny headland starting to revealing itself behind Ram's Head
Image: Michael Harpur


Convergance Point Use Ireland’s coastal overviews Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location or Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location as appropriate for seaward approaches. Directions for entry and run up through Cork Harbour are provided in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry. Crosshaven is situated in the Owenboy River that discharges into the west side of Cork's Lower Harbour.


Fort Meagher on Rams Head as seen from The Sound
Image: Mark Murray CC BY-SA 2.0


The northeast-facing river entrance is not readily apparent being obscured behind Ram’s Head and the green undeveloped mounded Currabinny Peninsula that is located on the northern bank of the river closing it in from the east. It only starts to open once Ram's Head has been cleared. The northeastern extremity of the Ram's Head is readily identified by Fort Meagher and a distance of 400 metres off should be maintained when rounding Ram’s Head.


Lateral buoys C1 and C2A to the north of Ram's Head
Image: Michael Harpur


Once north of Ram's Head the approach is made readily apparent by Crosshaven's fairway marks. The first pair of lit lateral buoys are, Starboard C1 Fl.G.10s and Port C2A Fl.R.7·5s, situated in about 2.5 metres of water and at a distance of 250 metres north of Rams Head.


C1A, C2 and C4 buoys leading into the mouth of the River Owenabue
Image: Michael Harpur


Once located they lead to a second pair of lit lateral buoys, Starboard C1A Fl.G.5s and Port C2 Fl.R.5s, on a mean heading of about 250° T. These lead outside a shallow patch called the Ram's Head Bank that extends out north and northwestward from Ram's Head and northwestward from Scotchman's Point, the inner head situated about ½ a mile within Rams Head. It is important to stay in the marked fairway as the bottom shoals rapidly outside the buoyed channel.


The entrance to the Owenboy River
Image: Brian Clayton


Once the C1A and C2 lateral buoys have been passed, the course takes a south-by-southwesterly direction into the river mouth. Crosshaven will become visible as these buoys are passed. The river mouth will be entirely open and Crosshaven, with its church spire making a highly distinctive mark, clearly visible. An Owenboy 6 knot speed limit applies from the C1A and C2 lateral buoys.

The C4 Buoy as seen from Scotchman's Point
Image: Michael Harpur


Continue in to pass a final port buoy C4, Fl.R.10s, situated in the river mouth between Curraghbinny and Scotchman's Point. Shortly beyond it, the Currabinny Pier Breakwater Head is lit by starboard light, Fl.G.5s 4m 4M.


Final approaches to Crosshaven
Image: Michael Harpur


Steer to pass close to the Town Quay, 2F R(Vert), as on the opposite bank to the quay a shallow area extends from the Currabinny Peninsula. This encroaches from the north, or starboard, side of the river and its extremity is marked by the starboard hand Owenboy River C3 buoy, Fl.G.10s.

The River Owenabue to the south of the Currabinny Peninsula
Image: Michael Harpur



Immediately upriver the high density of moored craft, encroaching and narrowing the river fairway opposite the pontoon hammerheads, serve as starboard marks. As these moorings are not lit nor the marinas typically manned before 0900 it is best advised to anchor outside at night.

C3 starboard buoy opposite town quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location Berth as directed with the chosen marina. The helm should be vigilant on final approaches. Tidal streams run strong in the narrow fairway that remains outside the marinas and the dense concentration of boats and moorings severely limit manoeuvrability.


Crosshaven Boatyard Marina the first marina within the entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


Likewise, it is advisable to carefully assess the flow rates of the ebb and flood tides when making a final approach on a berth. Vessels taking moorings should land where they see other yachts' tenders taken ashore.


Salve Marine
Image: Michael Harpur


Short stay berths are possible on the town quay and pontoon if space is available. Vessels can come alongside at the harbour master's discretion. Hugh Coveney Quay has more than 5 metres LAT alongside and is used by fishing boats. A yacht should not be left unattended alongside the quay or pontoon.

Town Quay Pontoon
Image: Michael Harpur



Why visit here?
Crosshaven, original Irish name is 'Bun an Tábhairne' is believed to be a corruption of 'tSabhairne' a grammatical form of the word 'Sabhrann' that is the name of a local river. The Irish word 'Bun' refers to 'river mouth' when in reference to place names. This would give the old Irish name a translation of 'the mouth of the River Sabhrann' which is very fitting.


The pretty village of Crosshaven
Image: Michael Harpur


However, there is also a strong belief that its old Irish word 'tábhairne' is derived from the English word 'tavern'. That the old name could also mean 'the low-land of the tavern' or 'ale-house hollow'. This name might appear just as fitting to many of its visiting sailors coming in to slake a thirst after a hard day's sailing. Whichever the case, the current English name of Crosshaven is believed to have come from the medieval Irish name for the east side of the village that was called Cros tSeáin, 'John's cross'. John's cross, in this case, refers to a Norman castle that was built, most likely by the Fitzgeralds, around Castle Point.


Crosshaven as seen from the eastern shoreline
Image: Michael Harpur


Crosshaven, as experienced today, began as a small fishing village at the mouth of the Owenboy. It was described in Lewis's 1837 'Topographical Dictionary of Ireland', "[Crosshaven] comprises about 100 houses, which are small, but well built; and is one of the eight coast-guard stations in the district of Cobh. In the creek, a vessel may ride in 10 or 12 feet of water. Crosshaven House, the residence of T. Hayes, Esq.; Camden Fort and several handsome villas and lodges, the summer residences of those who visit the coast for sea-bathing, closely adjoin the village. An extensive fishery was formerly carried on, but it has so much declined that only five small vessels remain". Most remarkably, Crosshaven has changed very little over the centuries since. Apart from the impact of leisure sailing, it remains to this day a picturesque village nestled on a hillside overlooking the wooded mound of Currabinny, preserving a wonderful sense of quiet repose.


The beautiful spire of St Bridgids stands prominently over Crosshaven
Image: Michael Harpur


This quiet out of the way demeanour makes Crosshaven an unexpected location to host a touchstone of sailing history, the oldest sailing club in the world. As is noted in the Guinness Book of World Records the Royal Cork Yacht Club (RCYC) holds this title. It was first established on Haulbowline Island in 1720 as the 'Cork Harbour Water Club'. Haulbowline Island was then a bustling Royal Navy base and this tradition continues to this day where it is the HQ of the Irish Naval Service. Even the island’s name, Haulbowline, is derived from a large ship manoeuvre that was required to round it, the order to 'Haul bow lines' was issued prior to a square-rigger going about.


The head of the beautiful wooded Currabinny Peninsula seen across the entrance
Image: Michael Harpur


The original twenty-five members of Cork Harbour Water Club had, however, no concerns for warfare or, indeed, even racing their boats. The club's intentions were more about people who were content to cruise and to enjoy each other's company. It was very active until 1765, but then interest seems to have waned somewhat thereafter. In 1806 another club that had formed nearby in the the Cove of Cork, now Cobh, took on the name of the Cork Harbour Yacht Club. This was later shortened to the Cork Yacht Club and in 1831 King William IV bequeathed the 'Royal' prefix to the club. The club prospered thereafter and a prestigious new Italianate style clubhouse was built for it on Cobh's quayside in 1854. From then on their annual regatta became one of the sporting highlights of the region.


The 1854 Italianate style clubhouse on Cobh's quayside, now the Sirius Centre
Image: © Aidan Fleming


In 1966 the RCYC merged with the Royal Munster Yacht Club and made the Royal Munster's Crosshaven clubhouse its new headquarters. Today the Crosshaven clubhouse may appear less than prepossessing from the outside, especially when compared with the original Cobh building that is now the Sirius Centre and after being restored in 1989 is now a restaurant and maritime exhibition area. But the interior of the Crosshaven building has been meticulously refitted and is truly wonderful. It welcomes visitors to its very good restaurant where the famous RCYC hospitality is enjoyed in equal measure.


RCYC Clubhouse today
Image: Graham Rabbits


It should also be mentioned that the adjacent Crosshaven Boatyard downriver has its place in sailing history. For it was here that Sir Francis Chichester's yacht Gypsy Moth V was built. After his epic 1968 'round the world voyage' Chichester voiced his disdain for the temperamental Gipsy Moth IV by describing it as a 'committee product'.


Depiction of Sir Francis Chichester sailing Gypsy Moth IV
Image: CC0


Appearing not to be sorry to quickly leave it behind he returned to the boating themes that he had been happiest with in the successive Gipsy Moth V: boats designed by Robert Clark built in Ireland. So it was in 1969-70 that he came to Crosshaven Boatyard. Gipsy Moth V was exactly what he wanted, good-mannered and fast and he went on to set a record time for sailing between West Africa and South America in her. Chichester was so pleased with Gipsy Moth V that he kept her until his death and Gipsy Moth V would sadly not outlive him for any length. The next owner was another long-distance solo sailor who took some sleep before making an approach on Sydney in a 'round the world race'. Just after he turned in an inauspicious change of wind occurred that causing Gipsy Moth V to alter course ashore and become a much-lamented total loss.

Tim Severin
Image: Aaron R. Linderman via GFDL
Tim Severin’s St. Brendan was also built here in 1976. It had been theorised that the Latin texts of 'Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis', 'The Voyage of St Brendan the Abbot', dating back to at least 800 AD, detailed the story of how the Irish monk St Brendan's (c. 489–583) had voyage across the Atlantic Ocean to a new land and returned. Severin was convinced that the legend was based in historical truth and he came to Crosshaven Boatyard to build a replica of Brendan's currach in order to prove it. The resulting currach was entirely handcrafted in the boatyard using traditional tools. 11 metres (36-foot) LOA and two-masted the boat was made of Irish ash and oak wrapped with 49 traditionally tanned ox hides that were lashed and sealed with wool grease.

Between May 1976 and June 1977, Severin and his crew sailed the Brendan 4,500 miles from Ireland to Peckford Island, Newfoundland, stopping at the Hebrides, the Faroe Islands and Iceland en route finding all the way the observations that were detailed in the 'Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis'. The boat is now featured at the Craggaunowen open-air museum in County Clare. The boatyard that constructed these very different and nonetheless historic sailing crafts is still run by the same family.


Close competition in Cork Week racing
Image: Tourism Ireland


The Royal Cork Yacht Club (RCYC) has not only made Crosshaven world-famous for the sailing legacy it represents but it has also contributed to making it a venue for world-class championship sailing events. The most significant amongst these is the biannual Regatta of Cork Week, held in July on alternate (even-numbered) years. Formerly known as Ford Cork Week due to the sponsorship of the Ford Motor Company, this has become an internationally famous sailing success. The first Cork Week took place off Cork Harbour in 1978 with 50 boats. From this small beginning the event prospered, largely as a result of the voluntary enthusiasm of club members, and now attracts up to 10,000 competitors and spectators. The secret of Cork Week’s success is attributed to its eclectic mix of classes, competitors, good courses, good company, the team of dedicated volunteers, and the inclination for fun and goodwill of its participants. It is today rated as one of the most enjoyable regattas in the world.


Crosshaven as seen from the road leading to Forth Meagher (Camden)
Image: Michael Harpur


Outside of Cork Week, the village of Crosshaven remains a very attractive sailing destination as a result of its resources and natural beauty. There are four colour-coded walking routes in the immediate locality. They scarcely stray far from the village and yet incorporate beautiful views and historical landmarks. For those prepared to strike out further afield, there is a network of roads that lead from the village to a series of small bays, rocky coves and quiet sandy beaches with bathing nooks and fine coastal scenery. All offer beautiful walks with sea, river and land views. Myrtleville, which has a particularly family-friendly sandy beach, scenic Church Bay at Weaver's Point, Fennell's Bay and Fountainstown are all well worth visiting. Most of these are reasonably close but can be subject to steep hills that make for a challenging walk or cycle.


The view from Fort Camden to Fort Carlisle when it was operated by the British Forces
Image: National Library of Ireland on The Commons


A highly rewarding walk is up to Fort Meagher, that although renamed is still referred to by some as Fort Camden, that is seen when entering the harbour. Fort Meagher corresponds with Fort Davis, formerly Fort Carlisle, on the other side of the entrance that was one of the earliest bastioned forts in the country. Both these impressive structures are internationally recognised as some of the world's finest examples of classical coastal artillery forts. The Fort Meagher site was built over the Norman castle and the structure that dates from about 1550 had the reputation during the whole of Elizabeth's reign of being impregnable. They were further added-to in 1600 but, after the Battle of Kinsale, the forts became derelict.


Fort Meagher (Camden) granite spiral stair leading to the magazine
Image: Kieran Sheehan via CC ASA 4.0


At the end of the 17th-century, the fort was fortified by the Jacobites in an effort to block the Williamites' naval forces. In 1690 it fired on the Williamite fleet as it entered Cork Harbour, but was silenced by a party sent ashore to attack it. It was then known as James' Battery and consisted of two blockhouses and eight guns. Most of its developments occurred when Cork Harbour became a naval base for the Royal Navy after the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The corresponding forts were then subsequently significantly strengthened after the arrival of the French fleet into Bantry Bay in 1796. During the 1860s the Forts were redeveloped along the lines of other 'Palmerston Forts' in the region.


Fort Meagher (Camden) site range over Cork Harbour's entrance
Image: Kieran Sheehan via CC ASA 4.0


Following the establishment of the Irish Free State, three deepwater Treaty Ports at Cork Harbour (Queenstown), Berehaven and Lough Swilly were retained by the United Kingdom in accordance with the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. The main reason for the retention of the ports was the U-boat Campaign around Irish coasts during World War I and the concern of the British government that it might recur. The forts were handed over to the Irish Defence Forces in 1938, and Fort Camden was also renamed Fort Meagher in memory of the Irish nationalist Thomas Francis Meagher who was the leader of the Young Irelanders in the Rebellion of 1848.


View over Cork's Lower Harbour from Fort Meagher
Image: Derekjmc via CC BY-SA 4.0


In 1989 Cork County Council acquired ownership and there are plans for Fort Camden to include a Military Heritage Centre and general tourist attractions, including accommodation, craft shops and a restaurant. The walk up to Fort Meagher is worth it for the spectacular panorama it offers across the lower harbour and its approaches. The view ranges from the striking spire of St Colman's Cathedral in Cobh to the refinery at Whitegate.

Crosshaven river moorings at sunrise
Image: Cnolan via CC0


From a boating perspective, Crosshaven has it all. A location that just about anything a boat requires can be catered for here. It offers perfect protection with wonderful scenery and plenty of pubs, restaurants and takeaways to suit even the most discerning of tastes. Likewise, Cork City is just 12 miles away.


What facilities are available?
Each and every boating requirement can be found in Crosshaven. The village has most anything required and Cork City is just 12 miles away.


With thanks to:
Anthony McCarthy, local yachtsman.







Aerial views of Crosshaven




Brendan Voyage



Sir Francis Chichester sails the Gypsy Moth 1967



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