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Cork Harbour Marina

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Overview





Cork Harbour Marina is situated on the south coast of Ireland within Cork’s extensive natural harbour. It is located on the western shoreline of the River Lee, opposite the docks on Great Island, where it offers a marina set at the foot of the small town of Monkstown.

Situated in the upper reaches of Cork’s Lower Harbour, and in a sheltered part of the river, the marina offers complete protection. Safe access is assured in all reasonable conditions by Cork Harbour, one of the most easily approached, well-marked and safest natural harbours in the world.



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Keyfacts for Cork Harbour Marina
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require considerationNote: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
3 metres (9.84 feet).

Approaches
5 stars: Safe access; all reasonable conditions.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
July 13th 2020

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWaste disposal bins availableDiesel fuel available alongsideGas availableShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableShore power available alongsideShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationScrubbing posts or a place where a vessel can dry out for a scrub below the waterlineMarine engineering services available in the areaSail making or sail repair servicesBus service available in the area


Nature
Marina or pontoon berthing facilitiesBerth alongside a deep water pier or raft up to other vesselsNavigation lights to support a night approachSailing Club baseSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: strong tides or currents in the area that require considerationNote: harbour fees may be charged



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 50.680' N, 008° 19.950' W

This is the position of the entrance to the marina off the western bank of the River Lee (currently not showing on goggle earth image).

What is the initial fix?

The following Cork Harbour initial will set up a final approach:
51° 46.580' N, 008° 15.460' W
This waypoint is a mile out from the entrance and near the Outflow Marker Fl(Y) 20s. It is set on the alignment of 354° (T) of the Dogsnose leading lights that are situated on the east side of Cork Harbour entrance. This waypoint sets up an east channel approach but a vessel may alter course to and enter via the west channel.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s coastal overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s coastal overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. Use the directions provided for Cork City Marina Click to view haven for the entry and run up through Cork Harbour.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Cork Harbour Marina for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Glenbrook - 0.6 miles N
  2. Cobh - 0.8 miles E
  3. Spike Island - 1 miles ESE
  4. Drake’s Pool - 1.5 miles S
  5. Cuskinny - 1.6 miles ENE
  6. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles SSE
  7. White Bay - 2.4 miles SE
  8. Aghada - 2.8 miles E
  9. Ringabella Bay - 2.9 miles SSE
  10. East Ferry Marina - 2.9 miles ENE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Glenbrook - 0.6 miles N
  2. Cobh - 0.8 miles E
  3. Spike Island - 1 miles ESE
  4. Drake’s Pool - 1.5 miles S
  5. Cuskinny - 1.6 miles ENE
  6. Crosshaven - 1.6 miles SSE
  7. White Bay - 2.4 miles SE
  8. Aghada - 2.8 miles E
  9. Ringabella Bay - 2.9 miles SSE
  10. East Ferry Marina - 2.9 miles ENE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Cork Harbour Marina set at the foot of Monkstown
Image: James O'Brien Marina Manager


Cork Harbour Marina is set in a sheltered recess at the heart of Cork Harbour. It is located at the foot of the picturesque Victorian village of Monkstown on the opposite shore to Cork Dockyard on the estuary of the River Lee. The village lies 14 kilometres southeast of Cork City and has a population of approximately 1,000 residents.


Cork Harbour Marina
Image: James O'Brien Marina Manager


The marina carries at least 10 visitor berths and, being at the foot of the West Passage, it has the benefit of deep water all the way from the entrance with a minimum approach depth 7.6m MLWS. Depths in the visitor berths are up to 6 metres and it can accommodate vessels of up to 17 metres LOA and they publish their rate card online External link. The marina can be contacted in advance on Mobile+353 (0) 87 366 9009, E-mailinfo@corkharbourmarina.ie, Websitecorkharbourmarina.ie.


How to get in?
Cork Harbour Marina opposite the docks on Great Island
Image: Jonathan Thacker via CC BY SA 2.0


Convergance Point The run up the Lower Harbour to Cobh Road is best described in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry. Once Haulbowline Island is astern the route abruptly turns to starboard progressing to the north around Great Island’s southwest corner. The industrial Cork Dockyard will be seen opposite Ringaskiddy ferry port on the southern shore.


The Dockyard on Great Island opposite the marina
Image: cotitoo via CC BY SA 2.0


Then situated on the western bank of the River Lee opposite the Cork Dockyard, the marina will be clearly visible. It is situated to the south of the narrows between Great Island and the mainland. The marina consists of an outer perimeter of floating concrete breakwaters with a series of fingered berths within.
Please note

The tides are at their strongest in the area between Ringaskiddy ferry port and the narrows of the West Passage where up to 3 knots can be attained at times. Keep vigilant in this area and well clear of the southwest corner of Great Island.




Cork Harbour Marina Pontoon Plan
Image: James O'Brien Marina Manager


Haven location Berth as directed by the marina office.


Why visit here?
Monkstown, in Irish 'Baile an Mhanaigh' anglicised as 'Ballinvannegh' meaning 'the town of the monk', derives its name from an early small monastic site that was believed to have existed close to Monkstown Castle. It was recorded that... The Benedictine House of Leagan [Monkstown] was founded by King John (1167 to 1216) on condition that the priory of Saint John's, Waterford, finding four chaplains to perform Divine Service in Cork for the souls of the Kings ancestor's and finding 12 beds for poor people and sustenance for two brethern and two sisters there forever.' It is believed that King John's monastery was built on the site of an old Irish monastic settlement that once had a round tower.


The view over Cork Harbour Monkstown in 1849
Image: Public Domain


All traces of this have been lost to time and it is the old castle that now dominates the old road on the high side of the Monkstown Glen, for which the town is perhaps most noted for. Monkstown Castle is an Elizabethan style fortified tower house. It was constructed around 1636 by Anastasia Archdeacon (née Gould) as a surprise gift for her husband John Archdeacon. At the time he was fighting overseas as an officer in the wars of King Philip of Spain. Legend has it that Anastasia was more than thrifty in her project. She hired construction workers from outside the Monkstown area and housed them in specially built site accommodation which they rented from her, and bought food and clothing from her on-site outlets; at a price. Once the workers had paid their rent and settled up their bills, it is said that the overall cost of the castle worked out at about fourpence.


Monkstown Castle during Victorian Times
Image: National Library of Ireland on The Commons


A further implausible, but nonetheless entertaining, Archdeacon legend has it that when John's ship finally returned from the wars to Monkstown Bay he immediately ordered the guns to set fire upon the castle. The story is that he was so taken back by his surprise gift on the hill overlooking the bay that he believed the new castle was a fortified house of a newly entrenched enemy. Whatever the case; John Archdeacon was not set to retain control of the castle. Towards the end of the 17th-century, he became involved with some of the leaders of the Catholic Association and fell into disfavour with King Charles II. The king dispossessed him of his lands and the castle was taken over by the Commonwealth. The Archdeacons later returned to the castle as tenants and are buried close by in its now overgrown graveyard.

Monkstown Castle went on to be actively used throughout the centuries. During the 18th and early 19th-centuries, Monkstown's waterfront served as one of the main military embarkation and disembarkation points in Cork Harbour. Soldiers coming from Cork would march through Rochestown and through Rathanker to Monkstown, followed by their lamenting relations. The sorrowing families were stopped by a barricade of armed soldiers at the bridge at the top of the Glen Road. This bridge has since been known as Hullabaloo Bridge. Throughout this period the castle was used as barracks that accommodated up to 450 soldiers.

Monkstown's Royal Victoria baths
Image: Public Domain
At the start of the 19th-century, a harbour area ferry service commenced and the improved accessibility to Cork City increased Monkstown’s popularity as a holiday resort. Soon development commenced and a row of beautiful Elizabethan style marine villas was constructed close to the shore. These were used as bathing lodges by well-to-do Cork families. In 1838, new Turkish bath leisure and health establishment was developed on the riverside of the Glenbrook to Monkstown road. Marketed as the Royal Victoria Monkstown and Passage West Baths, they became very fashionable. Gardens and a promenade were developed at the Baths in the 1840s and fireworks displays were held regularly. They were claimed as being the equal of any in Europe so far as the quality of fitment was concerned, with marble baths and individual dressing rooms. Male and female servants were in attendance and invalids were welcomed. Sadly, it was completely destroyed by fire in the summer of 1859.

Monkstown by then was becoming the haunt of the wealthy and with it came the railway to provide convenient city access. A Monkstown extension to the CB&PR railway, with onward rail to Crosshaven, opened to the public in 1902. The line was further extended through Raffeen to Carrigaline in 1903 and the entire Cork to Crosshaven railway was officially opened in 1904. By 1909, 13 trains were running each way on weekdays between Cork and Monkstown and 11 of these ran to and from Crosshaven. The trip from Monkstown to the city took 25 minutes. Seizing upon the tourist potential Monkstown Golf Club was set up in 1908 to attract railway passengers to the area. The train service was, however, short-lived as being a late rail development, it was unable to compete with motor cars. The Cork to Monkstown section of the CB&PR closed in 1932.

Today Monkstown is a picturesque village in a unique setting overlooking Cork harbour. It has a number of very beautiful walking routes, plus attractive bars and a restaurant located in the town centre. The environment is mature and leafy with harbour birdlife an everyday feature. It is no surprise that it remains a haunt of the wealthy and is one of South Cork’s prime residential locations.

Monkstown Castle in the process of refurbishment
Image: Jonathan Thacker via CC BY SA 2.0


Visitors come here to enjoy the scenery, amenities, and the distinguished history it has to offer, as much of its rich past remains to be enjoyed. The town’s fine architecture of the 18th and 19th-centuries has been noted by Cork County Council, who designated the majority of the town’s main streets as Architectural Conservation Areas. The disused railway line from Hop Island to Steam Packet Quay and from Glenbrook to the southern end of Monkstown has been developed into a delightful riverside walk. Some short lengths of the narrow-gauge line are still evident at Toureen.

Monkstown Castle still stands at the top of the Monkstown glen. It was occupied until the 1970s and its last occupants were the Monkstown Golf Club. Unfortunately, there was a fire in the castle and it has since then lain derelict with its roof and floors fell in and nothing but its walls intact. Fortunately, it is currently in the process of being restored. Today it is surrounded by the well-developed parkland course of the Monkstown Golf Club.

From a boating perspective, it provides another Cork Harbour berth with excellent access to Cork City and the harbour itself. Likewise, Monkstown ashore has most all the cruising sailor would require a short stride from the pontoon.


What facilities are available?
Cork Harbour Marina currently provides 90 berths and has unlimited visitor capacity. It can take vessels of up to 17 metres. All berths have power and water. The Marina is very new and still under construction with plans to extend it to accommodate a further 285 berths. Unfortunately they have not yet completed their facilities block, and Monkstown Bay Sailing Club provides toilets and showers to berth holders. This is a five minute walk up to the pleasant village of Monkstown that overlooks Monkstown Bay. There are two slipways and a dry out pad for those who want to scrub; a local chap with a power-wash is available by arrangement. Sail repairs and a marine mechanic, based in neighbouring Passage, are also available by arrangement. Divers may also be arranged should the need arise. A boat can be lifted out in the Cork City dockyards across the river. Diesel is available off the quay in Cobh, again across the river.

The village of Monkstown is very small with a permanent population of less than 1,000. It has three bars, one with a very good restaurant, and there is a delicatessen with a coffee shop. A small mini market offers basic provisions. The town of Passage West, a 2km riverside walk, has improved shopping with a better supermarket, chemist, bank and a post office.

The 223 bus service operates 6am – 11pm, hourly and half hourly at peak times, to Passage West and the city of Cork just 30 minutes away. By road Monkstown is on the regional R610 route running from South Cork City along the western shores of Cork Harbour to Ringaskiddy. It is adjacent to the South City Ring Road linking the southern and western suburbs of Cork City and the national N25 route serving the industrial zone at Ringaskiddy. Ireland’s second largest city Cork, 17 km (11 mi) from Monkstown with the Cross-River Ferry, is highly accessible with all of its onward excellent transport connections. Bus Eireann provides a regular national service including an Air Coach bus service from Cork's Parnell Place Bus Station to Cork Airport throughout the week. Cork Airport is conveniently located just 8 kilometres from Cork City Centre and 17 km from Monkstown.


Any security concerns?
The marina is a totally secured area.


With thanks to:
Marina owner-manager James O’Brien and Eddie English, Yachtmaster Instructor/Examiner Dinghy & Powerboat Trainer at sailcork.com.




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