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Cork City Marina

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Overview





Situated on the south coast of Ireland, deep within Cork’s extensive natural harbour, Cork City Marina is a convenient pontoon berth that specifically welcomes leisure craft into the heart of this historic and nationally important city.

Situated on the south coast of Ireland, deep within Cork’s extensive natural harbour, Cork City Marina is a convenient pontoon berth that specifically welcomes leisure craft into the heart of this historic and nationally important city.

Being both inside the harbour and then several miles up-river the marina offers complete protection from all conditions. Safe access is assured in all reasonable conditions by Cork Harbour, one of the most easily approached, well-marked and safest natural harbours in the world.
Please note

The run-up to the City Quays is a trek of about fifteen miles from the entrance. The narrows at the upper end of the entrance can be unexpectedly rough when strong southerly conditions meet an ebb tide. Although very well marked for night navigation, owing to Cobh’s lights and the vast amount of markers in the lower harbour area, first-time visitors should prefer a day entry as it may prove challenging at night.




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Keyfacts for Cork City Marina



Last modified
May 22nd 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableExtensive shopping available in the areaLaundry facilities availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaInternet café in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaChandlery available in the areaTrolley or cart available for unloading and loadingMarine engineering services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometresBicycle hire available in the areaCar hire available in the areaTourist Information office availableShore based family recreation in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesUrban nature,  anything from a small town of more 5,000 inhabitants  to a large cityScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: could be two hours or more from the main waterwaysNote: harbour fees may be charged



HM  +353 21 4273125      info@portofcork.ie      Ch.12, 14 &16
Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 53.924' N, 008° 27.745' W

The position of the pontoon alongside the Custom House Quay.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cork City Marina for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Glenbrook - 3.3 miles ESE
  2. Cork Harbour Marina - 3.6 miles ESE
  3. Cobh - 4.2 miles ESE
  4. Spike Island - 4.5 miles ESE
  5. Drake’s Pool - 4.6 miles SE
  6. Cuskinny - 4.8 miles ESE
  7. Crosshaven - 5.1 miles SE
  8. East Ferry Marina - 5.9 miles ESE
  9. White Bay - 6 miles SE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 6 miles E
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Glenbrook - 3.3 miles ESE
  2. Cork Harbour Marina - 3.6 miles ESE
  3. Cobh - 4.2 miles ESE
  4. Spike Island - 4.5 miles ESE
  5. Drake’s Pool - 4.6 miles SE
  6. Cuskinny - 4.8 miles ESE
  7. Crosshaven - 5.1 miles SE
  8. East Ferry Marina - 5.9 miles ESE
  9. White Bay - 6 miles SE
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 6 miles E
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

Resources search



How to get in?
Port of Cork, Cork City Marina
Image: William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Cork City Marina is located at the South Custom House Quay in the heart of Cork City. The marina has a total of 150 metres of berthage available and is divided between 50 metres of inside and 100 metres of outside berthage. The inside berths can cater for vessels of up to 2.5 metres draft, the outside berths are suitable for larger craft with a draft of up to 4.0 metres. The intention of the marina is to provide a City facility to be used by visitor craft on day trips or for short-term stays.
Please note

The maximum length of stay for any craft is six nights and any extension to this must be approved by the Harbour Master.



Owners wishing to stay overnight at Cork City Marina should make berthing arrangements with the Port Operations Office in advance by contacting the senior berthing master at +353 21 4273125 from 0900 – 1700 Monday to Friday. Outside of these hours, contact should be made with the Tivoli Security Centre at +353 21 4530466.

Cork Sea Buoy with the Cork Harbour entrance five miles northward
Image: Burke Corbett


Convergance Point Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Cork Harbour’s entrance is deep, sheltered, ¾ of a mile wide and highly visible upon approach. The first mark will be the Cork Sea Buoy that is situated five miles south of the entrance.

Cork Sea Buoy – LFl 10s position: 51°42.935'N, 008°15.601'W


The entrance to Cork Harbour as seen from the northeast
Image: © Paul O'Flynn


Initial fix location The harbours principal features that first present themselves from the initial fix are the high bluffs of Dogsnose on the east side of the entrance, plus Ram’s Head, situated about 0.6 of a mile north of Weaver’s Point, on the entrance’s western side. On the summit of the Dogsnose, Fort Davis, previously called Fort Carlisle, will be seen with its notable enclosing double wall immediately to its east, running down the face of the hill to the sea. On the opposite side of the harbour entrance Fort Meagher, previously named Fort Camden, will also be seen facing Fort Davis from the summit of Ram’s Head. One mile south-southwest of Fort Meagher the ruined Templebreedy Abbey, with a spire, stands out conspicuously on high land plus a notable water tower with radio mast will also be seen close north of the Abbey.

Roches Point and the Calf and Cow Rock
Image: Chris Murray via CC BY-SA 2.0


On a closer approach, Roche’s Point’s distinctive white Roche’s Point Lighthouse and sectored light will be seen on the eastern side. A disused signal tower and Roche’s Tower, standing about 410 meters to the east, also come into view.

Roche’s Point - Fl WR 3s position: 51° 47.586'N, 008° 15.287'W

Roche’s Point light sectors are as follows: (Red. Vis.) Red shore-292°. White 292°-016° (84°).Red 016°-033° (17°). White (unintensified) 033°-159° (126°). Red 159°- shore.

At this time Weaver’s Point, on the western shore, will be discernible with 50 metres of high ground standing behind it. The surrounding land on each side of the entrance is relatively low. Once all these points come into view the entrance to the harbour that is situated 0.8 of a mile south of the forts, between Roche’s Point and Weaver’s Point, will be apparent.

Roches Point as seen from The Sound with port hand W4 and North Cardinal E4 in
foreground

Image: John Hughes


Entry to Cork Harbour is straightforward in any weather, on any tide, night or day as there are no particular dangers for leisure craft. Simply pass between Roche's Point and Weaver’s Point, taking the western or eastern shipping approach channels. These channels are marked for the benefit of large ships to assist them pass a central shallow area called Harbour Rock that lies in the middle of the entrance. Once past this area take a mid-channel route up the entrance and between the two forts into the lower harbour. From there it is just a matter of following the markers through the lower harbour to the River Lee via the west side of Great Island to get to the city Quays where the Marina can be found.


Roches Point with a ripple over the covered Calf Rock
Image: John Finn


However, it could not be said that the harbour has no dangers. The east side of the entrance has a pair of important rocks that vessels approaching the entrance from this side, particularly at high water, should make particular note of. These are the Cow Rock and Calf Rock that are situated beneath Roche’s Point and the rocks extend out about 200 metres to the south of the lighthouse. The conning-tower-like shape of the inner Cow Rock always shows but not so the outer Calf Rock. This is the real danger here as it is the outer of the two rocks and it covers; only drying to 1.4 metres at LWS. As such it is critically important not to cut into the entrance when approaching from the east as this runs the danger of colliding with Calf Rock. Although very difficult to pick out, the alignment 329.5° T of Christ Church spire, 4 miles within the harbour at Rushbrooke, and the eastern extremity of Fort Meagher on Ram's Head, as best seen on Admiralty Chart 1777, lead clear of Cow and Calf Rocks.


The view over Fort Davis to Fort Meagher
Image: AirCam Ireland


Likewise if entering Cork Harbour during strong southerly conditions over an ebb tide the area between Fort Meagher and Fort Davis, approximately 1 mile in from the harbour entrance, can get surprisingly rough. The channel narrows here to half a nautical mile concentrating the run of the ebb and heightening a wind on tide condition.


Roche’s Point with the entrance to the harbour opening behind
Image: Giuseppe Castrogiovanni


On rounding Roche’s Point the entrance to the harbour opens, and the three buoys marking Harbour Rock, a port, a starboard, and a north cardinal plus the corresponding marks off the eastern and western shorelines all come into view. These mark the approach channels that exist on either side of the Harbour Rock that lies in the middle of the entrance, just within Roche’s Point.

Harbour Rock is an extensive rocky shoal with depths varying between 10.7 to 4.4 metres, with the shallowest part being a rocky pinnacle near its northeast elbow. Although nearly in the middle of the entrance, and much in the way of large ships working in or out of the harbour, in reasonable conditions the shallow area that is Harbour Rock presents no obstacle to leisure craft. But in extreme southerly conditions, the sea can break on the rock on a low water spring tide. At such times the deep clear passages on either side should be used. These are supported by leading lights and light buoys.

Beyond Harbour Rock, taking a central channel approach up The Sound, the next marks are similarly targeted at assisting commercial shipping. Most of the dangers marked have more than five metres of cover with plenty of depth close to the mark.


The lower harbour within the entrance as seen with Spike Island in the
foreground

Image: Tourism Ireland


On passing the entrance, the lower harbour at once unfolds. This has the separate ports of Cork, Cobh, Whitegate and Ringaskiddy within its confines and its principal features are Spike Island, Haulbowline Island, and the town of Cove. A comparatively small part of the wide expanse that presents itself is available for navigation. The greater part of it being occupied by shallows, between which the deep water channel runs in a northeast by north direction, for about 2 miles, to the shores of Great Island, where the path bends abruptly to the west, until it meets the River Lee a little above Haulbowline Island, when it again resumes its northerly direction.

Progressing out from the north end of The Sound into this expanse of water, between Ram Head’s Fort Meagher and the corresponding Fort Davis on the opposite shore, a set of port and starboard markers will be seen on the port side to the north of Ram’s Head. Situated in about 2.5 metres of water and a distance of 250 metres north of Ram’s Head these serve to mark the entrance to the Owenboy River, that opens up to port, leading to Crosshaven.


Spit Bank Light
Image: MrDmhiston


Within the harbour, the Fairway is well marked with its western banks defined by port buoys, with even numbers, and the eastern bank by starboard markers with odd numbers. Follow the fairway over The Bar about 2.75 miles north, being guided by the numbered light buoys on each side of the channel. To the south of Spike Island the western bank is steep-to, but from abreast of the island to the north, a flat extends from the western bank to the south of the Spit Bank Light and it is advised to keep well off the Spit Bank.

Spit Bank Light – WR 4s 10m 10/7M position 51°50.720’N, 008°16'.452’W


Cobh town as seen from Cobh Road
Image: Tourism Ireland


The channel then departs the Fairway turning hard to port around the north side of the Spit Mark. Here it takes a west-southwest direction along Cobh Road that is situated along the south side of Great Island. From north of the Spit Bank align on the port-hand marker buoy No. 20, then steer towards starboard hand mark No 15 off White Point opposite Haulbowline Island.
Please note

It is advisable at this stage to contact Cork Harbour Radio on VHF Channel 12. Make them aware of your passage plan and take advice regarding any ship movements that may be encountered.



Boats passing between White Point and Haulbowline Island
Image: MrDmhiston


This leg, a distance of about two miles, passes north of Haulbowline Island, with its naval vessels, and onward toward the Ringaskiddy Ferry Port.


Cork Docks and the West Passage
Image: MrDmhiston


Here it turns abruptly to starboard progressing northward for about two miles where the industrial dockyards of the harbour will be first seen. This leg passes through the West Passage of Great Island to Marino Point situated at the east side end of Lough Mahon. Keep vigilant in this area and well clear of the southwest corner of Great Island. Be aware of a frequent, rapid ferry service that crosses the West Passage immediately north of the narrows.
Please note

The tides are at their strongest in the area between Ringaskiddy Ferry Port and the narrows of the West Passage where up to 3 knots can be attained at times.



Fast ferry service crossing the West Passage
Image: AirCam Ireland


From the northwest corner of Great Island the path turns to the northwest for 3.5 miles through Lough Mahon, marked on each side by numbered light buoys and with a maintained depth of 6.5 metres, to the Tivoli Container Terminal. From here the River Lee turns northwest to Cork City docks, a distance of just over a mile, where the channel then narrows between the highly industrialised river banks. The river has a maintained depth of 5.2 metres.


Cork City docks leading to Cork City
Image: Bigchrome


Here the City of Cork will be seen situated on both sides of the river about fifteen miles above the entrance. Follow the commercial Quays until they divide at Custom House Quay where a conspicuous ‘Port of Cork' sign will be seen in front of its tastefully restored Victorian Office. The pontoon will be conspicuous on the south side of the divide before Eamon De Valera Bridge on the Custom House Quay.

Port of Cork sign on Custom House Quay
Image: William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Haven location The City Marina offers a total of 150 metres of pontoon space for leisure craft and is reserved exclusively for recreational purposes.

Cork City Marina on Custom House Quay
Image: William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


The inside berths are suitable for craft with a draft of up to 2.5 metres, the outside berth, with 100 metres of berthage, is suitable for larger craft with a draft of up to 4.0 metres. During busy periods, double banking may be necessary and the person in charge of the alongside craft will be expected to co-operate with the rafting.
Please note

The docks are reserved for industrial use only. Custom House Quay is the only leisure berth possibility along the run from West Passage. Speed is restricted to 6 knots throughout the harbour and smaller vessels should give way to large vessels that are restricted by draft to the marked navigation channels.




Why visit here?
Cork derives its name from the Irish description Corcach Mór Mumhan that translates to ‘The Great Marsh of Munster’. This was shortened in time to Corcaigh and then anglicised to ‘Cork’.

The city’s origins date back to the 6th-century when it was a monastic settlement founded by Saint Finbarr. Cork took on its urban character at some point between 915 and 922 when the invading Norseman, or Vikings, began to settle. They built a trading port here that became part of a coastal chain of important trade centres, along with Dublin, Wexford, and Waterford, in what was then a Europe-wide Scandinavian trade network. These, in turn, were then taken over by the Anglo-Normans, and Prince John granted the city its charter in 1185.


During this time the city grew steadily. The original core of the city was built on a marshy island that was created by a divide in the River Lee. The early town huddled between the river's northern and southern channels, bisected by yet another, and was very marshy with streets that were more like canals. The waterways between the islands were then built over to form some of the main streets of the present-day city. In time the town was fully walled with castellated watch-towers. Early maps show ships below the walls and some sections of these walls and gates remain today. The city then grew in fits and starts, extending in times of abundance and halting in poorer times. By the 19th-century Cork was a flourishing sea-port with walled quays constructed along the river as far as their junction, and a handsome custom house built overlooking the harbour.


Cork City Hall
Image: Tourism Ireland


During much of this development and through the majority of the Middle Ages, the culture of Cork City was that of an Old English enclave. Although hosting a population of about two thousand the city's municipal government was dominated by little more than a dozen merchant families. Their wealth came from trade with continental Europe that comprised of the export of wool and hides and the import of salt, iron and wine. This tightly-knit cultural and trading outpost was surrounded by a predominantly hostile Gaelic countryside. Cut off from the nearest English government stronghold, that was enclosed within the Pale around Dublin, the surrounding Gaelic and Hiberno-Norman lords extorted "black rent" from the city citizens in order to keep them from attacking the city. This continued to be the case for several centuries and a description of Cork in 1577 describes it as, "the fourth city of Ireland" that is "so encumbered with evil neighbours, the Irish outlaws, that they are fayne to watch their gates hourly ... they trust not the country adjoining [and only marry within the town] so that the whole city is linked to each other in affinity".


The centuries of sequestration and entwining bloodlines has provided Cork City with a very strong sense of identity. One of the ancient names for Cork harbour is Bealach Coullach, ‘way of the tribes’, which indicates it to be a city that is strong of its own mind and purpose. This has been a reoccurring historical hallmark of the city and its denizens to the present day. Cork earned its nickname, "the rebel city", as a result of its ill-fated support of the Yorkist cause during the War of the Roses.


It carried this nature into the twentieth century in the War of Independence where the centre of Cork was gutted by fires started by the British Black and Tans in the battle for independence where some of the fiercest fighting between Irish guerrillas and UK forces took place. Likewise, in the immediate aftermath of the Irish Civil War, Cork was for a time held by anti-Treaty forces, until it was retaken by the pro-Treaty National Army in an attack from the sea. As a result of this stand the people of Cork refer to the city as "the real capital". This unique sense of city and fraternity continues today where young, proud Corkonians generally view themselves as different to the rest of Ireland, and refer to themselves as living in "the people’s republic of Cork. Many capitals and second cities, such as London and Manchester, Sydney and Melbourne or Madrid and Barcelona, have a sense of rivalry but the rivalry between Cork and Dublin is palpable and pronounced.


Today the city has grown from its trading merchant city roots to a cosmopolitan vibrant 21st-century city. It is home to 123,000 people that make it the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and the third most populous city on the island of Ireland. Cork Harbour is one of the most important industrial areas in Ireland. While many older industries such as shipbuilding, steel-making and fertiliser manufacturing have declined or ceased in recent years, they have been replaced with newer industries most notably the pharmaceutical industry. In this area, Cork is hugely significant at a worldwide level with 8 out of 10 of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies having a home here and in excess of 100 other pharmaceutical firms operating in the Cork Harbour area. These all bring significant employment and wealth to the region.


Specifically set up to bring visiting leisure craft into the heart of this city, Cork City Marina embodies the Latin motto on the cities coat of arms Statio Bene Fida Carinis; "A safe harbour for ships". Plus, being situated in the cradle of the city, just 500 metres from the city's central Patrick Street, the marina offers a unique opportunity to embrace this special city.


The friendly, vibrant port city has a host of attractions that can scarcely be touched upon in a short introduction. Some key attractions to make note of are the tower of St Ann's church at Shandon for views across the city. The Old Butter Exchange, active for over 150 years with buyers worldwide, is well worth a visit. The Cork Public Museum and Cork City Gaol with waxwork figures depicting the warders and prisoners from the 19th century will be of interest to historians. The Crawford Art Gallery in Emmet's Place is housed in the original Cork Custom House building and there is plenty more.


Cork City at night
Image: Tourism Ireland


Clearly, a visit here will require planning to get the most out of the city and we recommend the first visit should be to the Cork City Tourist Information Centre on Grand Parade. Here visitors will find a wide range of activities that will easily overwhelm the pontoon’s maximum stay of six nights.


What facilities are available?
Cork Harbour is a major yachting centre for Ireland and as such you can get everything you need, if not at the city centre marina, certainly in the harbour area. Water, electricity and refuse facilities are available on all pontoons. Within 100 metres of the Port of Cork City Marina is The Clarion Hotel that at the time of writing, 2012, offers overnight marina users the use of its shower and leisure facilities for €5 and also a breakfast promotion. All that is required is the marina payment receipt to be presented at the hotel.

Being Ireland’s second largest city Cork has excellent transport connections. Iarnrod Eireann, Ireland's national train company operates from Cork's Kent Train station and is located on the Lower Glanmire Road, north of the River Lee. Less than 10 minutes’ walk from it is the city bus station. Bus Eireann provides a regular national service including an Air Coach bus service from Cork's Parnell Place Bus Station to Cork Airport throughout the week. Cork Airport is conveniently located just 8 kilometres from Cork City Centre.


Any security concerns?
The marina has secured gates, 24hr security and the area is covered by CCTV. It lies within the area covered by the International Ship and Port Security Code and all directions issued by the security staff or harbour staff must be complied with in this area.


With thanks to:
Gareth Thomas, Yacht Jalfrezi and Brian Berry. Photographs with thanks to ‘The Quays Bar & Restaurant’ shotspoof, John Glynn, Chris Murray, Seek New Travel, derekmenzies, Cork City Council, KlausFoehl, Philip Halling, Padra Martin and Gordon Kinsella.


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Port of Cork, Cork City Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Cork City Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks William Murphy via CC BY-SA 2.0


Cork City Marina
Image: eOceanic thanks branislaw




Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (i)




Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (ii)




Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (iii)


About Cork City Marina

Cork derives its name from the Irish description Corcach Mór Mumhan that translates to ‘The Great Marsh of Munster’. This was shortened in time to Corcaigh and then anglicised to ‘Cork’.

The city’s origins date back to the 6th-century when it was a monastic settlement founded by Saint Finbarr. Cork took on its urban character at some point between 915 and 922 when the invading Norseman, or Vikings, began to settle. They built a trading port here that became part of a coastal chain of important trade centres, along with Dublin, Wexford, and Waterford, in what was then a Europe-wide Scandinavian trade network. These, in turn, were then taken over by the Anglo-Normans, and Prince John granted the city its charter in 1185.


During this time the city grew steadily. The original core of the city was built on a marshy island that was created by a divide in the River Lee. The early town huddled between the river's northern and southern channels, bisected by yet another, and was very marshy with streets that were more like canals. The waterways between the islands were then built over to form some of the main streets of the present-day city. In time the town was fully walled with castellated watch-towers. Early maps show ships below the walls and some sections of these walls and gates remain today. The city then grew in fits and starts, extending in times of abundance and halting in poorer times. By the 19th-century Cork was a flourishing sea-port with walled quays constructed along the river as far as their junction, and a handsome custom house built overlooking the harbour.


Cork City Hall
Image: Tourism Ireland


During much of this development and through the majority of the Middle Ages, the culture of Cork City was that of an Old English enclave. Although hosting a population of about two thousand the city's municipal government was dominated by little more than a dozen merchant families. Their wealth came from trade with continental Europe that comprised of the export of wool and hides and the import of salt, iron and wine. This tightly-knit cultural and trading outpost was surrounded by a predominantly hostile Gaelic countryside. Cut off from the nearest English government stronghold, that was enclosed within the Pale around Dublin, the surrounding Gaelic and Hiberno-Norman lords extorted "black rent" from the city citizens in order to keep them from attacking the city. This continued to be the case for several centuries and a description of Cork in 1577 describes it as, "the fourth city of Ireland" that is "so encumbered with evil neighbours, the Irish outlaws, that they are fayne to watch their gates hourly ... they trust not the country adjoining [and only marry within the town] so that the whole city is linked to each other in affinity".


The centuries of sequestration and entwining bloodlines has provided Cork City with a very strong sense of identity. One of the ancient names for Cork harbour is Bealach Coullach, ‘way of the tribes’, which indicates it to be a city that is strong of its own mind and purpose. This has been a reoccurring historical hallmark of the city and its denizens to the present day. Cork earned its nickname, "the rebel city", as a result of its ill-fated support of the Yorkist cause during the War of the Roses.


It carried this nature into the twentieth century in the War of Independence where the centre of Cork was gutted by fires started by the British Black and Tans in the battle for independence where some of the fiercest fighting between Irish guerrillas and UK forces took place. Likewise, in the immediate aftermath of the Irish Civil War, Cork was for a time held by anti-Treaty forces, until it was retaken by the pro-Treaty National Army in an attack from the sea. As a result of this stand the people of Cork refer to the city as "the real capital". This unique sense of city and fraternity continues today where young, proud Corkonians generally view themselves as different to the rest of Ireland, and refer to themselves as living in "the people’s republic of Cork. Many capitals and second cities, such as London and Manchester, Sydney and Melbourne or Madrid and Barcelona, have a sense of rivalry but the rivalry between Cork and Dublin is palpable and pronounced.


Today the city has grown from its trading merchant city roots to a cosmopolitan vibrant 21st-century city. It is home to 123,000 people that make it the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and the third most populous city on the island of Ireland. Cork Harbour is one of the most important industrial areas in Ireland. While many older industries such as shipbuilding, steel-making and fertiliser manufacturing have declined or ceased in recent years, they have been replaced with newer industries most notably the pharmaceutical industry. In this area, Cork is hugely significant at a worldwide level with 8 out of 10 of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies having a home here and in excess of 100 other pharmaceutical firms operating in the Cork Harbour area. These all bring significant employment and wealth to the region.


Specifically set up to bring visiting leisure craft into the heart of this city, Cork City Marina embodies the Latin motto on the cities coat of arms Statio Bene Fida Carinis; "A safe harbour for ships". Plus, being situated in the cradle of the city, just 500 metres from the city's central Patrick Street, the marina offers a unique opportunity to embrace this special city.


The friendly, vibrant port city has a host of attractions that can scarcely be touched upon in a short introduction. Some key attractions to make note of are the tower of St Ann's church at Shandon for views across the city. The Old Butter Exchange, active for over 150 years with buyers worldwide, is well worth a visit. The Cork Public Museum and Cork City Gaol with waxwork figures depicting the warders and prisoners from the 19th century will be of interest to historians. The Crawford Art Gallery in Emmet's Place is housed in the original Cork Custom House building and there is plenty more.


Cork City at night
Image: Tourism Ireland


Clearly, a visit here will require planning to get the most out of the city and we recommend the first visit should be to the Cork City Tourist Information Centre on Grand Parade. Here visitors will find a wide range of activities that will easily overwhelm the pontoon’s maximum stay of six nights.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Glenbrook - 3.3 miles ESE
Cork Harbour Marina - 3.6 miles ESE
Spike Island - 4.5 miles ESE
Drake’s Pool - 4.6 miles SE
Crosshaven - 5.1 miles SE
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Cobh - 4.2 miles ESE
Cuskinny - 4.8 miles ESE
East Ferry Marina - 5.9 miles ESE
Northeast of Great Island - 6 miles E
Aghada - 6.1 miles ESE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Cork City Marina.




















































Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (i)




Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (ii)




Aerial overview of Cork Harbour (iii)



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